"Eet men zout?"

Translation:Does one eat salt?

3 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/stephleest

The translation says that "men" can mean "one" or a general "you". Could it also be interpreted as "people" in general? As in: "Do you eat salt in the Netherlands?" or "Do people eat salt in the Netherlands?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brijsven
Brijsven
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Men

Men plays a role as a Singular Indefinite Pronoun with a similar meaning to the one/they in English:

  • One can climb the mountain at their own risk.

  • They say you can see France from the summit.

It is used a fair bit more in Dutch than its English counterpart.

  • Daar kan men vaak sterren zien. -- "One can often see stars there."

  • Eet men zout in Nederland? -- "Does one eat salt in The Netherlands?" (Does the action of 'eating salt' take place/occur in The Netherlands?)

Mensen

de mensen -- "the people"

door mensen gemaakt -- "man-made"

  • Eten mensen zout in Nederland? -- "Do people eat salt in The Netherlands?"

Mens (gendered)

de mens -- "man, mankind, human being" (as a whole or independent entity)

  • De mens moet eten. -- "Man(kind) must eat."

  • Ik ben ook maar een mens. -- "I'm only human."

Mens (neuter)

het mens -- (usually refers to a woman in general).

  • Ik vind dat mens fantastisch voor haar leeftijd. -- "I think that woman is fantastic for her age."

een enig/leuk mens -- "a marvelous/nice creature/soul"

In the example above, notice dat (and not die) precedes mens (indicating that mens is neuter in this context, thus indicating a woman). Another context clue that demonstrates the subject is a woman could be haar.

NOTE: It is worth noting that het mens is frequently used in negative contexts:

  • Ik vind dat mens onmogelijk. -- "I think that woman is impossible."

  • Ze is een gezellig mens, niet waar? -- "She isn't a bad sort, is she?"

  • Mens toch! -- "Good Lord!" [informal] (said when one is surprised); (this can also be used to express 'pity/compassion') -- "You poor thing/soul!" [informal]

Possessive Form

Some examples and content in this section has been retrieved from here

There is no Possessive Pronoun for men. The Dutch use zijn (his/its).

  • Nadat men zijn kleren gekregen heeft, mag hij naar buiten gaan om te rennen. -- "After one has received their clothes, they (then) may go outside to run."

(Bedankt Elidenhaag)

When they is not clearly defined (e.g. "They say the programme is challenging.") , men is often used. An almost synonymous alternative to men in this context is ze. Men may be a bit more formal than ze:

  • Draagt men in Nederland klompen? -- "Do they wear wooden shoes in Holland?"

  • Dragen ze in Nederlands klompen? -- "Do they wear wooden shoes in Holland?"

  • Men zegt dat de economie weer aantrekt. -- "They say that the economy is recovering."

  • Ze zeggen dat de economie weer aantrekt. -- "They say that the economy is recovering."

More Examples

  • Men heeft mij gezegd [...] -- "I've been told [...]"

  • Men zegt [...] -- "It is said [...]" // "People/they say [...]"

  • Men had dat kunnen voorzien. -- "One could have foreseen/anticipated that." // "That could have been foreseen/anticipated."

  • Men mag zout eten in Nederland. -- "One may (= is allowed to) eat salt in The Netherlands."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elidenhaag

Some of this content is incorrect.

One sentence that is particularly flawed is:

"Nadat men zijn kleren gekregen heeft, mag hij dan buiten om te rennen gaan"

This sentence is really awkward. First of all, if a sentence is contracted like this the use of 'dan' after the comma becomes redundant. Secondly, the word 'gaan' in incorrectly placed. Thirdly, "hij mag buiten gaan" is incorrect. A better way of saying this would be 'hij mag NAAR buiten gaan.

my suggestion: " Nadat men zijn kleren gekregen heeft, mag hij naar buiten gaan om te rennen"

Also the last sentence "Men mag zout in Nederland eten" might grammatically be allowed, but the more common way to say it is "Men mag zout eten in Nederland."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brijsven
Brijsven
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Thanks for the feedback. I compiled this on my mobile and copied some content I have elsewhere in various notes and such. Now I clearly see the errors of which you mention, and I agree with you. I intended to use the "Nadat [...]" example in an entirely different thread -- and simply fetched the wrong one without reviewing ;)

I should certainly take the time to review my published posts immediately before/after posting them -- as not to instill a concept/element incorrectly for other learners. I generally keep private notes and drafts until they're ready to be published, (and when I generally have the time to review such long, detailed posts).

Constructed criticism is always welcome towards my posts, and I strongly encourage it for improvement on all fronts ^_^

Thanks again ^.^

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elidenhaag

No problem. I like checking in here now and then to help people out trying to learn this challenging language.

Many kudos on your thorough work and positive attitude! Keep it up!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baptizein

Sorry but I'm French and I don't understand the difference between "does one eat salt" and "does anyone eat salt"... Is there someone who can explain me ? :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JHezza
JHezza
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Does one eat salt? = Is salt something that is eaten (generally speaking)? Does anyone eat salt? = Is there a person in particular that eats salt?

En fran├žais : Does one eat salt? = Mange-t-on du sel ? Does anyone eat salt? = Y a-t-il quelqu'un qui mange du sel ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baptizein

Thank you for your answer ! I just learned something new in english, so... :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Edb4ro

"Mange-t-on" is something you should avoid in french. It is more correct to say "est-ce que les gens mangent?"

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beznatry
Beznatry
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"MANGE-T-ON beaucoup de sel en France ?" and "Y A-T-IL un pilote dans l'avion ?" both feel way more natural in french than sentences in the form of "EST-CE-QUE ... ?" "EST-CE-QUE" is correct french but it feels very dated and is rarely used nowadays, especially when speaking.

Also, when speaking (not so much when writing) you could even say "On mange du sel en France ?" and "Il y a un pilote dans l'avion ?" (same structure as an affirmative sentence) if the tone of your voice makes it obvious that it is a question.

Source : I am french and study linguistics

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Edb4ro

And same for "y a-t-il". Use "est-ce que quelqu'un"

9 months ago
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