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"Tot volgende woensdag!"

Translation:See you next Wednesday!

3 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Elidenhaag

Hmm, as a Dutch person I don't like this phrase. I would never say that and would find it a little awkward if someone said it to me. If you want to blend in with the Dutch, leave out the 'next' and just say "tot woensdag!" If you want to stress the fact that you're not meeting this coming Wednesday but the next after that, use "tot volgende week woensdag" (See you next week on Wednesday)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jcbos
jcbos
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Exactly, being a native as well I completely agree. Will report it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gcd
gcd
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It's a common phrase in the films of director John Landis. Before then, it was a line in 2001: a Space Odyssey.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vivid.illusion

Is "till next Wednesday!" not considered correct English?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/guissmo
guissmo
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Yeah. I got a wrong answer for this too. I hope it gets accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/feyMorgaina
feyMorgaina
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Till and 'til are both correct in English (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/till#Etymology_1)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deguo
deguo
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It's very informal (and also very uncommon in American English), but it's technically correct.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Balaur
Balaur
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I'm sorry to say that's not accurate. Here are a couple of explanations (it's interesting to note that 'till' as been around even longer than 'until', so the former couldn't possibly be a shortened form of the latter): http://grammarist.com/usage/until-till-til/ http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/until-till-and-til

As many native English speakers are still confused about this, I won't blame you, but I want to provide learners--as well as native speakers--with the proper usage and history of these words.

3 years ago