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  5. "Chi ha lo strumento?"

"Chi ha lo strumento?"

Translation:Who has got the instrument?

August 5, 2013

69 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jcrieff

Seriously? "Who has got the instruments?" isn't good English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anne609994

I entirely agree. One can always avoid using "got", for example here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MinorProphet1

In British English, that sentence is perfectly acceptable. Americans don't always see it that way but that's the way it is over here, so it's perfectly correct to be on the course, as that's how people speak.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duke_of_Earle

Ah-ha, another distinction between two groups who purportedly speak a common language, at least according to Gen. Geo. Patton.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xyphax

Thank you duo for putting in sentences with the article 'lo' in the clitics section to remind us it is used as an article as well as a pronoun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Evanna93

The word strumento refers to a musical instrument?Because duolingo says it also means tool


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WolkZayets

I was going to ask the same thing. The English word "instrument" can mean both.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teresinha

|Yes. Example: strumento a fiato = wind instrument.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yvonne41961

In American English you do not need to say has GOT the instrument in this translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChintaCecilia

'who owns the instrument?' is incorrect ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epac-mcl

Yes, because "Chi ha lo strumento" means "Who has the instrument". A person can HAVE something without OWNING it. So, it is the verb "owns" which is incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JDN538746

Apparently, though, "Who has the instrument" is not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fiberhabit

Not accepted on April 23, 2019.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epac-mcl

It should be, because it is quite correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LynnJeffre

Not accepted today 28 Sept 2019


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeraldineMit

Still not Feb 9th 2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linguonator20013

finally accepted, December 21, 2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pat53185

not accepted today nov 2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TitoB.Yoto

"Who has the tool" is accepted correct Jan 13, 2020.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesRit3

"Who has the instrument" was accepted December, 2020.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schatzie14

Who has the instrument? Where is the Italian version of "got"? Duo addited, which by the way, Duo does not permit us. For a good reason...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sharkbbb

In this sentence "got" has no meaning of its own. It is just part of the complex verb "to have got" used predominantly in UK, whereas in US the simple verb "to have" is mostly used.

  • (UK) Who has got the instrument?
  • (US) Who has the instrument?

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pmm123

You're right, but in the US the contraction "who's" (who has) plus "got" is also very common. "Who's got the time?" and "Who's got the ball?" are just two examples that are frequently heard.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sharkbbb

Indeed. But 1) the primary translation here is "Who has got", not "Who's got" and 2) in both cases "got" has no meaning of its own. It is just part of the complex verb "to have got".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pmm123

Ah, OK, I've got it now. ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pmm123

I'm not sure what you meant by "in both cases 'got' has no meaning of its own." In the sentences "Who's got the time?" and "Who's got the ball?", "got" has meaning because if we eliminate it, we change the meaning of the sentences.

"Who's the time?" makes no sense, and "Who's the ball?" means something entirely different from "Who's got the ball?"

I do agree that when it's not used with a contracted form of the verb "have," "got" adds no meaning, and maybe that's what you meant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sharkbbb
  • case 1: "Who has got"
  • case 2: "Who's got"

In both cases "got" has no meaning of its own. It is just part of the complex verb "to have got".

In the sentences "Who's got the time?" and "Who's got the ball?", "got" also has no meaning of its own because if we isolate it, we change the meaning of the sentences:

  • "Who got the time?" means something entirely different from "Who's got the time?"
  • "Who got the ball?" means something entirely different from "Who's got the ball?"

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WolkZayets

I have got to think about this. :) I think "got" is used for emphasis when used with the uncontracted "have".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DannielAda1

"Who has the instrument" is incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pmm123

The way I read the sentence, that should be a correct translation in English. Was it marked wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asesler

Who has got the instrument? I would say who has the instrument rather than inserting the word 'got'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FriscoRama

"who does have the instrument" is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Siobhan009

It isn't grammatically wrong, but it would only be used if the person asking already knew that someone else didn't have the instrument eg: Person A hasn't got the instrument, Person B hasn't got the instrument... Who does have the instrument? (and you'd emphasise the word "does", either by pronouncing it more forcefully or by writing it in italics).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ramin.dhn

I still do not know where does "lo" use!!anyone can help??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sharkbbb
  • lo = the (masculine singular before s+consonant, z, ps, pn, gn, x, y, i+vowel)
  • il = the (masculine singular before other consonants)
  • l' = the (masculine and feminine singular before vowels)
  • la = the (feminine singular before consonants)
  • gli = the (masculine plural before vowels, s+consonant, z, ps, pn, gn, x, y, i+vowel)
  • i = the (masculine plural before other consonants)
  • le = the (feminine plural)

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieMacK13

A very helpful table


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlbertLinguist

Perché il plurale è "gli strumenti" e no "i strumenti"? Non è un sostantivo maschile?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArnoNyhm2

i is the plural of il, gli is the plural of lo and masculine l' and le is the feminine plural


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarilynHolland1

This is poor English grammar! You csn say who has the instrument, or who got the instrument, but not the response that was given.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yvonne41961

I thought the British used has got in some cases. No?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartinC443488

'Who has the instrument' is a perfectly suitable alternative in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katiecoos

Who has the instrument should be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uomodiBalm

"has got" Tut! Tut! not in my English! "has '' - yes! but not "got" p.t. of "get"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ispirac

I heard piano strumento.But maybe I had low concentration.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gordon_gregory

No. The audio was crap. I heard "Chi ha un strumento" on the fast audio, but trusted the slow audio.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pmm123

Terrible audio, I heard "piano strumento" also and I listened to it about 10 times.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ajdjr73

Are you using earphones? I find that helps tremendously and often repeat turtle mode two or three times.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/matti.halinen

I also hear "Piano strumento" in the fast versio and "Pi ha strumento" in the slow one


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teresinha

Today I can hear clearly .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bill98991

Says the father to his 4-year-old son!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ajdjr73

He has an instrument, she doesn't have an instrument.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sofe175

who has the instrument still not accepted 5/10/19


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KKFusionKaran

• Chi ha lo strumento?
• [ Who has the instrument? ]
• [ Who has got the instrument? ]

Accepted translations.

:) KK
novembre 2019


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarySmith132513

Who has the instruments is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiveByTheG

Why do we use "lo" here? Don't we use lo when there are foreign for Italian letters, like in "lo zucchero"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Redant14

Who has got the tool...not accepted? Am I wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stephen91234

Right or wrong and whether or not it is popular with grammatical scholars "who's got the tool? " would be the normal English format to the question . This would certainly apply in the Midlands and North of England . This being said DL usually uses grammatical ,if sometimes strange, language which I follow even if it is not how I speak .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ceramistamarko

I know it's American English, but this example shows how unnecessary and pointlessly used is the word 'got'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jain788630

That might be American English but it’s not correct English English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth514460

You do not need the word got in good English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SueFurnival

Why was" Who has the implement?" marked incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eugene812

has got = has. Is there anyone here to fix it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Claudestephane1

Scusi ma tuo inglese non è perfetto. "has got" fails 8th grade English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_scrase

I just wanna know if mayonnaise is an instrument


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GregDAugustine

Any particular reason why we use "lo" here instead of "il" , as in "il sandalo" ?

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