1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Italian
  4. >
  5. "Lui ha il tuo piatto."

"Lui ha il tuo piatto."

Translation:He has your plate.

August 5, 2013

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hdtsn

Well he'd better be ready for a fight, 'cause I'm getting my plate back!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vandslaux

GIVE. ME. MY. PLATE. BACK.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Viaggiatore

I think "he has got" is a common British expression.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rickelross

Italians speak fast. i can hardly hear the ha and il. sounds like 1 word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schynd

And that's correct. That liaison between vowels is a major feature of proper pronunciation both in Spanish and Italian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dbruschi

Would, "Lui ha tuo piatto," be correct also? Why the use of, "il,"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2364

With certain specific exceptions, the possessive adjective always requires the definite article. The possessive pronoun can include it or omit it, but that subtly changes the connotation.

For the possessive adjective, only singular family members do not take the definite article:
- mio fratello, mia tia
- i miei fratelli, le mie tie
Except when it's "loro". Then always use the definite article:
- il loro fratello, la loro tia
- i loro fratelli, le loro tie

I can no longer recall which way the distinction goes, but the possessive pronoun with or without the definite article is the difference between the thing is yours (not hers) and the thing (not the other thing) is yours.
- Il piatto è il tuo.
- Il piatto è tuo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/valemar_

This translate as "He has got your plate". Why is "got"? I don't understand this moment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2364

"He has your plate." got is non-standard usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeamusCoon

"Non-standard" = "A term used disapprovingly by some non-linguists to describe 'bad' or 'incorrect' English." [http://grammar.about.com/od/mo/g/nonstandterm.htm]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2364

Also a term used by linguists in observation that it is not a common utterance in the standard dialect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuisColind1

Native Spanish speakers help me out. Would this translate to, "El tiene el plato tuyo" (which sounds kinda funny)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2364

Not a native speaker, but no. "He has your plate" would be "Él tiene tu plato".

"Tu" and the like are the possessive adjective, like "your". "Tuyo" and the like are the possessive pronoun, like "yours". "The plate is yours" would be "El plato es tuyo".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brokenostril

I cant even hear the "tuo" in this sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabriel678117

When should we use "il" and when "i"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2364

Rules for the definite article:


https://i.imgur.com/aJ7Qlgb.jpg

Rules for the indefinite article:

Masculine

https://i.imgur.com/ioiRcSS.png

Feminine

https://i.imgur.com/7WZMfoO.png

Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.