" gloine uisce uaim."

Translation:I want a glass of water.

4 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/medieval-monk

Is "Uisce" here in the Genitive case, or is "Gloine" in the Genitive case?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeaininMC

"Uisce" is in the genitive. The forms of the genitive singular for "uisce" and "gloine" are the same as the nominative/accusative, so you can't tell by the form, but by the context.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/medieval-monk

Kay, thanks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alphalyrae
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In English it sounds quite rude/demanding to say 'I want a glass of water' as opposed to 'I would like a glass of water'. Is it the same in Irish?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lg72xx
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Even in English, it might depend on who you are implying will get it for you: "I would like a glass of water" if said to a waiter, etc. But: what if you are getting it yourself? As in, "Wait a minute, I'll be right back; I want a glass of water before we go outside"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mcdsys

How would you say, "I want a water glass."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarmanFutt

Well, unfortunately, I translated this sentence as 'I want a water glass', and the program informed me that "water glass" is "uisceghloinne". :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
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Based on the tearma.ie entry, I’d say that uisceghloine is “water glass” in its “sodium silicate” meaning. Since “wine glass” is gloine fíona, I suspect that “water glass” in its “drinking vessel for water” meaning would be gloine uisce — another example of the genitive ambiguity that exists in e.g. cupán tae, which can mean either “cup of tea” or “teacup”.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soupandbread
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I've never heard of a 'water glass' but i think 'tá gloine uaim le haghaidh uisce' means 'I want a glass for water' if that helps.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lethe-DFD

I know we went over want a while ago so this might not be the most appropriate place for this question, but I can't find the original few sentences.

Do you say "I would like" differently than "I want" (uaim)? And if so, how do you say it?

Saying "I'd like ____ " is much more natural to me, and I seem to get these translations wrong all the time because of it. If I understood the difference, then maybe I'd have less trouble.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/birgit72635
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I have seen this in some former comments: I would like - Ba mhaith liom...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mary614996
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I wrote exactly this phrase and it was marked incorrect. Followed by "the correct solution is...." exactly what I had written. I don't understand.

1 year ago
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