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  5. "Ele corta o queijo."

"Ele corta o queijo."

Translation:He cuts the cheese.

August 5, 2013

50 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cajunesque

some funny guys over there at duolingo lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CHUSA1999

Wait until you start the Dutch course. Oh boy...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MayaB186

what sentences are there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CHUSA1999

I'm not even half done with the course, and I have seen sentences that mean: "Sorry, I am an apple"; "I am a banana"; "The salt is tasty"; "His grandfather is a sheep"; "My spoon is too big" among others. Also, someone told me there is a sentence along the lines of "I am a saltshaker"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ziggy8392

My spoon is too big? Man duolingo's references are out of control


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arjuna725

Mah sppoon is toooo biiiigg


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielDayot

lol. I thought I was the only one who noticed that. I'm still at the start but it's so funny.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SayedElAraby

The Romanian course has the sentence "I have a cock."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/santiago.rojas.

Just to make it ever more clear, "cut the cheese" is a way of saying flatulence in English so a less vulgar translation might be "He slices the cheese" or something like that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Thank. I was wondering the link with the cheese... It's probably an allusion to the smell, lol.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oreography

Yes this is precisely it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnReid8

I never knew that.

Growing up in New Zealand (and being a non native speaker of English) I always interpreted it as an American idiom meaning something along the lines of "He does some (unspecified) work that's important".

It just goes to show that you can never quite get perfect fluency in a language that's not your own.

Thanks for being willing to answer the "stupid" question santiago.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Telisa7

I am so glad I read that. Thank you for sharing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaMelody

Almost everything in English has a vulgar meaning behind it, -UrbanDictionary.com


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Yes. I feel somewhat adolescent, but I must confess I laugh as this sentence is introduced in each language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamWowz

Like Beavis and Butt-head :-D Huhuhuhuhuhuhuhh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohannaD1

What means this word "peidou"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shenzhi

Qui a coupé le fromage?! Hehehe...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

We don't say it in France, we keep the smells of cheese for the ones who had an intensive feet activity...
It's more "lâcher un vent", and things like that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shenzhi

"we keep the smells of cheese for the ones who had an intensive feet activity..." As we do in Germany!

I was merely referring to a Freakazoid Episode (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGqxb3vLL1A)

The most commonly used phrase here for "Gas ablassen" ("lâcher au vent") is "einen fahren lassen", which translates into "letting it go",... not as amusing as it is in english IMHO. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I think it's "to break wind" in English. Yes, I love the English expression with the cheese, but in the country of cheeses, I don't know if they'll understand if I use it.

-C'est toi qui a coupé le fromage?
-Non merci, je n'ai pas faim X-D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J4WNEE

What about "passing gas"? That's probably the nicest way to put it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael_Tavares

that's a very UnitedStatesian way. in the UK, Australia and NZ, "breaking wind" or "passing wind" are the polite ways to say it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IvoryFr96

Ah hah...much more akin to we English-speakers' "break wind"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patrick_vienna

"In a room full of crackers I might cut the cheese" - Method Man. :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/madeofmorebees

I came to the comments looking for laughs and I found them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ana.ms99

i cant believe i actually laughed at this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Egdir

I wonder what the Portuguese equivalent of “cutting the cheese" is...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I've found: soltar uma bufa, but I don't know what is a "bufa" in Portuguese (also "soltar um pum")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tuppencee_

"Bufa" é uma gíria para peidar. "Bufa" is a slang for fart.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wrongstar

This is unfortunate. :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DareAllen

In case anyone was confused by the comments on this one "cut the cheese" is an american way of saying passing gas or farting. So maybe we'll just say 'slice' or something else haha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gioocho

I AM at 35% And have yet to see anything so out of line.. The craziest was O borboleta escreve um livro i Think


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PabloB.1

A borboleta...

Really funny :) Maybe it just want to tell us its life's story.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnpatdou

So, if someone said this to a Brazilian person, they would just take it as its literal meaning, not the colloquial expression referring to flatulence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

No. We understand this sentence literally.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

I have seen this sentence in several languages on Duo. Either it doesn't translate as crude or we are the only ones who still react like adolescents when we hear it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/habixs

The audio in normal speed say CORTO , whereas its in slow CORTA O ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IvoryFr96

Portuguese, like French, is a language that flows and slides off of the tongue, unlike its commonly referenced cousin Spanish and its mother Latin. As such, when vowels are adjacent to one another, it is quite common for the two sounds to become one or for one to seem muffled by the other. I think this is a more likely reason why you only heard "corto" and not "corta o". Duolingo was only mimicking the common manner of speaking.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TobyBartels

They run vowels together in Spanish too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/t2cstevenson

Yes they do, it's just more pronounced in Portuguese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fvieira517

The audio can be whacked. I even mishear "ele" and "ela" at times.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Etherrift

Besides the silly nature of this sentence, the audio for this in Portuguese seems to combine the "Corta" and the article "o". Almost sounds like "ele corto queijo" instead. Is it common to combine adjacent vowel sounds like this or is it just the audio?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/supercalidocious

See Ivory's explaination above

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