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"He lost his direction."

Translation:Él perdió la orientación.

5 years ago

60 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

why the EL before orientacion? Why not SU?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evelyn-Grace

I know its been a year since you asked this haha, but I think it's because he can't own orientation so it's the orientation. Also it's la orientacion ( :

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hammer7777777

Anyone?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Good question. Perhaps it is like the Spanish body parts - using an article instead of a possessive pronoun.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jerobarraco

i have no idea.... you could use both but "la orientación" is more common than "Mi/su"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alibax
alibax
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Su worked for me in Aug 2015

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Perriguez
Perriguez
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Dirección is both your adress and your direction, but if we want to be more specific we usually use 'domicilio' to refer to the adress ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ruinchristmas

and now for this, rumbo is not accepted?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

I think it should be, but keep in mind that we do not say "su rumbo" but "el rumbo".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ruinchristmas

good tip, thanks!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coreyshep

When DL presented me with the Spanish version of this sentence to translate into English, it used "direción" which I always understood to be a false cognate meaning address. Can it also be direction?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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15 Nov 2014 Evidently it DOES mean 'direction'; English 'address' seems to be a specialized word. Dirección (note the two c's) - http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/direcci%C3%B3n (That link looks funny - if it doesn't work, here's Spanish Dictionary's link - http://www.spanishdict.com/ )

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Hmmm. I've forgotten "dirección" is 'supposed to be' a false cognate (and I chose this word without thinking), but apparently it's not (DL accepted it with a suggested "orientación")!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/samuraipoet

Even so. Su rumbo should be fine. Sigh

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/L8rgator

I was so proud whem i remembered rumbo :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayel
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would someone please compare clearly (what's alike and what's different) about direccion, orientacion and rumbo?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jerobarraco

That's kinda tricky. Here's what i think. Dirección: Is almost 1:1 to Direction. Direction is the place where something points to and also suggests that the object itself is moving.

Orientación: Is mostly used also where Orientation is used. Like direction it refers to the place where something is pointing but doesn't actually implies movement. Might be passive pointing. Like the orientation of a plate (upside-down) or the orientation of a flower, sexual orientation, or a vector in math. Also orientation (as it's something that gives the image of external intention) is vague. "Y..... Está orientado hacia allá, pero no sé si llegará bien."

Rumbo is basically 1:1 to Path. It also puts more importance to the path than the objective.

Orientación has a trick though, it's also a verb. Orientar/se. Which means to find or put in the correct orientation. So, that way you could lose your orientation; or you could be desorientado (which is a way to say confused).

In argentina at least the difference is very subtle. "Perdí la dirección" is more common, we like words that sounds less formal. It sounds like you were doing great and suddenly something (external to you) make you lose track of your direction. "Perdí la orientación" less common, maybe in older people (who uses a little more formal words). Something happen in YOU and YOU lost track of your orientation. Like you've got confused or something. It also gives a hint that you weren't too certain of how to get there. "Perdí el rumbo" (we say camino instead of rumbo here). Means you were doing fine and going a pre-set path, and something took you out of it. Used sometimes when something tragic happens, normally with religious contexts. Not really used informally.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BLPK
BLPK
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but not ha perdido? I think the tense in English is ambiguous.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jurekcy1

With Duo you need to be literal sometime - "ha perdido" would be "has lost". In English "has lost" and "lost" are not the same

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayel
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though sometimes when you're literal it's wrong!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/normroosjr

Though people often use them interchangeably.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicholasCazeault

The correct translation should be: "Él se perdió la orientación" because HE lost HIS way.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jerobarraco

AFAIK no, because se would be reflexive. "Él se perdió" means he is lost himself.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/doriskeiser

so why is august 18th's answer wrong?? if it's idiomatic in mexico, why is it wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/August18
August18
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My initial response is to use the se form: "se le perdio la orientacion." Is this unnatural?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola August18: Ahh, you bring up a whole new interesting topic. In Mexico it is called the "No Blame Game". It is a way of saying something so that nobody takes the blame. For instance, in the Duo sentence "Él perdió la orientación", he is to blame, he lost his way, it is his fault. But for the No Blame Game, let's use your sentence, "Se le perdió la orientación". With this sentence, nobody is to blame. It is mangled English, but is says something like: "The direction lost itself to him'. This is VERY common in Mexico. So, therefore, it just happened; nobody caused it to happen; nobody is to blame. Some other common examples: "Se me perdieron las llaves" = "The keys lost themselves to me" (I didn't lose them); "Se me olvidó la tarea" = "The homework forgot itself to me" (I didn't forget it). "Se me hizo tarde el trafico" = "The traffic made me late" (It wasn't my fault). CHAU

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babybrotherangel

I love this. I know it is my keys that lose themselves.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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It was the key gnomes.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dsmilleresq

Excellent post. In English, this is very similar to the passive voice. When you use the passive voice, you say something like "the crime was committed" instead of "he committed the crime." In formal English writing, it is usually disfavored and a good editor will improve an article by converting all of the passive voice statements to active statements. Of course in everyday conversation, the passive voice is very common. I was curious to know if this kind of construction is also common in Spanish and you answered my question. I assume that in quality Spanish writing, the No Blame Game is disfavored. Thank you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Thanks for this input, Lisagnipura! Now my family can stop blaming me for losing stuff! :D!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/August18
August18
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Yes, I understand the distinction! I was wondering more along the lines of whether this is a natural-sounding sentence to a native speaker, since my response was marked incorrect.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola August18: I thought my response above answered that Yes, as I implied above, it is very natural in Mexico as I explained above.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hidethedog
hidethedog
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Would the 'No Blame Game' ever be used in Castillian Spanish?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jerobarraco

Very good, in argentina we abuse from this, but has no name. ironic.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ying56

more useful - He perdido mi camino

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miles_b

"El perdió su ruta" isn't accepted. In my experience, that's a more common phrasing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrandiWL
BrandiWL
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He missed his orientation is accepted and so is He lost his direction. (But not He missed orientation.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RhydianDavies
RhydianDavies
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This is an awkward sentence in English. You'd probably encounter it more in the context "he lost his direction in life". Here are some alternatives, depending on what this actually was supposed to mean:

  1. If someone gave him directions to a place, and he lost them, you could say "He lost the directions he got" or "He lost the directions to <insert place>"

  2. If he simply got lost, then "He got lost" is a good alternative. Also, if he can't find his way for some reason, you could say "He got disoriented." I think that maps nicely to the suggested translation.

  3. There are a lot of idiomatic expressions when traveling by car - "He missed his turn", "He took the wrong turn", etc but I feel they are outside of the scope of this example.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/44767mt

What is the point of giving three hints when ALL of them are WRONG?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlysonFulC
AlysonFulC
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16Oct15: "Él perdió su dirección." is indicated as a correct alternative answer - so one of the dictionary hints IS accepted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maddogjonx
maddogjonx
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why dont you accept ha perdido!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Jan 14, 2016 - 'Ha perdido' = 'he HAS lost' This is Present Perfect, and the sentence is asking for Preterite.

Spanish Dictionary has a verb conjugation section http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/perder If you hover over the labels (Preterite, Imperfect, etc) it gives you an example of that particular tense/mood/voice.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gbyly6

Google translate says "He lost direction" with "la" and "He lost his direction" with "su"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kruts
kruts
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why is "Él perdió su dirreción" wrong?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Oct 12, 2016 - 'direccion' means 'address'. It's a false friend!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adrianauna
adrianauna
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el perdio su via was not accepted. Anyone know why?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bianca1626

so why does it say rumba and that orientacion is wrong?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Languagelover559

Why isn't it "A el perdio su orientacion"? Thanks in advance!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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May 4, 2017 - a el (with accent) is used when he/him is a direct object. In this case Él is the subject of the sentence, so the personal a is not used.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Languagelover559

Thanks for your answer! What exactly is the difference between the direct object and the subject? Forgive my ignorance :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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May 5, 2017 - The subject of a sentence is the noun or pronoun that the sentence is about.

A direct object is the noun or pronoun that directly receives the action of the verb.

In our current sentence, Él/He is the subject. The verb is perdió/lost. What did he lose? su dirección/his direction That's the direct object.

Here's a link to a free course on English grammar: https://www.englishgrammar101.com/ (Notice that the pages slide L to R; there are arrows in the lower corners) Don't let it look overwhelming to you, you certainly don't have to memorize anything. Just look up what you need to know, and it will sink in.

For instance, here are the pages on what I just told you about: https://www.englishgrammar101.com/sentence-structure

https://www.englishgrammar101.com/module-4/sentence-parts/lesson-1/simple-subjects

https://www.englishgrammar101.com/module-4/sentence-parts/lesson-6/direct-objects

Here's another grammar site. http://www.english-grammar-revolution.com/ Perhaps it will be more appealing to you in its presentation. I found sentence diagrams extremely helpful when I was in school and when I was homeschooling my kids. No need to pay for anything!!!

I hope that helps - it is certainly helpful for learning other languages!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Languagelover559

Thank you so much for such a detailed and thorough response! I have no doubt your children are reaping the benefits of having been taught by a teacher that knows what they are talking about! Cheers :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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You are very welcome, AlexMercado. :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobInco1

"él perdió sus dirección" should be accepted! It is even in the drop down in DL

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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July 1, 2017 - "él perdió sus dirección" In this sentence, dirección is singular, so it should be su rather than sus. Sneaky details!! :-D

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MahmoudAli249023

Orientácion is not dirrection, it is direccion

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zina77997

I wrote "El perdio su dirrecion" but it was marked wrong and had me use "El perdio su curso" instead. However, dirrecion is one of the options when I click on the word. I'm so confused.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miles_b

"Dirección" is more commonly used to mean "address." "Curso" is less ambiguous.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gearloose55

You have left off the accents on Él and perdió plus misspelled dirección; perhaps that is why your response was not accepted!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TakakoMori3

his direction should be su direction

3 weeks ago