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  5. "Jag äter kött men inte fläsk…

"Jag äter kött men inte fläskkött."

Translation:I eat meat, but not pork.

January 29, 2015

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruno_108

If I said "Jag äter inte fläskkött utan kött" instead, would that be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

That would mean I don't eat pork but meat – not grammatically wrong, but a little odd in meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruno_108

Yes, I didn't realise it sounded quite off when I wrote it. Just making sure I got the 'utan' right :) Tack!!


[deactivated user]

    Why is "I eat meat, but no pork" wrong? It's English, right?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

    That would be inget fläskkött.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael990548

    Does this course teach Swedish punctuation? I.E. how to use commas, semicolons, etc.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

    Not really, but a crash course is this: use less commas than in English. Only use commas when it's needed for clarity, not as a grammatical marker. This sentence is a good example: the Swedish version is better without a comma.
    Don't use the Oxford comma in Swedish.
    Avoid semicolons because most people use them too much.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dddanilo

    Hey, what's an Oxford comma? I'm not English native speaker and I never heard about that.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessicaRoy659000

    Late reply, but there is an interesting little book by Lynne Truss called "Eats, Shoots & Leaves that discusses English language punctuation as well as other grammar tidbits. There is a section on the Oxford comma and how placement of a comma within a sentence (or leaving it out entirely) can completely change the meaning of a sentence. It's a quick read and I recommend it for anyone who is an English grammar geek ;)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

    A comma used before 'and' in an enumeration: the last comma in "apples, bananas, and oranges". It's widely used in English though recommendations vary, for more details the Wikipedia article is quite good: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_comma


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jay.hammer

    "I eat meat, but no pork." That's excactly what I answered. Duo says it is not correct but that the correct solution is that same sentence i just quoted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    The correct solution says "not pork", you wrote "no pork".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmedAmine448576

    Funny that flesh's cognate refers to pork alone.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    It's because fläsk is technically and originally a specific cut of pork. Over time, it came to refer to the whole type of meat instead.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MetalFan1

    The difference between men and utan, for meaning "but"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    You use utan in direct response to a negative in the first clause. So it means "but rather", so to speak.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soorin6

    Hi what does "men" mean here?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    It means "but".

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