Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Mi madre nunca salió."

Translation:My mother never went out.

5 years ago

113 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Treecie

DL now accepts: My mother never left.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dspeiser

Mi madre nunca se fue ... y me pregunto por qué estoy teniendo problemas en mi matrimonio...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArrigoC
ArrigoC
  • 25
  • 1212

Me río!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
  • 18
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

I wonder why. That means «Mi madre nunca se fue».

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Treecie

Hmmm, se fue = he/she left...salió = he/she left. I'm pretty sure salir includes: to go out, to come out, to leave, or depart. And, ir or irse is to go or go away. It is again possible that this particular DL sentence can be written and said to mean the same thing two different ways. I welcome the Spanish masters here in the forum to confirm, deny, and/or clarify.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
  • 18
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

Well, this is complicated, if somebody said to me «voy a salir» I'd take that as «I am going/coming out». I think one can leave a place without going/coming out (does this make sense?) so to me «to leave» means «irse». Maybe it's something regional and people from other countries can relate salir to leaving. I wish I could express myself better in English, sorry if I'm confusing you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PupherFish

I think I get your meaning. If she were to be in an open field and left it, she would not be going out.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/3Spanish5Me

Mi madre salio ):

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eiquin
Eiquin
  • 25
  • 25
  • 19
  • 18
  • 764

jajaja :))

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1spacebomb1

Really....................

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miza713

What are, "Things You Hear at the Bates Motel"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/savourtardis
savourtardis
  • 21
  • 18
  • 16
  • 11
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1367

Or, a lead-up to "Hey Mama Welcome to the Sixties" in Hairspray. ("I haven't left this house since 1951")

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tomadafaka

Another one of those sentences...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/holly.k.ma
holly.k.ma
  • 21
  • 13
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

Why did she never go out/ didn't your Father never take her on dates.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maennelito

My mom never logged out...after she discovered that online casino ^^

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sanmiguel82

What! not even to Iceland?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MexicoMadness
MexicoMadness
  • 21
  • 15
  • 11
  • 10
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 30

I put "never went" and It was not accepted even though it was on the dropdown menu.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/careling2

Same here. Left was not even a choice. I guess we are learing by error again. Lol

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lucastar1

Yes, i did too. Not impressed that it didnt accept it. :-/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

Went is different than went out. Went translates to fue or iba while went out translates as salió or salía. As a Germanic language, English has these verb preposition combinations which function like the separatable verbs in German and will often have different translations. So never went is not a correct translation, it must be went out or left. To go out and to leave are somewhat different, but they both translate as Salir. To go translates as ir.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joander
joander
  • 25
  • 12
  • 6
  • 2

Why is "My mother never left" wrong. Left is listed in the drop down menu. Thanks

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sdtrask1
sdtrask1
  • 19
  • 12
  • 220

Accepted now.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

I think this is another case where context would help. While my mother never went out is the translation of that sentence it is not the sentence I would expect for the meaning that comes to mind without more context. Ayer mi madre nunca salió makes sense but the more general never we understand without the time frame added I would expect to be Mi madre nunca salía. My understanding is that the imperfect is the tense used in the past to indicate routine or habit and other actions without a definite beginning and ending in the past. Am I wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Darkshadow117

To go out = Salir

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
  • 18
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

To come out also means salir but duolingo did not accept it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lesliedawne
lesliedawnePlus
  • 25
  • 25
  • 14
  • 13
  • 10
  • 10
  • 4
  • 4

thought this would be imperfect.. ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marin222

It should be imperfect, I think. Or perhaps it can be assumed that it happened during some fixed time interval during which mother didn't left the room.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BirdieWolf

I see that another translation of salio is logged out. So if I wanted to say "Log off the computer" It would be 'sale la computadora?'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kitsune.yo

If mother never ever left [a place], that would be"Mi madre jamas salió", right? Such as, my mother was always home or my mother stayed with her husband through the years?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

In an earlier lesson we learned "jamás" for "never" and someone mentioned that "jamás" is more commonly used for "never" and that "nunca" is more severe (like, never ever.) Is this accurate?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
  • 18
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

It's actually the other way around, nunca is more commonly used, jamás means the same thing, but for some people it adds more emphasis, never ever is literally translated as nunca jamás.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HughesRyan

Opposite

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martelizabeth

"Mi madre nunca salio" could not be "My mother never came out"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cleolin
cleolin
  • 20
  • 13
  • 7

How can you tell if it means "went out" versus "came out"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

The difference between went out and came out is in the perspective of the speaker not a difference in what the mother did. Salir is both because it is what the mother does. Other context clues are used in Spanish to indicate whether the mother was going toward or away from the speaker when she left.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GazMembrane

In her lifetime?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sunlemon
sunlemon
  • 17
  • 14
  • 14
  • 7

My mother never came out?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cliftonlemon

Still not getting the difference between jamas and nunca. Don't quite understand how you can be more emphatic with "never," it's like being a little bit pregnant, right? This seems to be a rare case where there are two words in Spanish for something but only one in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

Well, denotatively they're identical, but connotatively they're a little different. They both mean "never," but one is more emphatic. Like the difference between being "mad" and being "furious," or being "glad" and being "ecstatic," or the difference between "I don't like Jim" and "I hate Jim."

If I was saying, "I'll never have kids," people might think I'll change my mind someday, but "I WILL NEVER PUT MYSELF THROUGH NINE MONTHS OF BLOATED DISCOMFORT TO HOUSE A CONSTANTLY GROWING PARASITE THAT WILL ONE DAY EXPLODE FROM MY ABDOMEN AFTER 37 HOURS OF THE MOST INTENSE PAIN IMAGINABLE AND LEAVE ME FOREVER WITH PERSISTENT FAT AND STRETCH MARKS" leaves significantly less doubt. These two sentences, in Spanish, would probably use different translations of "never."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cliftonlemon

whoa, so nunca for one & jamas for the other? OK...In a way I kind of like the idea that "never" is perhaps somewhat negotiable, maybe that accounts for a more realistic view of human behavior! Thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nellybelly6

Which one is more emphatic? jamás or nunca?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

Synonyms tend to differentiate or specialize themselves over time to a certain extent. But that can be regional often. I looked up jamás in the RAE and the first definition was one word - nunca. Now the RAE edition waa the one for android, so that might be less detailed, but it os clear that some of the feelings about the strength of the two words is either idiosyncratic or regional. We don't really have any good one word synonyms for never. But as I said there are few words that we consider synonymous that most people would agree would substitute for each other in all circumstances.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cliftonlemon

Right, I'm beginning to see how a lot depends on context and also on how sentences sound..."jamas" when sung in un bolero romantico has a certain flavor.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AR_Elsherbiny
AR_Elsherbiny
  • 23
  • 22
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 43

There must be a better way to teach us about verbs. We have to learn about all verbs conjugates for each pronoun in present and in past tense too. Throwing all these verbs at us does not make it easy.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

For people who don't have any background in Spanish I highly recommend using additional web resources. There are actually several good ones out there, but to start out I would recommend Spanishdict.com. They are an online.dictionary with detailed.definitions, translate longer chunks using three different translation engines. They also have detailed Spanish grammar lessons with tests. Their dictionary includes complete conjugation of.verbs and many sample sentences. With all the regular and irregular verbs, stem.changing verbs, spelling changing verbs.and so many more conjugations than English, most people need some verb.support all through their education. Duo.does.a lot with a little, but is not really a good sole.source for learning.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AR_Elsherbiny
AR_Elsherbiny
  • 23
  • 22
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 43

Thank you for the info, I already know about spanishdict.com and also studyspanish.com is a good website. I didn't know that they have tests as well. I guess I will have to use it more. Any advice about learning conversation?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

You don't have your location listed, so that makes it difficult. I am assuming you have little access to native speakers. There are two issues in conversation. The first is understanding spoken speech. To do that, you.must immerse yourself in it. One early way to do that is movies. If you live in the US or have access to any videos that are like ours, look for a DVD or video that has an option for a Spanish language soundtrack in addition to and English one (or any language you speak fluently). It is especially helpful if you already are familiar with it. Watch the video in the fluent language several times until you know the flow of conversation throughout the movie. Then keep watching it in Spanish. Gradually you will begin to understand more and more. This gets your ear primed and you also become more familiar with how things are phrased in Spanish. The other issue is speaking. I know there are services which match people who want to learn each other's languages and you talk over VOIP or some smartphone aps. This keeps changing and I haven't done that yet. The other thing is to force yourself in free time alone to have some make believe conversations in your head. Translate as many of your thoughts into Spanish. Don't worry about whether.the grammar is perfect. Your first conversations will be far from perfect. But you must make sure you speak outloud to get your mouth used to forming the words. Whenever you can, read Spanish aloud. The fear of.being wrong is what stops most.people from trying.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PilgrimNorma

I find that I FEEL like I'm actually learning Spanish when I repeat what the voice says enough times to say it as fast as she does. Challenging for me, but worthwhile. In teaching ESL, I tell my students "We learn to speak by speaking." Listening to myself, I speak the Spanish. It seems to form a new link in my brain. Not just the reading and listening areas of the brain, but also speech areas. It takes a while for me to wrap the muscles of my mouth around some of those fast-flowing vowel sounds.. I do this, because after all, I don't want to learn to read Spanish. I want to be able to communicate in Spanish with people who don't know English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AR_Elsherbiny
AR_Elsherbiny
  • 23
  • 22
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 43

Thanks a lot. This is very good advice

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

There's a channel on YouTube called "Learn Spanish with SpanishPod101.com" that I recently discovered while searching for ways to expose myself to conversational Spanish in a slow, easy-to-digest way. I've only looked at a few of their videos, but it seems promising.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AR_Elsherbiny
AR_Elsherbiny
  • 23
  • 22
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 43

thanks SqueezeboxSarah, I will definitely check this youtube channel :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Spanish tv maybe.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Even duo will refer us to other sites.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

I agree with Lynette. I don't think Duo was intended to be your sole source of exposure to Spanish, but more like an accessory. Teachers often use it, for example, as an additional practice tool for students learning in a formal classroom setting. I took 4 years of Spanish in high school, 2 semesters in college, a third of my family is Mexican, and my college roommate was a Spanish major who studied in Peru, Guatemala, and Ecuador, so I came into Duo with a significant amount of familiarity. However, I still do regular outside research, especially with regard to verb conjugations, when I'm trying to express myself in Spanish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Don't give up. You will learn them in context and via discussion and repetition repetition..repetition. Then look aback and see all the verbs you do know...all the words. They are just words.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Olivia3104

Well.....I at least got it right by saying- "My mom never went out."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ian_H
Ian_H
  • 25
  • 17
  • 14
  • 10
  • 577

Won't accept madre with a capital M???

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

I am a little surprised at that, but different languages have different rules of capitalization, and you basically found one here. The only reason that you would capitalize mother in English would be if you were using it as a title, and you would not do so in Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sapo352

Isn't the word "nunca" a trigger word for the imperfect tense? If so, the correct translation should be: Mi madre nunca salía.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

Nunca can certainly be a trigger word, but the use of the preterite here actually turns what is essentially ambiguous in English to a different meaning. Mi madre nunca salía. My mother was an agoraphobic shut in. Day after day she never went out. Mi madre nunca salió. I am her alibi, officer. I was home with her all night and she never went out.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sapo352

Thank you for the excellent, and very helpful examples that you gave.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/susannah07

Imperfect, I agree. Or can it be both, changing the meaning somewhat? Can anyone clarify this?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alejandro110780

my mother was never out - is wrong. why?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hugo31002

Because she never WENT out, its not the same thing, imagine she was outside then it doesnt mean she went outside only she was outside

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

"Salió" makes me think of, "sally forth:" start out, set forth, start off, set out, start, depart, part, leave.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

I thought this as well...I suspect they are cognates.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/agdonald
agdonald
  • 14
  • 12
  • 8
  • 7
  • 4

Why won't it accept "my mother never logged out". Duolingo puts it even as an option

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PilgrimNorma

I have the same question, agdonald. The drop-down showed "logged out" as an acceptable translation for solio. What does "My mother never went out" mean, really? She never dated? She was cloistered, like a contemplative nun? No context so in my mind, "Never logged out" is something an aging, non-tech-savvy mother might do...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Yeah, “Bugged out!” doesn't work, either.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hugo31002

"Outside" is not correct, hmpf...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EllaQueEsta

Pobrecita.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/strangeshay

Will "jamas" work?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

Yes, but not as likely for this sentence as I read it. Jamás is much more emphatic a never. If your mother was bedridden or an agoraphobic or in some other situation where she literally never left the house you would say that, but that would likely be in the imperfect (salía)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leahs407

is she a loner

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alex271054

why not: 'my mother didn't ever go out' ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kimberly778812

My mother never went

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

Went would be ir not salir. Salir is to go.out or leave. That would be Mi madre nunca iba. But using ir in the imperfect like that would require a little more backstory or context as never going out can be long term or repeated easily, but never going implies an event or something like the annual fireworks or something.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pragmar

Went vs went out. For me, those two are the same.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

They are not used interchangeably in English. "Went out" cannot be used in all of the same situations where the versatile "went" can be used. "I went to the bathroom" is a common phrase, but "I went out to the bathroom" only really works if you own an outhouse (assuming you were at home when you went to the bathroom.) If you're playing with your kids in the yard and go into the house to take a phone call, you wouldn't say, "I went out to take a phone call." Of you ate lunch with a coworker in the office break room, but later told someone "We went out to lunch," it's misleading because that person would assume you guys left and went to Panera or something, to say nothing of the potential romantic connotation of "went out." When I went to Wizard World with my dad and sister, I would have said I "went out" to the bathroom (which was in an area outside of the huge convention hall,) but it would have sounded weird and confusing to say "I went out to the table selling the swords." (which is four tables down from where my dad was.) He would have said, "They have tables set up outside? What, in the hallway? I didn't see any."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulo135855
Paulo135855
  • 18
  • 17
  • 16
  • 14
  • 2
  • 4

Que triste eso!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luthien849782

Again, testing for a word never yet introduced before, and not provided with enough translations in the drop-down. This is rather frustrating.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Savithri5

what is the difference between nunca and jamas?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cclegolascc

When do you use jamas and when do you use nunca?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

There is some disagreement about that so I assume there is some regional variation. But the concensus seems to be for those that see a difference that jamás is more emphatic (perhaps like never ever) . But you will see both used seemingly interchangeably.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Defaulto1

How about "My mother-in-law never left"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

There is a completely different word for mother-in-law in Spanish, and she is clearly not the mother being referred to here. Your sentence would be "Mi suegra nunca salió."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Defaulto1

It was more of a suggestion to DuoLingo. It's a phase I'd be more likely to use. ¡Thanks for the translation!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

I would encourage suggestions to Duolingo especially about vocabulary that you would like to see added, but comments to Duo are made through the flag. These user comments are mostly unmonitered.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JenniferFa217178

Me and Mi sounds the same to my ear in spanish.... any tips as to how to know one from the other ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

Over time you will be able to tell them apart on the initial hearing, but those two words would never be used in the same position in a sentence. Me will always be followed by a conjugated verb or attached to a verb form which can accept an attached pronoun object. Mi will almost always be followed by a noun except in the phrase a mi. Sentence structure is often the clue to meaning. It is how you determine whether como means I eat or like or in English whether it is to, two, or too.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GeorgeMacP

I can't do spanish accents with my phone therefore i always get this one wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

Are you sure you can't do Spanish accents on your phone? All Androids should, and I believe all IPhones should. I know on all my android phones I simply press and hold a letter and get many options. For example by pressing and holding a I can produce @ ą ă æ å ä ã â á à.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

I was going to say this, but I'm glad you did, because you did it better than I would have.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elise241362

i put 'my mother never went out' but apparently it is' my mother never excited??' sent see how that makes sense

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

"My mother never went out" is the exact translation listed at the top of this page. How could it have been marked wrong? Was there a typo in there?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_MsLexi_
_MsLexi_
  • 22
  • 17
  • 12
  • 581

What is the diffetence between "jamás" and "nunca"? Don't they both mean never?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

You will find many discussions on the web about the difference between Nunca and jamâs. The concensus is that they are essentially the same, but jamás is more emphatic. Here is one of the many sources.

https://spanish.stackexchange.com/questions/11949/what-is-the-difference-if-any-between-nunca-and-jam%C3%A1s

If they didn't accept both, you should report it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ashan801522

Would anyone like to be my texting buddy to practice spanish

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

There is an app called HelloTalk that lets you do that with people around the world who are native speakers of the language you're trying to learn, and are also learning your language. If you're comfortable with helping someone learn English while you learn Spanish, it would be a great option for you. You can send text-based messages, and when you receive a text-based message, you can make corrections to it and send it back to the other person do that can see which parts they got wrong. You can also send voice messages to get feedback on your pronunciation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OsamaAhmed12

thanks for mentioning that app, i hope it be useful

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZezoZelo

When do I use "Jamás" and "Nunca"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

This question has been asked and answered several times in this stream. This is a much asked question on the Internet as well. Essentially the concensus is that they are reasonably synonymous, but that jamás is somewhat more emphatic.

https://spanish.stackexchange.com/questions/11949/what-is-the-difference-if-any-between-nunca-and-jam%C3%A1s

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobInco1

"my mother never departed" should be accepted since it is a valid translation of salió in spanish dictionary and according to my native spanish speaking friends. Get with it DL!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

Departed is absolutely a valid translation for salió, but hardly common in English parlance. In order to limit the number of possible correct answers and produce a better result than Google or other translations, Duo has a common for common convention. The only consistent departure from that convention is when there is a true cognate, because it is natural that the cognate will come to mind first. So if the verb were partir and it was its meaning depart as opposed to its other meanings, than depart would probably be accepted. But I doubt if you would find this sentence formed with depart once on 100 times it was said. So that puts it squarely in the what you should understand as a native English speaker category. Duo is not charged with accepting every single possible synonym, only those that most users would commonly use and that Duo's conventions don't indicate a more likely translation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlessMV

My mother never excited - Its gamatically wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

Excited is also not a correct translation. Maybe they had My mother never exited? It's not a natural English sentence but it does mean basically the same thing.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MirandaAlbertoni

Is there a difference between jamas and nunca? or can you just use either of them in sentences.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

There is a lot of discussion on the web about this. The concensus is that many people use both rather interchangeably, but jamás is more emphatic. The linked article says that the original meaning of jamás was always, so if your goal is to read medieval Spanish literature - be prepared. Actually, for some strange reason it is not unusual for words to change slowly over time into their opposites.

https://spanish.stackexchange.com/questions/11949/what-is-the-difference-if-any-between-nunca-and-jam%C3%A1s

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andyarteaga

jamas and nunca are synonyms.... for gramatical rules you must use synonyms when you use the same word in the same paragraph

example jamas regresaré porque nunca me dan de comer also nunca regresaré porque jamas me dan de comer

(This is for formal conversation)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Angry_Mongoose

Thanks again, Dou! If my mom is a murder suspect, I can say she never went out!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sequoia697316

I feel bad for your mother she should have went out now shes crazy

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

She should have gone out, not she should have went out. The English here is actually like the Spanish would be debería haber ido with the past participle not the simple past.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/agirl432

let say MY MOTHER WANT OUT A LOT.

4 months ago