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"No es posible tener ambas cosas."

Translation:It is not possible to have both things.

0
5 years ago

57 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/isaacwkm

You can't eat your cake and have it too, ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

18
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Goran1995

Unless you have 2 cakes.

4
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mcnaulty

I said it is not possible to have both items. Should be correct

9
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Irlanda1204

Items is use when you are talking about something in specific.....

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Asamar_Tass

There are only two tragedies in life : one is not getting what one wants, and the other is getting it.

No es posible tener ambas cosas.

9
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/knowingisgrowing
knowingisgrowing
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How do you know when to make the verb infinitive?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

This is a literal translation from Spanish to English. Are neither of them your native tongue?

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Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JahvonDown

Es mutuamente exclusivo

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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It's not possible to have both. It's also correct normally?

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaiusAugustus

This is correct, but you left out "things" at the end.

But "It's not possible to have both things" AND "It isn't possible to have both things" are correct.

5
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jimijimmy

I made the same 'mistake' that Perce-neige made, and am wondering why it is incorrect, because in American English, "both" can become a noun and substitute "both things" ex. "Can I have both" means the same as "can I have both (noun)"

My question is, in Spanish, are you allowed to say "ambas" alone and treat it as a noun? ex. "puedo tener ambas" instead of "puedes tener "ambas cosas_"

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Yes, you can use ambas alone in Spanish.

7
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee811953

A sad case of mutual exclusivity

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PvtCowboi

unless it's DEEZ NUTS

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Was cosa/s also defined as 'a mess'?

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

(Hello ;]). I think you are confusing it with "caos". Mess = caos, desastre. Cosa = thing.

5
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Good afternoon Babella, Yes I must be mixed up with the word usage. By you correcting me I also learned that the English word "chaos (mess, disorder)" likely means the Spanish "caos". We pronounce chaos as kay os.

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Yes, it means the same. You can hear the Spanish pronunciation here: http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=caos

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davgleonard

What is the difference between "no es posible" and "es imposible"?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/constructionjoe

It's not possible / It is impossible.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Argentleman

It's not possible / It is possible

Right?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davgleonard

Thanks, I can see that :-) but why say "no es posible" when you mean "es imposible" ?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Argentleman

Oh I see what you're saying now. I'm not sure how prefixes work in Spanish, if there are any, but there's probably no difference. Saying "es imposible" should be correct, but it's not a literal translation.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peterbrady616

does ambas always mean both?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shude
Shude
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As far as Wiktionary and I know, it does. :)

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/imtonie

why not "es no posible" ?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

Because Duo is trying to teach us how to use verb infinitives in this lesson. BTW: "es no posible" is incorrect, the "no" always goes BEFORE the verb. It should be, "No es posible," and we already learned that ages ago.

3
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danielbgd

Wouldn't "It's not possible having both things." also be correct?

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Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Contractions are perfectly legitimate translations, although you should know that contractions are generally used in conversations and informal writing, like memos. Contractions aren't used in formal speech or writing.

1
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danielbgd

Thanks for the explanation.

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Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4

tener is literally ´to have´. teniendo is ´having´.

for me I would find ¨ it´s not possible to have both things¨ or ¨having both things is not possible (is impossible)¨ to be completely natural but DL encourages and translation of an acurate Spanish meaning into correct English, using the same words if you can eg, use translation of ´things´ even though it makes sense without.

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Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danielbgd

Good explanation, thank u.

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Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pastafarianist

You can't have both things.

While not a perfectly literal translation, I feel this is sufficiently close to be accepted. It wasn't.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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Good, because it isn't! There is a difference between saying you CAN'T .... (and certainly in speech and, some argue in written English also, where it has meaning of "may" ) and "it is not possible to....". That is why we have both expressionsnin English and it is patently obvious in Spanish also. I cannot see why you or anyone else perversely submits inaccurate translations. Even more bizarre is then telling us about it as a grievance!

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pastafarianist

I'm afraid I have to disagree about it being inaccurate. "You can't" may be about what one is allowed to do (under the current law or rules, you can't smoke here), what one is capable of doing (in terms of skills or physical shape, you can't lift more than 100kg) or what one is potentially able to do (under the physical laws, you can't beat gravity by flapping your hands). Feel free to interpolate between these.

Under this classification, the flavour of "you can't" used in the original phrase is somewhere between the 2nd and 3rd option.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4

Saying "you can't" can imply several specific things. 1. the speaker is withholding permission (and could be challenged) 2. the object of the statement lacks ability but someone else could, 3. it is a rule, policy or law that can't be done because of a consequence or 4. the impact on someone else (you cant drive like that or you will kill some one. The implications of impossibility are different. It is not possible to live on the sun. No-one (known or imagined so far ) can live on the sun. You could use "you can't" live on the sun to include all living things but that's really a lazy way to say it is impossible

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4

Aditionally, when Dl asks you to translate the word ´impossible´ while maintaining the meaning of the statement then you WILL NOT arrive at the same translation as if you had been asked to translate ´no puede´even when the statement otherwise has the same meaning.

The differences seem small but can have large grammatical difference. Spanish can treat universal statements (aquí se habla español; Spanish is spoken here ) very differently to direct ones ((Usted) puede hablar español aquí; you can speak spanish here).

´posible´seems to be a key word that DL is presenting for you to master- if it is not present in the correct form you haven´t arrived yet even if you can achieve the meaning in other forms. Simple.

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Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

poder means both "may" and "can" and the difference between "may" and "can" is not a consideration here. In the Spanish to English course it would be.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

EugeneTiffany, both here and in the Spanish to English course, the definitions of the words of both languages ARE the consideration! The meaning is the consideration, and knowing about both languages is key. It may seem obvious to you, but to many people who study Spanish at this site, figuring out which Spanish or English meaning to translate is part of learning another language.

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Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Johngt44, leaving aside whether people perversely submit inaccurate assessments, there ARE honestly different opinions about what constitutes the best interpretation. What Pastafarianist offered was a connotative translation rather than a literal one. The thing is, at some point, some sentences simply cannot be translated literally.

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Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GeekyKhan
GeekyKhan
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Would it be correct if I translated it as "It is not possible to have both Jerks" ? As duolingo gives 'jerks' as a translation. Just kind of a funny translation.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Jerks is the wrong word.

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Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kwhat365

why is it not "a tener" (to have), like in the duolingo sentence "El empieza a comer" (he starts to eat)?

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee811953

Because tener is not preceded by another verb in the infinitive form. Example: "voy a caminar", I am going to walk. "Voy is 1st person singular form of "Ir", which means to go In the sentence. the "a" connects it to "caminar". "No es posible tener ambas cosas" , tener is the only verb. It stands alone, and is not connected to another verb. I hope this helps.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4

Correct Dee. Though there is two verbs in the sentence the verb ´to be´is connected directly to possible while tener is the verb (standing alone) connected to ´ambas cosas´.

English can have an almost infinitely long sentence using recursion eg, The girl hit the boy that shouted at the bad cat that hissed at his dog as it tried to start to eat.

there are six verbs in this sentence and yet three verbs are NOT connected to another verb and three verbs ARE

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Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

There are two verbs in this sentence. First is "es." Second is "tener."

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Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jazzy.R.L

Don't tell me what I can't do, Duolingo.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tylerdfy

I said "its not possible to have both" Why is that wrong. ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Two reasons: 1) its ≠ it's, and 2) you forgot "cosas."

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Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cythra
Cythra
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Hello Why is "take" both things wrong? Thanks for your help!

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UmaObasi
UmaObasiPlus
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Tener is not Take.

Tener = Have;

Tomar = Take.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kyle_Frank

I put "It is not possible to have both." Do I need to specify by saying they are things even though "thing" isn't a very very specific word?

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

In either language, you don't need to specify both. However, that's the way this particular example is.

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Reply2 months ago