"Chefen vill ha mer kaffe."

Translation:The boss wants more coffee.

January 30, 2015

24 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/munky2010

So let him make his own! :@


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Låt chefen göra sitt eget kaffe!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaptorsOnBikes

When would you use "mer" and when would you use "fler" for "more"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

Usually, mer is for uncountable things like ’coffee, jam, milk, happiness’ etc, and fler is for countable things like ’car, dog, plate’ etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaptorsOnBikes

Ah, wondered if that would be the case!

So I would say, for example, "jag vill lära mig mer svenska"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

Yep, that’s perfect.

In colloquial speech, mer is sometimes used instead of fler as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/czvee

So I could say "Chefen vill ha fler koppar kaffe." then?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Not as a translation here, but it's a perfectly fine phrase if your boss wants more cups of coffee.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liseduif

Is "vill" in this case an informal form of asking that you want something, or a formal form? for example: in english formal is: "I would like more coffee", and informal is: "I want more coffee", but how does that work in Swedish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Quite much the same as in English. If you say "jag skulle gärna vilja ha mer kaffe", it's polite. But if you say "jag vill ha mer kaffe", it might sound rude.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katerpilla4

Why is there a 'ha' in the sentence? What does it translate as?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimK77777

It was mentioned earlier that "vill ha" translates as just "wants".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seeheer

In previous lessons I have learned that chef means cook. Why here it means boss ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

"Chef" in English means cook.

"Chef" in Swedish means boss.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/misko499

Yes you are wright, but the word is chief, not chef. Chef is english word for cook, and chief is also english word for boss.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/floppet

Is "vill ha" two separate verbs, one in present tense and one in the infinitive form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SkldpadsJordgubb

In other sentences, /chefen/ could be translated as "my boss." Could that be the meaning here?

(I answered "My boss wants more coffee," but it was not accepted.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/misko499

The chief or the boss, please, where is the difference? Thank's


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marley29513

Why is it "ha" and not "har"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

The main verb is in the present tense, and the other verb in the infinitive. So it's the same reason you couldn't say "the boss wants to has".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabriBelhaj

It sounds Fefen????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SkldpadsJordgubb

Depending on dialect, the "sj" sound in Swedish can sound a lot like "f." Here's a YouTube video that tries to explain it, although it gets pretty technical: https://youtu.be/OvlwXQ1bDvc

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