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"Ahora no puedo estar en tu casa."

Translation:Now I cannot be at your house.

5 years ago

52 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/covallis

Can 'Ahora' be translated to 'right now'? It marks me wrong when I use 'right now' instead of just 'now.'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/israelgarc13

It is wrong, right now means: Ahora mismo

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BryanEdwar5

I completely agree, although I would say that ahorita is also acceptable.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee811953

I have been told by native speakers that ahorita means right now.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BryanEdwar5

It does. I was adding to israelgarc13's statement that ahora mismo means right now.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee811953

Gracias por su repuesta.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cardano
Cardano
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Ahorita can mean "right now" especially in Latin American dialects. However, in some places, like Puerto Rico, ahorita can mean later.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catcampion

Here in Ecuador, ahora often means later today, tomorrow...or never.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DyAnne405241

When one word means so many things how can one know what someone is saying?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anjaliv3

Agreed. I feel that 'right now' should be accepted too.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CA_Hill

I agree too, although my Mexican novia suggests that ahora mismo is a better "right now"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanleyShi3

Ahora means now.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mollykeller

^^^ I keep saying right now and getting marked wrong and it's very frustrating

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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That's at least four of you repeatedly saying "right now" for ahora so it's not an individual quirk. I learned it as just "now" very early on studying Spanish and I am curious why a bunch of you have "right now" so implanted you feel compelled to use it...? Is it a regional thing? You all from some place where that phrase is very common?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rDnB
rDnB
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I'm from the States and I learned "ahora" as "now."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Audreyinmelody

I am from the States, and while I understand that ahora mismo means right now, in American English it sounds very odd to me to say "Now I cannot be in your house." It suggests that something has been done to change the status of being allowed into the other's home. It really depends on the context, so I translated it as what I felt was most likely in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duck465596
Duck465596
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Estar is used because "puedo" in the sentence is already conjugated for yourself, you only conjugate once in a sentence unless there is a separation by the word "que". So because puedo is already conjugated for yourself, you dont conjugate the next verb "estar" for yourself as well.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeannaPowe

Thank you!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blglenn1

Thank you! This was the answer I was looking for!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mingersai

Why it's estar but not estoy?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brian934152

I gave this guy a lingot because I have the same question. Why is estoy being present tense for yo an incorrect answer?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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The second verb should be in the infinitive in Spanish

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elitexemnas

Is there a difference between the words for "Home" and "House"? I typed the former and was marked wrong. I did report it just in case.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

El hogar = home/household. La casa = house.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crispybacon94

wouldn't it be better if you could choose between both 'estar' and 'ser' in the drop-down menu as well as the different conjugations of 'estar'??? that way you couldn't mindlessly just go for the one with 'ar/er/ir' at the end and actively learn the difference between the two. just a thought..

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/littleowlalexa

It's like a telenovela!!! O.O

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emilykamalei

On another sentence, "stay" was accepted for the verb "estar" in the same context (in your house). Why is it not acceptable here?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sebamunozf

Because "stay" implies you are already there, "estar" means the person is not necessarily there. Hope it helped ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I believe that it is estarse. Here's a link that may help---

http://spanish.about.com/od/usingparticularverbs/a/estarse.htm

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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This solves the mystery.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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I used "stay" and it was accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmccririck

Why is it 'tu casa'? I thought your is translated as su?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shude
Shude
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Yeah, in case you're still confused, I thought I'd try to clear it up a little.

In Spanish, you use different forms for "you" if you are familiar with the person (tú) or if you are being formal (usted). When conjugating and using possessive pronouns (tu/su), the formal form looks like the third person. For example, "usted habla" means "you talk" (but "ella habla" means "she talks"), and "su coche" can mean "your car" or "his/her car."

If using the familiar form, you would just say, "tú hablas" or "tu coche."

As I understand it, when to use the formal vs. the familiar depends on the culture of the area.

Hope this helps!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Your can be translated as su/tu/vuestra/o. Su for usted/ustedes, tu for tú/vos and vuestra/o for vosotros.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saleemkhwaja

when to use esta and when to estar

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elinepje
elinepje
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I wondered about that myself. I found this very useful: http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/serest1.htm Basically, "ser" is used to describe an essential quality of something (which can not change), and "estar" is used to describe the condition of something (which can change). So... Soy Eline y estoy bien :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jamila818402

For some reason I am not making the connection with estar in this sentence. Why estar?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicolasBru467692

I think it should be, "Right now, I cannot be at your house."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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"I am not able to be at your house now" was accepted. Right now would probably sound better.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ocastillo9

it could be "Now I cannot be at your house" ???

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BPS-PenuelO

Besides "estar" meaning "am," "is," and "are," I now see another reason "estar" actually means "to be." Thus, the translation is "Now I can't be at your house."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/waltrer
waltrer
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he can be a bad person el puede ser una mala persona

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/12345679u
12345679u
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Maybe He/she couldn't go to their mates house cause they carried scissors in their bags.Lol:)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joseph79050

Home and house are the same thing

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarkVoice
DarkVoice
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Sus padres lleguen pronto.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TonyJones12

Another stupid sentance...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nihongoneko14
Nihongoneko14
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Si, porque tu estola mi dinero

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heimartti

la casa = home should be accepted (thats what I learned in my Spanish class)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Whose home would you be referring to? What you will see on DL is 'a casa' and 'a la casa" referring to home. You can always report it but I think many have and it has not been changed.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nihongoneko14
Nihongoneko14
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Heimartti, no, la casa means the house and casa by itself means house. "We can't be at your the house" Doesn't make any sense. If you want more information on that, look at this website. http://spanish.about.com/od/adjectives/a/intro_def_art.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tierraaa_

this is stupid

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nihongoneko14
Nihongoneko14
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Por que?

3 years ago