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"De slechte olie is niet lekker."

Translation:The bad oil is not tasty.

3 years ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TheRniz

If you eat oil, there's something wrong with you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnWycliffe
JohnWycliffe
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I cook in olive, coconut or corn oil and it affects the flavor (especially if it's extra virgin or unrefined).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jessy292950
Jessy292950
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but if your oil is bad then your oliebollen wil be bad!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jane-Chan20th

And bad oil is not good.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/md63157

I recommend eating 1 tsp of coconut oil daily. Best fat out there.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/.S.P.Q.R.
.S.P.Q.R.
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That's why you buy only Greek oil.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jane-Chan20th

Ελευερια η θανατος

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CyrilofAlabama

I know the pronunciation of the Dutch "r" can't and shouldn't be discussed in-depth in this one thread, but the "r" at the end of "lekker" here sounds more like an American English "r" than I've heard anywhere else thus far in the Dutch course. I know there are regional variations ranging from a more English-sounding "r" to a rolled "r" to a French-sounding "r."

I've generally been using a flap (as I think it's called) in my Dutch pronunciation, although I perhaps should change this habit since it seems it may not be a good way to go about it. Curious as to any thoughts from native speakers as to how normal the pronunciation of "lekker" sounds here and how you might pronounce it?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nick861298

To me it sounds like most R sounds are very soft in Dutch, at least in the Duolingo course. Check out the "Shopping" lessons and listen to the word procent.... I couldn't hear the R sound at all!

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MauduitDavid

Why does the pronunciation of "slechte" is not the same alone and in the whole sentence? When we ear it alone the "CH" sounds like en "F" but in the whole sentence it sounds more like a "R".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Davidesplo

It is [x], if I am correct. That is a velar unvoiced fricative. English has none, but does have another unvoiced fricative that sounds alike to you: [f]. I guess that's it.

If it sounds like an <r> ,as you suggest, I am guessing something like [ʁ] or [χ]. These are uvular, but fricatives too. Yes, they sound a lot like [x].

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Siddhartha96543

What's the difference between slecht and slechte?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/acastilloflores
acastilloflores
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Slechte is to be written before de-nouns, or before plurals. Slechte is with no noun or before an het-noun.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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"Slecht" without the -e ending is used without a noun after a form of the verb "to be", like "is", "ben", "bent" or "zijn". "Dat is slecht." "Slecht" is also used with the indefinite form of a het word, for example with "een", "geen" or no article "een schlect meisje"; but "slechte" is used when the definite article "het" is used with the het word. "Het slechte meisje

"De slechte man"

"Een slechte man"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/incirrina

Would spoilt not be an acceptable translation for slechte here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Just because there's sometimes overlap between two words, that does not mean they are synonymous. Right now, Duo wants you to learn that "slecht(e)" means "bad".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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I think oil has a sell by date so I think this is an understandable interpretation. Whether it's a good translation of the Dutch is another matter. By the way, what's the $/lingot exchange rate?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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What?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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There are a lot of words in that sentence and 'what' doesn't specify a part of speech so I do wonder what typing this adds to '?'. In short, What 'what?'? Actually, if the initial message stumps you, I imagine your reply to be insufficient so just ignore me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tabz6

So in one sentence I found that it has 'slecht' and this one has 'slechte'. Why is there a difference?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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In one case, the adjective is part of a noun phrase and in another, the adjective is the subject complement:
de slechte olie vs de olie is slecht

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TimothyWai2

Am I correct to say that you put 'niet' before an adjective, and after an object?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnWycliffe
JohnWycliffe
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It's more complicated than that. If you want to negate a verb in a complex sentence with time, manner or place, it can be placed in either of two positions depending on what you want to stress. Consider the following example:

Ik ren vandaag niet, omdat het weer niet goed is = I'm not running today because the weather is not good. Ik ren niet vandaag, maar morgen = I'm not running today, but tomorrow.

When it comes at the end of a simple sentence/clause, it negates the whole sentence/clause. When you want to stress that it's not [something], it is inserted at the front of the "middle" part (the middle contains time/manner/place, and sometimes direct/indirect object, if you want to specify that it's not Denmark that you went to but Belgium, or not Willem that you gave something, but Saskia). Notice also the placement of the second niet in the first sentence. Here, it comes before the adjective it negates. This would also be the case if it were the first clause or a standalone sentence. IE, when negating an adjective or adverb, niet is placed before that which it modifies. But when negating a verb, it goes after the verb, but it's specific placement can depend on what you want to stress.

In the sentence from the lesson, it negates the adjective lekker, so it goes before, as you correctly stated. But it doesn't always go after the object when it negates a verb.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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Is the final "e" in "slechte" supposed to be pronounced? This is the second sentence I just got wrong because he doesn't say it quickly but he does say it slowly. I haven't yet learnt the rule that allintolearning explained so well, so at the moment I rely on hearing it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Forvo.com is a good place to listen to a variety of native speakers pronounce words. They probably have both "slecht" and "slechte" that you can compare.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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They only have "slechte" and "in slechte staat" and the "e" can be heard in both of them, so I think the pronunciation on Duolingo is bad (slechte!).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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I just asked a friend of mine, who's a native Dutch speaker, and he says you always pronounce that "e".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
Mod
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At normal speed it does say slechte, though realise that there's a natural flow that kind of connects slechte and olie. Hence it may be harder to hear.

Also if you didn't hear the e you should know that it should be De slechte olie. Since a definite article is used.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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I am aware of the rule and I used to know it but then I stopped doing Dutch for six months and I forgot how it works. Until I relearn it, i.e. I can remember it without prompting, I rely on the audio.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IrisAmigo1

Someone could explain why some words we have to use "de", and others "het?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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All masculine and feminine words use "de". All neuter words use "het" in the singular. All plural words use "de".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShikerWolf

pff, is any kind of 'tasty' by itself?!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Sesame oil.

1 year ago