"Ahora puedes demostrar quién eres."

Translation:Now you can show who you are.

August 6, 2013

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthfuzzball

Why "demostrar" rather than "mostrar"? Are the two used in different contexts?

August 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NominusJPG

"Demostrar" is more like showing but with reasons.

November 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rlamborn

So, more like "explaining" or "demonstrating" or "justifying" or "proving"?

April 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Usagiboy7

"Now you can show me who you're" I've never seen "you're" at the end of a sentence. Must be something people say elsewhere.

November 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AurosHarman

Contracting "you are" there is illegal in both British and American English, as far as I know; if it's accepting that, it should be reported as an error.

August 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrandenSpe

now you can show me who you really are but i also heard this phrase used before

July 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/herekittykitty99

Yeah... it totally doesn't work.

June 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CeeCeeSong

you're right, it is NEVER the last word of a sentence.

January 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phthalo_

Exactly. You will not hear anyone say "you're" at the end of the sentence.

July 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/butter-buddha

How come quién does have an accent here despite being in the middle of the sentence? I've seen this quite a lot of times with qué/que and cuándo/cuando

August 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GarethViejoLento

There is an implied question here.... along the lines of "people are asking 'who are you?' and now you can show them"

August 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoySlater

I think it's supposed to be a matter of context. When with an accent, it tends to be a question and used towards the beginning. Whereas without the accent it's used more for statements. So like: "When will you come home?" (the cuando would have an accent), but if its a response "I'll come when I come." (it won't need the accent)

That's my theory anyway.

July 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WilliamtheIII

Sounds like the final moments of a Scooby-doo episode. ¿Como se dice la siguiente cita en espanol? "And I would have gotten away with it too if it weren't for you meddling kids".

March 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/szalaiak

Although I believe I have a good command of english I tend to get these kinds of sentences wrong. I wrote " You can show NOW who you are" . What's wrong with this particular word order? Just doesn't feel right?

October 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karimagon

Don't really know the exact reason either, but I think English just tends to put those kinds of words that signify time (now, later, yesterday, etc.) at either the end or the beginning of the sentence, but not in the middle. It sounds awkward in the middle. So both "now you can show who you are" and "you can show who you are now" are fine, but not with the "now" before the object clause.

November 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/szalaiak

Thanks guys!

November 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph516503

Personally, I think it sounds fine with Now at the beginning of the sentence or at the end... possibly even before the word show. But for some reason it just sounds slightly odd after the "show". I'm afraid I don't know the grammatical reason for this... as you say, it just feels wrong.

November 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itsmesd

Hola szalaiak: I think that the grammatical reason is that your word order sort of turns "now" into the object of the verb "show" which would make sense if it was "George" but doesn't make sense with "now" . "You can show George who you are" but you cannot show "now" who you are.

May 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phthalo_

As well as "you now can show who you are," or "you can now show who you are" :)

July 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mohrchen

Nightwatch! Come out of the shadows!

August 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rexkatwa

Ahora puedes demonstrar a quien comes. (I mistped ARE as ATE)

April 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rexkatwa

misspelled mispelled

April 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rexkatwa

aaagh, did it again

April 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/longtry

I guess Marshmallow is the only one who hears this sentence frequently.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Suziemalt

Now you can demostrate who you are? Why is that wrong?

August 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karimagon

It's a bit awkward. I can't really explain why, but "show" is much more natural in this case.

I suppose the closest explanation would be that "showing" implies being and "demonstrating" implies doing. So you demonstrate how to do something, but you show how something is.

August 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fluent2B

That is a well made distinction.

Btw, there is no such word as "demostrate" in the English language.

September 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CeeCeeSong

demonstrate, yes there is. Just a typo, and it accepts typos 50/50. Sometimes I actually make a mistake, and it accepts it as a typo! Other times I will accidentally leave off one letter after perfectly translating the entire sentence and it will mark it wrong! I haven't figured out what the system is yet.

January 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Suziemalt

Thanks.......sort of understand!

September 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CeeCeeSong

That is EXACTLY what I put, and it was marked correct. I just jumped onto this particular discussion, because it feels wrong not to add "really" into the sentence. In English, we would always say, "who you really are."

January 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CeeCeeSong

We would almost certainly say, "who you really are," not just "who you are."

January 26, 2018
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