"Eu peço que você não use o telefone aqui."

Translation:I ask you not to use the phone here.

August 6, 2013

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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This sentence, as written using "ask" , is classic mandative subjunctive (used frequently in US-Eng and to a lesser extent in Br-Eng).

It's an order more than a request. I ask that you not use the phone here. The negative subjunctive requires placing "not" before the bare infinitive. No need for the preposition "to".

April 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/freddiefranks
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My take on this sentence: it's based on a simple idea: "don't use your phone here". If one wants to be polite, the imperative typically feels too blunt, which is how we end up with convolutions like this sentence, where we rephrase it so it seems more polite. Since the point is the exact opposite of brevity, I'd argue there are many ways you could translate this phrase.

August 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/VandeirGontijo

Why my answer wasn't accepted "I ask for you that do not use the phone here"?

November 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Davu
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I'm afraid it simply doesn't make much sense. It is possibly better to translate literally and then sort out the English. In fact, the literal translation works without change: "I ask that you not use the telephone here" even though it sounds slightly stilted.

November 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/VandeirGontijo

Thank you for the explanation. Be always blessed in Jesus name!

November 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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Oh, for heaven's sake!

April 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
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You know what Sean (my GPS voice) would say about dat!

April 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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Dat would probably depend on his religious affiliation. Se ele disser "dat" e o nome dele é Sean...

April 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JFSPA

Idiomatic and comprehensible ways to express this: I ask for you not to use the phone here. I ask that you (do) not use the phone here. I am asking you not to use the phone here. Please do not use the phone here.

April 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RafaelReges
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My answer was correct with: "I ask you to not use the phone here". how common is this way?

January 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulBelme

It works. Sounds a bit odd, but it's an odd phrase, we have no context

April 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
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Your sentence is wrong because you split the infinitive "to use" with "not". I'm afraid it is, grammatically speaking, a capital offense. Luckily the ultimate punishment has not been reinstated for this offence. If it were, there would be pratically nobody left alive in the English speaking world.

It's a common mistake.

June 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/freddiefranks
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Nah, split infinitives are fine.

August 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/miaumaomi

Split infinitives are fine in English. This is a myth.

April 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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Subjunctive tense: I ask that you not use the phone. (formal and more often heard in the first person plural as a request to the general public: We ask that you not...

April 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/J-Martinez66
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Sounds like something a teacher would ask their students

May 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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DL's sentence would sound more natural if the main verb were in the past tense. I asked you not to use the phone here.

The sentence can also be translated with the "that complement": "I ask that you not use the phone here." Formal (subjunctive) still used in the US - more so than in the UK, apparently.

The Teacher's Grammar of English - R.Cowan

June 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
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In the UK, the "yoof" of today may look at you like a stunned rabbit, but your sentence strikes me as clearly elegant.

It looks fine to my UK sensibilities.

June 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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Yoof....it took me a while to get that....have they really forgotten the "th" sound?

June 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
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Mostly depends on the regional accent, and how much the speaker wants to be understood. I did have some trouble in understanding occasionally some of the younger, i.e. 20s or so, natural English speakers in my home town.

There's a sort of style of speaking that deliberately suppresses consonants, a real shock to me. I no longer live in the UK, nor in an anglophone country, I was very surprised.

June 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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Are you referring to the "glottal stop" which Tony "retired in affluent disgrace" Blair adopted a few years ago? An unattractive evolution for English....coitado de nosso idioma!

June 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
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Ah, yes, Tony Blair, well you mustn't talk too proper like, else 'ey'll think yera toff, innit?

Yes, I didn't know that way of turning a hard "t" into a sort of aspirated blast (butter-bu'uh) had a name. I also read it as glottal slop, which struck me as more appropriate ;-)

I had not seen "o coitado" before, interesting to use in this context?

June 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/magictimelord

I used "do not" instead of "don't" and it was marked wrong. Really?

August 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/anachron

Works now.

June 4, 2014
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