"Han dör!"

Translation:He is dying!

January 31, 2015

52 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Jugglern0t

What a morbid way to start this lesson

January 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Lundgren8

Gotta keep you alert!

January 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurelCook2

I had one that said "They call us if she dies tonight."

Whoever suggested that has experienced one too many pets in the hospital.

January 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/katt64

De ringer oss om hon dör i natt.

March 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielLuna729625

The doctor says: "Call me if he is dying" ("Ring mig om han dör") and the person understands "Call me if he dies".

June 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/valiendomother

That is a very good point! How do natives remark the difference between those two sentences?

December 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sotnosen93

"Dying" as an adjective is translated as "döende". Just like the English word, it's the present participle of "to die".

January 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/HoroTanuki

She sounds really bored about someone dying...

February 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/VarHyid

She's a robot.

June 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas407435

Statement: The meatbag is dying.

June 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/captain-Autism0

low automated mechanical voice

we machines are far superior to you pathetic humans, surrender while you still can, resistance is futile.

July 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MesutS1

Is it pronounced "dor" or "dör" like in "björn"? TTS sounds like "dor"

March 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

It's the same Ö sound as i björn.

May 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/fraumueller

Han är död, Jim

February 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ClockworkElf

"He is dying" and "he dies" have very different meanings. How can they both be correct?

February 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

They both translate to "han dör", since Swedish doesn't make the present continuous distinction that English does.

February 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MitchLindgren

Thanks. I didn't even know that "present continuous" was a verb tense, being a native English speaker and having studied only French and Swedish. I have been wondering about this for a while.

June 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

Studying new languages makes you learn quite a lot about the ones you already know as well, I've found. :)

June 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/IgelkottenMili

Min svensk lärare säger till mig att jag vill använda "present cont.", jag måste ha 2 verben ihop.

August 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

What do you mean?

August 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Fresh99012

Maybe there's a construction that emulates continuous?

August 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Anrui
Mod
  • 5

You could actually make a distinction here in Swedish. If you want to say that a person is in a state where (s)he is slowly dying you could say; Hen är döende, but if you want to say that this person is about to die quite soon, then you would say; Hen dör

July 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MitchLindgren

Interesting. In this case, döende is an adjective rather than a conjugation of the verb dö, right? Also, what does "hen" mean? I assume it's like "he or she" but I haven't seen it before and Google Translate doesn't recognize it.

July 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Anrui
Mod
  • 5

Yes.

Hen is a non-gender pronoun that could be used either when you do not know the gender of the person, or if a person does not identify with any specific gender.

July 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MitchLindgren

Thanks. Out of curiosity, is hen a neologism?

July 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Anrui
Mod
  • 5

"Hen" has been around for a few years now and it is constantly gaining more ground in Sweden. Nowadays it is even used in newspaper articles and in news reports on TV. There obviously seems to be a need for the word in Sweden.

July 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Heidijan

It's from the Finnish pronoun "hän" of the same meaning, I think.

November 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Malgosia007

In case of "hen", would you say i.e. "hans hund" or "hennes hund"?

June 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

hens
Here's a link to a great post about hen: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/15916853

July 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ra272785

@Anrui. Addition. I suppose that the present continuous can sometimes express: 'hålla på med' (be+verb+ing). But this is not the best example. 'Han håller på med att döda'.(?) Maybe it insists a verb which describes more active doing, like 'bada' or 'simma'? (He is swimming) 'Han håller på med att bada'. That is not so common way to express than English present continuous. -ESL-:)

January 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Ra272785

Att dö = to die, att döda = to kill, of course! I meant the former...Lol.

January 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/MujjinGun

How do you say "he passed away"?

July 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Anrui
Mod
  • 5

You can say "die" in many ways. But to match the feeling for passed away i would suggest either

Gick bort (Gå bort - Gick bort - Gått bort)
Avled (Avlida - Avled - Avlidit)

July 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Sofi-RW

I need the accusative form of this... it's, uh... for... you know, scientific research

May 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Anrui
Mod
  • 5

Accusative? How do you mean?

May 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Sofi-RW

How do you say "you die!"?... or something like that. In Spanish you'd say "morite". Perks of not being a native.

edit like, being aggressive

May 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Anrui
Mod
  • 5

Oh! The imperative!

Dö!

May 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael990548

So would Now you die! be Nu dö du! or just Nu dö!

March 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

We want the verb to come first in commands: Dö nu! (it is not correct to put Nu first here)
It's also possible to say Nu dör du! but that's not the command form of the verb, only the present tense. So it could mean either 'Now you die!' or 'Now you're dying!' in English.

March 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/BlakeHasz

You would have to specify du/ni to say now you die! since verbs don't conjugate based on who is performing/recieving the action. Dö nu! would just be now die!

March 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Sofi-RW

Oh, oh! *Tack! I messed them up, sorry.

May 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Anrui
Mod
  • 5

No problem :) Just be careful with the dots and rings, "Tack" is written with an a and not å

July 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/chriscadma1

Now I'm confused. What is the difference between 'He is dying' (e.g. he is ill and is going to die soon), and 'He is dead' (it's already happened). Thanks.

October 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

Han dör means 'He's dying/He dies'
Han är döende means 'He's dying' (='ill and going to die soon, in the process of dying')
Han är död means 'He's dead'

October 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MaxBeck.SWE

The way she* emphasizes the word "dör" makes me laugh, it's as if she is a character in a bad soap opera. This makes me wonder, is this the correct way to emphasize speech in Swedish?

December 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/sotnosen93

In this case it's pretty much like the English. If you put more emphasis on "dör" you're emphasising that he is dying, but if you put more emphasis on "han" you're emphasising that he specifically is dying.

January 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Lilja652023

Oh no

March 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rebecca737642

I hate swipe sometimes. I tried to swipe dör, and i got får, för, före, där, and for before i gave up and typed it in.

April 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielLuna729625

If "Han dör" = "He dies/He is dying". How can I say in Sweedish: "HE IS DYING, just a few more minutes and HE DIES."

In portuguese "ele morre" (he dies) can also mean "he is mortal" or "he have the ability/possibility to die", not necessarily that he is dying at this time. In Swedish can I use "Han dör" meaning this? If yes, how can I differ "He dies, so she could kill him" (she can kill him because he is mortal) and "He is dying, so she could kill him" (will be easy for she to kill him because he is weak and almost dead)?

June 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sotnosen93

"Dying" used as an adjective to refer to someone being near death has already been covered. "Mortal" translates to "dödlig" in Swedish.

January 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/ColorOMagic

i'm not dying! i did not sleep for 4 days

January 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/EsperantoEddie

:-(

February 9, 2019
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