"Tá an gairdín ar oscailt don phobal inniu."

Translation:The garden is open to the public today.

3 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Schaf333
Schaf333
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Why is she saying "inniubh"? At least that's what I hear.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/littleowljrn

That's what I hear.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElCunado

The phrase 'the garden is open for the public today' should also be accepted too, no?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

do wouldn't be used for "for" in that sense. I think le haghaidh would be better.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeffWigley

But translation is never a word-for-word exercise, especially when prepositions are involved. In the US, at least, we'll say "for the public" as often as "to the public", meaning exactly the same thing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conmanq
conmanq
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Could this not be "The garden is opening to the public today"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilmolleggi
ilmolleggi
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Why is it ar oscailt instead of simply oscailt? Is this an idiomatic use or is there a category of adjectives that take ar before them like maith takes go?

Also if not a whole category is there a parellel in "close"? Like "ar dúnadh" or "ar dúnta" or something?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/e_fein
e_fein
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I'm curious if she is pronouncing "don" similar to "dhon".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

You have a good ear, but it's not actually dhon.

It's a feature of Connacht Irish that the preposition do is pronounced as if it were writtengo.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/littleowljrn

In the second half of that sentence it says that “do” lenites, which means they were hearing it as “dhon.”

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

"do lenites" means that the word that follows do is lenited.

That's why it's don phobal rather than don pobal or don bpobal.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/e_fein
e_fein
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I agree that it sounds more like "g" than "dh". Thanks for the tip on Connacht pronunciation. When I was just starting to learn Irish, I was using a book in which the combined (inflected?) forms of "do" were actually lenited in spelling (eg dhuit, dhoibh). I don't know what dialect that was, but of course it's not standard spelling.

3 months ago
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