"Jag är inte full."

Translation:I am not drunk.

February 1, 2015

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Synthpopalooza

Hilarious also, that "full" in Swedish also means "drunk".

March 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

If you mean 'full' as in after a filling meal, that is mätt in Swedish, full does not have that meaning.

March 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trevro

What about things other than people? Like "the glass is full" or "the gas tank is full".

April 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Then you would use full. Glaset är fullt, bensintanken är full.

May 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trevro

Thank you!

May 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hoyunmyoun

Then, "mätt är fullt." ?

March 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

I don't understand what you mean, could you clarify?

May 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hoyunmyoun

Sorry, I mistyped a lot. I was saying "mätt" means 'full' in English? such as.. when you say "I'm full." & "The bus is full."..

May 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thorr18

No. "Mätt" is only used to mean full like satiated with a belly full. Swedish "full" is used to refer to everything else like "The bus is full", with the exception of when it is used to refer to a person. That is when it means "drunk" instead.

May 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/koen.dewil

Also people, don´t mix this up with "ful", which means ugly.

To answer your question: yes, I have said "jag är ful" before.

June 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Synthpopalooza

To prevent that misunderstanding ... I always associate "ful" (one l) with the English word "foul" which i think may be a cognate.

June 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/henmcb

And this proves you right.

July 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/r9k-luxetveritas

What's the best way to make that distinction?

August 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PJamesM

See Zmrzlina's response to ceciliabertol's similar question elsewhere in this thread. "Ful" has a longer vowel than "full".

September 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patti309623

i thought the u sounded long in this example. it doesn't go quickly to the ll

June 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HoroTanuki

How would one say "I am not full", as in 'I can still eat'?

February 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

"Jag är inte mätt"

February 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ceciliabertol

How can I understand the difference just hearing the two words "ful" and "full"? Because in this case I spelled it wrong

August 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

The vowel. It's short in full but long in ful. You can hear sound examples of them here and here.

August 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SunnySundquist

Those are excellent discernable differences. Sometimes the voice on duolingo is not as discernable. I'll explore that site for other pronunciations. One of the most difficult for me is simply finding the best pronunciation of ''är''. I hear it so many different ways.

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimothyAspeslagh

How do people distinguish full with drunk? context?

March 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

full in Swedish (about people) only means 'drunk', it does not mean 'satisfied' as in 'has eaten enough'. That would be mätt.

March 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErixTheRed

Would "jag är full av mat" ever be said or is it awkward? Like after Thanksgiving I'm not just no longer hungry, I am literally full to the brim with food.

May 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

It's not grammatically wrong, but it sounds strange. A Swede might say "jag är jättemätt" or something like that, I think.

May 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/person222222

"Drunk" in this sense can only mean "intoxicated", right?

September 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChloKokx

Yes.

November 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dragongirl253

wait. so does "full" (at LEAST phonetically) mean drunk, full, AND ugly? ???

January 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

No, full (drunk) has a short u and a long l sound, whereas ful (ugly) has a long u and a short l sound. The difference is very clear to a native speaker.

January 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Normordm

I'm not drunk occifer hiccup

May 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Owlspotting

Drunks always say that.

On the other hand, has anyone else noticed that stoners never deny that they're stoned? Quite the opposite: they delight in sharing the fact to anyone within earshot.

June 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rafaello201673

I am not English nor Swedish, but I study both of them. My translation was: "I am not drunken", and it wasn't accepted by Duo. My dictionary gives "drunken" and "drunk" as the English equivalents for the Swedish "full"

January 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PJamesM

As a native English speaker (but not an expert), I'd say that the adjective "drunken" requires an object. In other words, you can say "what shall we do with the drunken sailor", but not "what shall we do with the sailor who is drunken".

In general, "drunken" isn't really used in modern English outside of set phrases like the song I quoted. Stick with "drunk" in all cases and you should be fine.

January 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rafaello201673

Thanks for your clarification

January 27, 2019
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