1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Italian
  4. >
  5. "Io bevo la mia zuppa."

"Io bevo la mia zuppa."

Translation:I drink my soup.

August 7, 2013

48 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zchbaniel25

Not to sound weird, a better translation might be "I eat my soup" .

An Italian, I suppose, is so used to refer the swallowing of soup as drinking, that he has no habit of observing whether or not you use a spoon (maybe even a knife and a fork for the cheese crust bits) - as long as what he sees is something he would describe as soup, the action is "drinking" .

In the same way the action for English eyes would be "eating" as long as it is a soup at all and not a broth or a juice.

The word-by-word translation sounds like something weird happening.

Correct me if I am wrong.

Still I usually stick to word-by-word translations not to get too many hearts taken away.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heppsi

They seem to have listened to you :)!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thebreef

Is it indeed the more common expression in italy to say: "i drink my soup" instead of "i eat my soup""?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charmaine_E

you are not wrong. the translations should not be literal otherwise what's the point.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Breann126407

I wrote, " i eat my soup." and it accepted it as a correct answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alefe007

Yeah, you're right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KimJiHeon

Is "la" even necessary when there's already "mia"? Correct me if I'm wrong... but isn't weird to say "I drink the my soup"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/josh.romano

Its just part of the language, it doesn't translate perfectly to English. Every time you use the possessive in Italian, it must be followed by an article (for example, la mia mela, il mio cane, etc.)

One exception to this is using possessives to refer to family members (for example, 'my mother' would translate to 'mia madre', and NOT 'la mia madre')


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ofred19

I'm confused because in the question I got before this the phrase was "Il cavallo non è mio". Why was there no article in that case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/josh.romano

I could be wrong, but i think the "Il" at the beginning of the sentence satisfies the needed article; to say "il cavallo non è il mio" is redundant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReginaldPhilips

I think the difference in that particular case is the difference between my and mine. "Il mio cane" is "My dog" and "il cane è mio" is "the dog is -mine-."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ketutsf

That might be a useful way to think about it, but it would be misleading in many cases.

The operative rule here is that the article ("il" in this case) is optional when the possessive adjective is alone as a predicate. That is, when the sentence (in Italian) has the form

subject + conj. of essere + possesive adj.

So your rule would work for

"Il gato è mio." = "the cat is mine."

"Il gato è tuo" = "the cat is yours."

But it would be wrong for

"Vedo il mio." = "I see mine."

"Vedete la vostra." = "You see yours."

"Lei prende il mio." = "She takes mine."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ketutsf

Also, the moderator f.formica has pointed out that this my vs. mine idea is incorrect. He says:

In principle it's the opposite: "il mio" is a pronoun (my one / mine) and "mio" is an adjective (my). But as the adjective usually requires the article in Italian, you can only really notice that as a predicate, while English forbids "my" as a predicate.

--f.formica


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gmchiquito123

It kind of sounds like Spanish when we say "El caballo no es el mio" which would literally be The horse is not the mine." That seems to relate to Italian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenJamieso

It's just a specific case - look at the "Tips & notes" section for details.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/makrzor

What section? Where??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

If you use the web interface, you can see the tips and notes after clicking on a skill and before selecting one of the tasks in that skill.

If you're using a mobile app... check the web interface from time to time! The tips and notes aren't available in the app, as far as I know, and that's a big pity!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16

I have noticed that every sentence has the article before the possessive pronoun so I guess i'ts needed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LouMimzy

I don't use a spoon in my tomato soup I just drink it so I guess it's like that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gaio_2000

I accidently typed "I drink my soul," and learned the importance of revision.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikFish2882

Now, how do you say, "I drink your milkshake"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ketutsf

That would be, "Ho già rubato tutto del vostro olio."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TonyCulliford

Would "Io bevo la zuppa mia" also be correct here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamKevin

Do we use "mia" because of "la" or what ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/moxiemeg23

You use "la mia" because "zuppa" is feminine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZEEV55

Mia=mine La mia=my ???????????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaggiePye

Exactly. "È la mia zuppa" = "It is my soup." "La zuppa è mia" = "The soup is mine."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ketutsf

That might be a useful way to think about it, but it would be misleading in many cases.

The operative rule here is that the article ("il" in this case) is optional when the possessive adjective is alone as a predicate. That is, when the sentence (in Italian) has the form

subject + conj. of essere + possesive adj.

So the "mine" rule would work for

"Il gato è mio." = "the cat is mine."

"Il gato è tuo" = "the cat is yours."

But it would be wrong for

"Vedo il mio." = "I see mine."

"Vedete la vostra." = You see yours."

"Lei prende il mio." = "She takes mine."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ketutsf

Also, the moderator f.formica has pointed out that this my vs. mine idea is incorrect. He says:

In principle it's the opposite: "il mio" is a pronoun (my one / mine) and "mio" is an adjective (my). But as the adjective usually requires the article in Italian, you can only really notice that as a predicate, while English forbids "my" as a predicate.

--f.formica


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LorraineAT2

The microphone feature rarely works for me, though im pronouncing correctly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.F.aazam

Confused in mio and mia plz correct when to use mia and when mio


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Use "mia" when the thing you have is feminine: la mia zuppa, la mia fragola, la mia cucina, ...

Use "mio" when the thing you have is masculine: il mio libro, il mio cane, il mio bicchiere, ...

All things in Italian are either masculine or feminine, and you have to learn the gender along with the word. You can usually tell by the ending, though: -o is masculine, -a is feminine. I think -e can be either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/geceningolgesi

its beginin to be hard!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Grace636353

In the sentence dint they have la and isnt la, the?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ketutsf

In the sentence "Io bevo la mia zuppa," the word "la" is part of the possessive adjective "la mia" = "my." With some important exceptions, Italian possessive pronouns, such as "mio," "tua," "suoi" and "nostre," are used with definite articles:

  • "il mio" = "my" (masc. singular)
  • "la tua" = "your" (fem. singular)
  • "i suoi" = "his/her" (masc. plural)
  • "le nostre" = "our" (fem. plural)

Here are a couple links:

http://italian.about.com/library/fare/blfare132a.htm
http://italian.about.com/od/grammar/a/italian-possessive-pronouns.htm

The first one has a nice chart, but neither says enough about the exceptions to the use of definite articles with possessive pronouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JiMmyPerge

Why mia zuppa is not the same with mio zuppa?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because one is right (la mia zuppa) and one is wrong (il mio zuppa).

zuppa is feminine grammatically and so it needs the feminine ending on adjectives that describe it, including possessive adjectives such as il mio, la mia.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TinaHallam

I don't understand why I have to put "io", it is unnecessary. My family fluently speaks Italian and I very very rarely hear them say io, tu, lui/lei, noi, voi or loro because the verb is conjugated to that saying. Like " Bevo il mio te' ", bevo is already conjugated to "I drink".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sfaour

can't it be "I drink my OWN soup"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bluebunny84ppg

Note to self: Italians drink soup, they do not eat it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uselink

I haven't said anything and still awarded by correct answer.

Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.