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"Heeft ze een klomp?"

Translation:Does she have a clog?

3 years ago

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/talkinears

what's a clog?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenBergy2

A clog is one of those wierd wooden curved "elf shoes" commonly worn in European countries/regions

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Science_Yay

The clog is only common in the Netherlands and parts of Flanders but not in the rest of Europe

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NellyLusch
NellyLusch
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Commonly worn in Alsace until rather recently, just saying...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ister14
Ister14
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As an everyday footwear no. And wooden no. But rubber/plastic clogs are also popular on sand beaches and got bath in unknown places (to protect your feet)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/allenfrang

For some reason clogs are called "suecos" in Spanish, but I've no idea wheher they were ever used in Sweden

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Actually, clogs in Spanish is *zuecos, *suecos are Swedish men. Thus, these words are not really related afaik.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marquigonzalo
marquigonzalo
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It is not "suecos" in Spanish. It is "zuecos".

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElCoronelEsponja

Clogs are also worn along the east coast of England, i.e. the areas which traded with the Low Countries most frequently. They're particularly associated with the county of Yorkshire.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CaitlinApril

"She has a clog"? should be acceptable as "Has she a clog"? is not the way it is spoken in english

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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"Has she a clog?" is common in British English, which is why we accept it (and only after much complaining from our British users!).

We do not accept questions phrased as statements, like "She has a clog?".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eyq0
Eyq0
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I frequently construct questions like this using intonation to denote a questions, which is why it should be accepted. There is no reason why questions phrased as statements should not be accepted as this is commonplace.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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I'm afraid I'll have to disagree with you: there's no way the algorithm or whatever it's called (sorry, not my field) can interpret whether you meant to type a question or a statement. In speech we get to phrase questions as statements because we rely on intonation to convey the 'question-status' of our utterance, as you said. But when typing, you cannot encode in your typed/written words intonation nor your intention... Thus, I disagree.

Hope this helps.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatRod20

She has a clog?... that is not how questions are constructed in English.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Loganistan

American English would translate this as "She has a clog?" or "Does she have a clog?". I've never heard anyone say "Has she a _ ?".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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Apparently it is a British thing! "Does she have a clog?" is also accepted, of course.

However, we do not accept questions phrased as statements, like "She has a clog?". I think this has something to do with Duolingo not recognizing punctuation marks, or not doing intonation correctly, or something like that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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A British and Irish thing. I don't know what's wrong with the rest of you :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YYismyLanguage

We're not complaining that it is a British or an Irish thing. We're complaining because the way we(Americans) say it is correct way for us and should be a valid translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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I think Simius has already address why (rightly or wrongly) "She has a clog?" is not accepted. But I'm fairly certain that "Does she have a clog" is standard in American English anyway.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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The only time I've heard Americans asking "She has a clog?" type questions I could hear the added exclamation mark and the shriek of incredulity. This structure does seem to be used where added emphasis or disbelief is implied. Otherwise, I would expect to hear "Does she have a clog?" structures. Can any of our American cousins confirm this impression?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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I agree with you, Sean Maney (sorry, ataltane, it's too nested for me to be able to reply to Sean directly).

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kenny263763
Kenny263763
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Why ze and not zij? what is the difference?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahLinn1

would get weird looks if this was said in the states, why it is confusing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HappyCuteAF
HappyCuteAF
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How do we tell the difference in pronunciation of "ze" and "zij"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbunPang
AbunPang
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It’s rather unfortunate that the plural verb form in my dialect of Low German ends in “-t” (“wi/ji/se hefft” = we/you/they have)… Hard to overcome the initial impulse to interprete it as plural.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NinjaJinja

Is it me or is tge audio on klomp kind of hilarious? She sounds startled or like someone pushed her and she lost her balance while saying it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stripedkitty
stripedkitty
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No, it's not you-- it is funny, now that you mention it ;) It's...the KLOMP!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/solveiga.k

There is a mistake in translation - it translates it to does she HAVE but it should be - does she HAS, right?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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No, "Does she have" is correct English. This construction uses the auxiliary verb "to do" (which is conjugated) and the infinitive form of "to have".

3 years ago