"Heeftzeeenklomp?"

Translation:Does she have a clog?

3 years ago

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/talkinears

what's a clog?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenBergy2

A clog is one of those wierd wooden curved "elf shoes" commonly worn in European countries/regions

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Science_Yay

The clog is only common in the Netherlands and parts of Flanders but not in the rest of Europe

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NellyLusch
NellyLusch
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Commonly worn in Alsace until rather recently, just saying...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElCoronelEsponja

Clogs are also worn along the east coast of England, i.e. the areas which traded with the Low Countries most frequently. They're particularly associated with the county of Yorkshire.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ister14
Ister14
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As an everyday footwear no. And wooden no. But rubber/plastic clogs are also popular on sand beaches and got bath in unknown places (to protect your feet)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/allenfrang

For some reason clogs are called "suecos" in Spanish, but I've no idea wheher they were ever used in Sweden

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Actually, clogs in Spanish is *zuecos, *suecos are Swedish men. Thus, these words are not really related afaik.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marquigonzalo
marquigonzalo
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It is not "suecos" in Spanish. It is "zuecos".

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gurungsuma1

Thanks for the clarification .

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CaitlinApril

"She has a clog"? should be acceptable as "Has she a clog"? is not the way it is spoken in english

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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"Has she a clog?" is common in British English, which is why we accept it (and only after much complaining from our British users!).

We do not accept questions phrased as statements, like "She has a clog?".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eyq0
Eyq0
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I frequently construct questions like this using intonation to denote a questions, which is why it should be accepted. There is no reason why questions phrased as statements should not be accepted as this is commonplace.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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I'm afraid I'll have to disagree with you: there's no way the algorithm or whatever it's called (sorry, not my field) can interpret whether you meant to type a question or a statement. In speech we get to phrase questions as statements because we rely on intonation to convey the 'question-status' of our utterance, as you said. But when typing, you cannot encode in your typed/written words intonation nor your intention... Thus, I disagree.

Hope this helps.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DamonNelso
DamonNelso
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In the US, questions are not normally in statement form.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatRod20

She has a clog?... that is not how questions are constructed in English.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Loganistan

American English would translate this as "She has a clog?" or "Does she have a clog?". I've never heard anyone say "Has she a _ ?".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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Apparently it is a British thing! "Does she have a clog?" is also accepted, of course.

However, we do not accept questions phrased as statements, like "She has a clog?". I think this has something to do with Duolingo not recognizing punctuation marks, or not doing intonation correctly, or something like that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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A British and Irish thing. I don't know what's wrong with the rest of you :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YYismyLanguage

We're not complaining that it is a British or an Irish thing. We're complaining because the way we(Americans) say it is correct way for us and should be a valid translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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I think Simius has already address why (rightly or wrongly) "She has a clog?" is not accepted. But I'm fairly certain that "Does she have a clog" is standard in American English anyway.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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The only time I've heard Americans asking "She has a clog?" type questions I could hear the added exclamation mark and the shriek of incredulity. This structure does seem to be used where added emphasis or disbelief is implied. Otherwise, I would expect to hear "Does she have a clog?" structures. Can any of our American cousins confirm this impression?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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I agree with you, Sean Maney (sorry, ataltane, it's too nested for me to be able to reply to Sean directly).

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kenny263763
Kenny263763
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Why ze and not zij? what is the difference?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheNecromancer10
From https://www.duolingo.com/skill/dn/stressed-pronouns/tips-and-notes
Note: I am not a moderator, nor am I a course contributor. I just have some spare time on my hands which I am using to format my comment.


Stressed and unstressed pronouns

Dutch knows two types of pronouns: stressed (or marked) and unstressed (or unmarked) pronouns. The difference lies in the fact that stressed pronouns, as suggested, receive emphasis whereas unstressed pronouns do not. The stressed and unstressed personal pronouns that are taught in this skill are listed below:

Dutch (unstressed/unmarked) Dutch (stressed/marked) English
Je Jij You (singular)
Ze Zij She, They
We Wij We

The other personal pronouns (ik, u, hij, het, and jullie) don’t have a different stressed and unstressed personal pronoun in written language. In speaking, there are other ways to denote emphasis for these (see below).

There are also stressed forms of certain object pronouns (me/mij, je/jou) and possessives (je/jouw*), but you will learn about those later.


When do we use marked pronouns?

Marked pronouns are less used than the unmarked ones, but they are important nonetheless. In some situations (such as comparisons) the meaning of the sentence forces you to emphasize the pronoun, so that it would be unnatural to use the unstressed form. This skill will demonstrate some of those cases, so that you can develop a feeling for this use of emphasis.

However, in most sentences the pronouns can be either stressed or unstressed, depending heavily on context and intonation. That is why in Duolingo exercises (which lack both of those), the two forms are usually interchangeable. The pronunciation is different though, so pay extra attention during listening exercises!


How do we emphasize the pronoun?

We use the stressed pronoun, as described above

When we emphasize the pronoun, we also increase our pitch

We tend to slightly increase our volume

In addition, the word is pronounced “longer” (its duration is stretched in comparison to that of the unmarked pronoun). In contrast, when you’re using an unmarked pronoun, you should emphasize another part of the sentence, like the verb or the object!


Stressed vs unstressed

Dutch English
Jij moet dat doen. You have to do that. (it's not my job)
Je moet dat doen. You have to do that. (and not something else)
Zij gaan naar huis. They are going home. (while we are staying here)
Ze gaan naar huis. They are going home. (and not downtown)
2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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That was very nice of you, Quentin.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbunPang
AbunPang
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It’s rather unfortunate that the plural verb form in my dialect of Low German ends in “-t” (“wi/ji/se hefft” = we/you/they have)… Hard to overcome the initial impulse to interprete it as plural.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahLinn1

would get weird looks if this was said in the states, why it is confusing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HappyCuteAF
HappyCuteAF
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How do we tell the difference in pronunciation of "ze" and "zij"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanetCynth1

Ze or zij? Difference?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheNecromancer10
From https://www.duolingo.com/skill/dn/stressed-pronouns/tips-and-notes
Note: I am not a moderator, nor am I a course contributor. I just have some spare time on my hands which I am using to format my comment.


Stressed and unstressed pronouns

Dutch knows two types of pronouns: stressed (or marked) and unstressed (or unmarked) pronouns. The difference lies in the fact that stressed pronouns, as suggested, receive emphasis whereas unstressed pronouns do not. The stressed and unstressed personal pronouns that are taught in this skill are listed below:

Dutch (unstressed/unmarked) Dutch (stressed/marked) English
Je Jij You (singular)
Ze Zij She, They
We Wij We

The other personal pronouns (ik, u, hij, het, and jullie) don’t have a different stressed and unstressed personal pronoun in written language. In speaking, there are other ways to denote emphasis for these (see below).

There are also stressed forms of certain object pronouns (me/mij, je/jou) and possessives (je/jouw*), but you will learn about those later.


When do we use marked pronouns?

Marked pronouns are less used than the unmarked ones, but they are important nonetheless. In some situations (such as comparisons) the meaning of the sentence forces you to emphasize the pronoun, so that it would be unnatural to use the unstressed form. This skill will demonstrate some of those cases, so that you can develop a feeling for this use of emphasis.

However, in most sentences the pronouns can be either stressed or unstressed, depending heavily on context and intonation. That is why in Duolingo exercises (which lack both of those), the two forms are usually interchangeable. The pronunciation is different though, so pay extra attention during listening exercises!


How do we emphasize the pronoun?

We use the stressed pronoun, as described above

When we emphasize the pronoun, we also increase our pitch

We tend to slightly increase our volume

In addition, the word is pronounced “longer” (its duration is stretched in comparison to that of the unmarked pronoun). In contrast, when you’re using an unmarked pronoun, you should emphasize another part of the sentence, like the verb or the object!


Stressed vs unstressed

Dutch English
Jij moet dat doen. You have to do that. (it's not my job)
Je moet dat doen. You have to do that. (and not something else)
Zij gaan naar huis. They are going home. (while we are staying here)
Ze gaan naar huis. They are going home. (and not downtown)
2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NinjaJinja

Is it me or is tge audio on klomp kind of hilarious? She sounds startled or like someone pushed her and she lost her balance while saying it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stripedkitty
stripedkitty
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No, it's not you-- it is funny, now that you mention it ;) It's...the KLOMP!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sonia376586

she is always with has! not with have

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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Unless there is an auxiliary verb like to do, then the auxiliary verb is conjugated and not to have.

  • She has
  • She does
  • Does she have?

https://www.englisch-hilfen.de/en/grammar/have.htm

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/solveiga.k

There is a mistake in translation - it translates it to does she HAVE but it should be - does she HAS, right?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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No, "Does she have" is correct English. This construction uses the auxiliary verb "to do" (which is conjugated) and the infinitive form of "to have".

3 years ago
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