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"Es un territorio sin descubrir."

Translation:It is an undiscovered territory.

5 years ago

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/troy.taylor

Is this how "un-" words are done is spanish? E.g. "Unarmed man" "El hombre sin armas"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

It depends: unarmed = desarmado, but "unreal" = "irreal", "uncountable" = "incontable"...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brbert02
brbert02
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so then is sin descubrir just an idiom

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Being honest, I am not sure. "Sin descubrir" can mean "undiscovered" but also "without discovering", there is also "por descubrir" (yet to discover?), so... @_@

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

I think sin descubrir means yet to be discovered or yet to discover, and not without discovering.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

Babella, I can only think of a sentence like this one: You could look for hours in this mess without discovering what you are looking for. I think without discovering needs a direct object.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

(It won't let me answer directly to your last message, sorry!).

I see, that is what I meant. "Sin descubrir" in Spanish can go both with or without a direct object: sin descubrir lo que pasó (without discovering what happened?) / un territorio sin descubrir (an undiscovered territory).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

"Yet to be discover/ed" would translate as "aún por descubrir", I think...

Does "without discovering" not make sense in English?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinCo

A very nice site for seeing many real examples is Linguee. They search through published text that has been professionally translated.

http://www.linguee.es/espanol-ingles/traduccion/sin+descubrir.html

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Would it be depending on the main word, i.e., for participle-adjectives, de(s); for 'real' adjectives, ir/in (maybe)? I'm trying to make sense of this difference (of desarmado, irreal, and incontable) so it'd be easier for me to remember. (Or maybe I'm stretching it too much) Thank you!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

As far as I know, there is no rule about this... I looked it up and found some webs in which they explain it, but it is mostly about the spelling. Here: http://eljuego.free.fr/Fichas_gramatica/FG_prefijosnegativos.htm You have the most common prefixes, but it is still mostly about spelling, so I guess there are no rules? If some other Spanish-speaker could help, that would be great.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Thanks for the reply, Babella. And thanks for the link, and for being around and helping us all here :).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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So, yet another idiom! "Sin descubrir" = undiscovered. Can we use the structrure "sin + infinitive verb" with any another verb? Estoy sin trabajar, Estoy sin cuidar, etc?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Russ_Eaton
Russ_Eaton
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Sin terminar = unfinished; i tried a few more verbs on Spanish Dict and it was hit and miss

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/john_wan

Anyone else think this is super weird in English with the article? "It's undiscovered territory" sounds so much better, but of course it's not literal enough for duolingo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ethjhig
ethjhig
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But it might be a particular undiscovered territory, in which case you want the article. No article changes the meaning in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaDhyan
MaDhyan
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I agree. I was marked wrong for omitting the 'an'. Feeling somewhat peeved!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JordanVetter

I put "region" instead of "territory" and it marked it wrong. Shouldn't matter, correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBraxton

JordanVetter: We had the words 'region' and 'territory' way, way back in maybe lesson 25 Places. They were listed as two different words. Region (accent over the o) - region, area, zone. Territorio - territory. Duo entered them as distinct from one another in it's computer and unless someone challenges the computer, it'll stay that way.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bhaynes1

Why can´t you translate it literally. " It is a territory without discovery". If that is not correct because it is an idiom, how would you make this statement in Spanish?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MamaLori5-30

Very frustrating that Duo throws idioms into the middle of other lessons and then refuses to give credit for a direct translation. No engine I put this sentence into came up with their solution. I reported it - we'll see what happens!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Menimue
Menimue
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If you place the curser over the word descubrir it gives the translation of,,'take ones hat off' I thought it meant discover??? Is this a duolingo error ??

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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This is because of the root meaning of descubrir, which is a compound word related in origin to the English word "discover".
Both word mean, when read literally, "to remove the cover". This is why both words are used to denote something that has always been there being revealed. In this lesson phrase it means that the territory exists now, but has not been found. In the same way that your head when covered by a hat is uncovered (dis-covered) when the hat is removed.

The difference between Spanish and English in this case is that English speakers are more metaphoric and rarely use discover to literally mean taking the lid off, while the Spanish have the option of being more literal.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jzw112
jzw112
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If the territory is undiscovered, how do you know that it exits? ;-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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That's very bold of you jzw112, applying logic! And it seems to be the only sensible comment here so far.
May I suggest a more appropriate (and logical) sentence would be "Es un territorio inexplorado" ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superguhsu

Does something need to exist to have a conversation about it? I like to talk about many things I have yet to discover.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Craig772913

Hovering over the word "territorio" tells me it could mean territory, country or region. But "It is an undiscovered country" is marked wrong. SpanishDict says that territorio just means territory.

Should I not be trusting the duolingo definitions now? What's the point of them if they're wrong?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superguhsu

It is a territory that has not been discovered It is a territory yet to be discovered

I know these statements are said differently en español, but could they be considered apt english translations? Why not?

10 months ago