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"Yo habré muerto."

Translation:I will have died.

5 years ago

99 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/drockalgzemoser
drockalgzemoser
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I posted this a couple sentences back, but here's another great opportunity for it! Future anterior—that be this tense—often is used to express conjecture about an event that "must have" occurred in the recent past.

The speaker here probably woke up in a strange setting, but everything seems calm—everything seems so perfect, beautiful, and oddly so...

"I must have died!"

"¡Yo habré muerto!"

Hope this helps.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/S0R0USH
S0R0USH
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The first time I had serious exposure to this compound tense was by watching the Back To the Future movies. haha

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

I don`t see where you are getting "I must have died!" That would be "Yo debo haber muerto." Am I wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonBastian
JonBastian
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You're right on the literal translation, but think of the English expression "I must have died and gone to heaven" as the idiomatic meaning. Without the last part of course.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

Still don`t see how the future tense "habré" can mean "must have". Also, why would "I must have died and gone to heaven" be an idiom?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/momisha

Its one if those phrases that has a not so literal usage too .Habre may hold the meaning must have here i guess it is of course also the fut per . a characteristic of the verb one must remember

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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This is a very special use of "must have" which actually is indicating that something is not right, but I don't know what it is for sure. "I suppose I must have died." but in the expression they omit "I suppose" as the expression is so well known that we know it is a supposition. You could use "I may have died." or "I might have died." for the same purpose. http://spanish.about.com/od/verbtenses/a/future_perfect.htm

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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This is really just the future perfect tense. I will have died. This is used to look at some future time at which point some significant thing will have already happened. It is not hypothesising what the present reality is. In one hundred years paper money will no longer be used. I will have died before then.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Galinuo
Galinuo
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Thank you. This helps

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roman_Huczok
Roman_Huczok
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But English already has (at least in some dialects) exactly the same usage as Spanish. You wake up in a strange but calm place and say 'hmm, I'll have died then'. It's not the best example, a better one is: you don't know where John is, but you suspect that you know, and someone asks you where he is, so you reply 'he'll (i.e. he will) have gone to the shops I imagine'

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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I agree. But I think that that is dying somewhat in English. But to a great extent what you are describing is more in line with the future perfect in Italian. The future perfect in Italian is often used to speculate about the past, where it is translated as must have. This is what the will have you are describing is used for. To my knowledge this is not a regular use of the Spanish future perfect, but there may be some dialectal usage of it in Spanish as well.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roman_Huczok
Roman_Huczok
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  1. It certainly isn't dying in my dialect

  2. It's speculation about the present, where John is now (gone to the shops) Juan habrá ido a las tiendas. More usual is Juan estará en las tiendas, John'll be in the shops, but we're doing the haber thing

  3. I studied in Madrid.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Well, I guess that's another dialectic variation, maybe in both languages. My English dialect distinguishes between speculation in the simple future, which is about the present or proximate future, and the future perfect which is either speculating about the future or the past equivalent to must have.

My current Spanish influence is Mexican Spanish as I live about 20 miles from the border, but my first influence was probably more Puerto Rican from the North East. I have heard the future tense used in Spanish to speculate about the present, but I don't believe I have ever heard it used to speculate either about the present or the past.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sojournerbliss

Or it's somebody's kvetching mother. "I will have died by the time you think to call me!"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jana80703

Or how about "I will have died by the time he is able to pay me back."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArvindPradhan

¡conoces tus madres judías bien!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OjosDelMundo

That is helpful. Have a lingot.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wade968771

You can give them away?!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Yep! Just click on 'Give Lingot' next to 'Reply'. Here, have one!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drockalgzemoser
drockalgzemoser
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Thanks a bunch!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

Indeed - good reminder!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_smiles_

Is there a way to determine if it is "I must have died" vs "I will have died" ? Or is the context the key determining factor?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jacobspaj

For 'I will have died' look for future tense of I have, habre followed by muerto. For 'I must have died' look for a tener que form or perhaps deber or something like that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanSchre1

Thank you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Galinuo
Galinuo
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"Must have died" makes sense, but this says "WILL have died"!! Honestly, for non english speaking person to learn spanish from english is hard enough, but "will have died" makes everything 80 level complicated . Can't wrap my head around will+have+participle. I wish anyone could explain this

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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The future perfect and the past perfect are not presented well on Duo because they are generally missing the contextual element which explains their use. Just as he HAD died assumes that the death took place prior to some other other event in the past, I will have died assumes that the death will happen between the present and some other event in the future. So normally you state them both together. I will have died by the time you make it to California. I will have died before they discover a cure for my disease, etc. But in the midst of a conversation you might well simply say I will have died. So when you see the future perfect on Duo, you just have to imagine any future circumstances that may be impacted by an event that is in the past from the point of view that event but in the future from today's point of view. In other words

A then B then C

A is present

B is the event in the future perfect

C is the event in the future that is the focus of the discussion.

So when you see the future perfect on Duo, if you make up a C event, it will make sense.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Matteo573535

You translated it completely wrong

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
martinlus
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.... By the time I get served in this restaurant perhaps?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jaimexplorer
jaimexplorer
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New nominee for DL's most morbid sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewMS221

Nah that definately goes to 'you can die'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EricCharter

Or "We are dead men." Or "I want him alive." Or "She does not have feelings." Or "You are not her real parents."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zeynepzlem
Zeynepzlem
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Or "They\he\she\it wont feel anything."

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marvincorea
marvincorea
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that escalated quickly

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/merrydew

Why are you learning all these languages?!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marvincorea
marvincorea
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I like to try to say at least hello in several languages. Right now I am focusing on improving my German.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ROSEMARYD

Oh my word, I just looked lol. I find it hard just learning Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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¿Y en qué piensas?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hud214
hud214
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"when you come back from your one month trip through space at near the speed of light it will be a hundred years in the future. I will have died." perfectly fine sentence. there's nothing wrong with that sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carcaveboy

Yeah, thats totally something you find yourself frequently saying.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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The purpose of Duo is not to become a phrase book of common phrases. It does include common phases, especially those where the Spanish or English is somewhat idiomatic. But mostly it provides a basic vocabulary and the grammar tools for you to be able to construct the myriad of sentences that some random circumstance may cause you to want to say within that vocabulary. But actually I have said this more than a few times when frustrated about some goal that seems to be taking a long time to complete. It ranges from the frustrated humor of I will have died before my kids learn to clean their own rooms, to a more rueful expression of a more significant goal. I will have died before there is a cure for cancer.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Not a phrase I plan on using often.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

You sound young.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yimantuwingyai
yimantuwingyai
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or like someone with a cryogenic chamber :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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How did you know, yimantuwingyai?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

"I will have died by the time I get through this lesson."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eeveeluver1009

haha

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

Well, I'm still alive and suffering slowly lol!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshWhitaker

sin tu amor. No me dejar.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bridelfe
bridelfe
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*no me dejes :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wfufidio

How morbid!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OneVerce

Would have died?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drockalgzemoser
drockalgzemoser
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habría muerto

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ken.goodwi

I will have died just sounds awful to me. Should that not be I would have died?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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"Will have+past participle" is used when comparing two future events of which this one will have happened in the future before the other one in the future. "Would have+past participle" is the Conditional perfect tense "If you had left me alone, I would have died." is for something that would have happened in the past if a condition were different. I suppose we just don't like to predict the future, especially predicting that someone will die before something else will happen.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ep_nl
ep_nl
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DL considers "I'll be dead" as wrong. Why?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

That would be "Yo estaré muerto."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ep_nl
ep_nl
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Gracias!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

De nada

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BezJones
BezJones
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Why not mortado?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hud214
hud214
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muerto is the past particle of morir.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tracey1960

I would have died is acceptable in English

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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The sentence itself is certainly acceptable, but it doesn't reflect the tense in this sentence. 'Would have....' is 'habria....

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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The preferred answer shown above is the correct answer. I will have died. If Duo suggested I would have died as the correct answer, report it. You are correct in that this is the future perfect and would have is the conditional perfect

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/supersalve

I will have died? This sentence seems like a grammatical error.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamiejam125

Would "I would have died" make more sense in English? Because I will have died does not make sense to me and I'm a native speaker.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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June 9, 2016 - While I agree that "I would have died" is a sentence one is more likely to hear, the Spanish sentence is definitely in future perfect.

"I would have died" is conditional perfect in English. (perfect in regards to verbs means that the action is completed.)

Future perfect in English: http://www.englishtenses.com/tenses/future_perfect

In case you hadn't found it yet, here is my favorite Spanish verb conjugator: http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/gustar

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hud214
hud214
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"I will have died." is something you could hear I think. Rather literary. The same thing as "(By then) I'll be dead." Maybe "I will have died." is more fatalistic and/or affected. American here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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I can't speak to British usage, but as an American I find no difference between. I will be dead before you repay me and I will have died before you repay me. But Duo's lack of context is very difficult when looking at past perfect and future perfect sentences. Duo never shows the past or future actions which is the central point (in my suggestion it would be you repay me) When these sentences appear strange, I suggest you add in something that happens after the perfect element.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jakedrae

What the hell is this??????? We don't say this in English!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gaviota337744
Gaviota337744
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It's perfectly acceptable English. E.g. "In the year 3000, there will be cheap space travel, but I will have died by then."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/btorgrimson

How can i get the accents on my notebook?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cathfie
cathfie
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Por entonces...?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deo.
Deo.
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Even my English teacher would be confused hearing this...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Really? Your English teacher has never known the future perfect?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElCoronelEsponja

Nice upbeat way to start the module.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jasmine234996

I think it should have i would have died

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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April 19, 2017 - While I agree that "I would have died" is a sentence one is more likely to hear, the Spanish sentence is definitely in future perfect.

"I would have died" is conditional perfect in English. (perfect in regards to verbs means that the action is completed.)

Future perfect in English: http://www.englishtenses.com/tenses/future_perfect

In case you hadn't found it yet, here is my favorite Spanish verb conjugator: http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/gustar

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The3rdBeast

Well there's a happy thought.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pokerguy365

I will have died by the time it's taken you to have read this

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TeresaGrocki

Yo habre muerto. I will have died. HOW IS THIS WRONG??? It matched

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Sometimes those accents are really important, and they're easy to miss. Yo habré muerto = I will have died. Yo habre muerto (no accent) = I would have died. .

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WolfieRocks

Im confused, why I will have died? That makes no sense? I would gladly give a Lingot if you explain

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hud214
hud214
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I will explain, but no lingot will do me any good. Alas, by the time you read this I will have died. It's too late for me. Save yourself!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hud214
hud214
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do i get my lingot or what?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Can one bequeath lingots?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PannasOwen
PannasOwen
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I will have died by the time i am immortal

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vngdhuyen
vngdhuyen
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could it be "I will have been dead"?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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No. That would be passive voice. This is active voice. I will have died [long before there is peace in the middle east, for example]. Future perfect talks about something that will have happened before something else happens in the future.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vngdhuyen
vngdhuyen
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I see. then how would you translate "I will have been dead", would it be "habré estado muerto"?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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No. The Spanish formal passive voice uses ser and the past participle., so it would be habré sido muerto. The se passive is more common, but morir already has a strange reflexive form. After much asking, I was finally told that morirse is used for recent or particularly close deaths as in family members. So I don't know if that unusual reflexive meaning would affect the se passive construction. Me habré muerto. It doesn't seem right to me.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/callum870152

Way to think positive!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Solo es realista. Y hay muchas cosas que pueden o ocurrirán algún día que estoy muy feliz de pensar que voy a haber muerto antes de que sucedan

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KelseySTC

??

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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I will have died before the Padres win the World Series (not that I care). I will have died by the time there is peace in the Middle East. In other words the future perfect talks about something that is as yet in the future but will have already happened before whatever future event we are discussing. Since Duo's sentences don't usually contain the main thing we are talking about, they are confusing, but the concept is present in the tense.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xn7Y4zw5iIs

Cuando tú te hayas ido

me envolverán las sombras.

Cuando tú te hayas ido,

con mi dolor a solas,

evocaré este idilio

y las azules horas.

Cuando tú te hayas ido

me envolverán las sombras.

Y en la penumbra vaga

de mi pequeña alcoba,

donde una tibia tarde

me acariciabas toda,

te buscarán mis brazos,

te buscará mi boca

y aspiraré en el aire

aquel olor a rosas.

Cuando tú te hayas ido

me envolverán las sombras.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Very nice. Wow present perfect subjective. I don't think the analytlcal part of my brain has worked on that one much. I think of present perfect as a past tense, but the present subjunctive is often speculating about the future and the Spanish future Subjunctive is archaic so it sort of makes sense to me. But my first reaction was confusion as to why you were posting this here. Of course à subjunctive clause starting with Cuando, although perfectly reasonable in Spanish, seems crazy in English, and my casual translation came nowhere near the English future perfect. Of course really eloquent transaction is not my strong suit. Is this the usual use of the present perfect subjective, or just one of the uses?

I have been wanting to ask you where you are from. You mentioned South America in one of your recent posts and the singer is Venezuelan. Are you also? You will amused to know that it took me a minute to realize that Soledad Bravo was a person's name. It sounds so profound, but I kept wanting to correct it to Soledad Brava.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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In this song the author use the Pretérito perfecto de subjuntivo + futuro simple in order to complain about what it is going to happen when the beloved person has died. There is also the use of the pretérito imperfecto de indicativo (me acariciabas toda) to remember the good moments she is going to miss in the future. Very emotional and moving song. Songs can be a good resource to learn languages as well. This use of tenses is not very common in Spanish. We use the presente de subjuntivo instead: "Cuando te vayas, cerraré la puerta". It is a poetic use in the song, with a very nice effect.

In Spanish it is very common to use el presente de subjuntivo followed by futuro simple or imperative: "Cuando apruebes el curso, nos iremos de vacaciones" or "Cuando vayas a la tienda, cómprame un litro de leche". I posted this song because is what DL's sentence reminded me.

Regards from Spain.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clari64
Clari64Plus
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Well this is a cheery sentence! Haha

1 month ago