https://www.duolingo.com/glauciasilva92

Whose cat is this? or Whose is this cat?

Which one is correct?

February 3, 2015

23 Comentários


https://www.duolingo.com/.R.B.

The first one without a doubt !

Whose is this cat?... that sounds like a direct translation from Portuguese, don't you think? Like, if you were about to translate that, like "De quem" ! I don't remember ever seeing anywhere that the second sentence is wrong, but... really, it doesn't sound that common. Definitely, to be on the safe side I would say, go for the first one!

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/glauciasilva92

Thank you ! Are you american?

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/.R.B.

I'm Brazilian!! Looks like you have started a war around here, the jury is still out on whether "Whose is this cat?" should be acceptable or not ! :D

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Sir-Bender

He's Brazilian! But yeah, he knows English like nobody's business! https://www.duolingo.com/comment/6680078

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/.R.B.

You flatter me! my English is far from perfect

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/jhill11

The first one is by far the better option. You should always use the first one rather than the second one when asking questions like this. However, if someone asked me "Whose is this cat?" I would still fully understand, it just would sound a bit off.

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence

Ouch... from a Brit, hearing from someone else that a common way we speak sounds 'off' is quite... disheartening.

http://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammar/pronouns/questions

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/.R.B.

lol we were bound to find someone !!! But, who knows, maybe it's an influence on British English from Spanish or Portuguese! It's not impossible !

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence

I'm not saying it is impossible, I know our language is very freely influenced by other languages, because we are at heart very casual about it. Despite some loud purists among us, as a people we generally see grammar as a futile attempt to explain a language, rather than a prescription to follow :)

But I think if it was a real influence from Spanish or Portuguese, the translation would probably be more like 'Of whom is this cat?'. Although I find myself repeating the statement I originally responded to, in that it makes perfect sense to me, it just sounds a bit.. off..

So I see the irony, hehe :)

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/jhill11

Disheartening how? In my dialect of English, no one would ever ask the question the second way. Not saying it's wrong, but to me it sounds unnatural.

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence

It's disheartening, because I thought I was English, but I would instinctively say "Whose is this cat?" or "Whose is this ball" or "Whose is this cup" or "Whose is this shirt?", with the full intention being to leave the emphasis on the the final word, but in light of recent events I don't even know if I have been doing it wrong these last 30 years...

:(

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/G0108

You're not wrong at all. I'm American and I could casually switch between the first and second without a problem. To me it sounds like a natural phrase in English.

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence

So it would seem that with respect to the original poster, Glauciasilva, not every question has a straight answer.

Apparently then, both are correct, so we all win, no rules to follow :)

And a word to the wise, we would probably prefer it to stay that way...

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/.R.B.

Well, you live and learn! The funny thing is, if you look up "Whose is this cat?" on the internet the results will be "Whose cat is this/that?" Maybe it's because that would be the most common way to ask. But, like Chilvence said, when you say, "whose is this coat", the emphasis is on the final word.

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence

In reply to Tom-Riddle, Well I am certainly with you , in fact I have to smile because I often just use google myself to check my sentences if I am not confident, its quite a relief to be able to type a sentence in quotes and see if it exists in the wild :)

What I think I would like to share with everyone learning English, is that is does not exist in a bubble of grammatical perfectness; we ourselves are usually very flexible because we have so many dialects among ourselves that it barely makes sense to define any as the 'correct' one. Even in the UK, we, the general population, barely have the slightest respect for the Queen's English, we just talk however we like, and call it English after the fact.

So I would hate to imagine that anyone torments themselves with getting the minute details of speaking English correctly, over questions like the original post, because we are far more willing to bend our ears to someone trying to make themselves heard than we are to hold them to our own standards of English - We know when we have the home advantage, it is very unsportsmanlike to revel in it.

I know I have gone wildly off topic, but I am just going with the vibe I'm feeling...

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/.R.B.

Btw jhll11, where are you from ?

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/glauciasilva92

I canot follow you guys !

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/.R.B.

Chegamos a conclusão que ambas as formas "Whose is this cat?" e "Whose cat is this" são aceitáveis !!

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/jhill11

US

February 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr

Both are grammatically correct.

Whose cat is this? whose= possessive determiner

Whose is this cat? whose = pronoun

As a native speaker, I prefer Whose cat is this? The second sentence sounds awkward, especially based on how it sounds - pronunciation wise...too many "s's" in a row.

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller

Reminds me of Corona singing "zeezeezee rhythm of the night" (this is the).

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/AmandhaSun

kkk hi flowless

February 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Official-EU

As a native English speaker, it's whose cat is this.

October 22, 2017

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