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https://www.duolingo.com/mazdee

Explain why doing the translations can help me

I am asked to "translate this" document each time I complete a lesson. These have already been translated by other users, so I'm supposed to agree or disagree with the translation. I just don't get it! I would love to try to translate something, but when I look at these, I seldom find anything about the translations to question. How is this supposed to help me?

3 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/writchie4
writchie4
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Try scrolling down in the article to find sentences that have not yet been translated. Sentences in black are already translated/reviewed, sentences in gray have been translated but still require checking, and sentences in blue have not yet been translated.

If the article you were recommended has already been fully translated, you can always look in the Immersion section and choose an article for yourself. Take a look at this guide to get a handle on the interface if you need help, it can be a little intimidating for new users.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence
chilvence
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I think you have to look at it out of the context of the site itself. Whether or not the translation has already been done, if you read the original article without looking at the translation, and are able to grasp some of its meaning, then that is a very good excercise, because learning words in context buries them very deep in your memory. Sometimes you can even help a bad translation, when you realise your grasp of the article is better than the original translator (which can easily happen, we all have different knowledge, and besides there are lots of jerks that just use google translate)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mazdee

Thanks for that good advice. I live in México and try to look at the local paper (online) each day. I can't translate word for word, but I get the gist of most of the stories and if it's something important to me, I ask Sr Google to help. Now that I know I can find new articles on the "Immersion" page, I'll probably spend more time there.

An idea for those who don't live in a Spanish speaking country: Every major Spanish language newspaper in the world has a website. Pick a country of interest, find out which are the major newspapers and add one to your daily practice. You can learn a lot about that country/city while honing Spanish skills. (Warning: Journalists seem to have their own language, and it might be difficult for a beginner to translate some of it.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Taloua
Taloua
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Personally, I stopped doing it. I just concentrate on my trees

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jhorra
jhorra
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You can also just click on the immersion tab and find tons that aren't translated or only partially translated.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luscinda
Luscinda
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Stay away from any translation document to which the site is sending you - it will be full of new users squabbling. Pick something that interests you from the Immersion tab or import a document that you want to translate.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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  • Why translating documents can help you learn your target language?
  • How is it supposed to help you?

Here's my quick answer. They don't help you efficiently and I'm not sure it is going to be helpful for beginners. The web is full of professionally translated documents, books (short stories, children books), articles, speeches, songs, and movie scripts. The web is also full of unprofessional, amateurish translations. I understand why DuoLingo wants their users to translate documents, but they don't do a great job of explaining why "Immersion" works. You're getting peer feedback but apparently it is not sufficient for many users. Your translation can easily be down-voted with little to no explanation. Unfortunately the Immersion section like many online forums are not policed and monitored. It may be helpful to work with a partner.

Don't get me wrong, I'm sure if you're using the Immersion daily then you will surely learn the language because your using your noodles to figure out the text. Personally I prefer to read books, articles, listen to interviews, etc with professional translations daily. I don't want to become a translator, I want to learn and speak the language. I don't think the Immersion section will help me reach that goal.

Here's a perfect example of a great way to immerse yourself in your target L2. Study this interview. Benny (Fluent in 3 months) interviewed Luis Von Ahn (Chief OverLord-Mastermind of DuoLingo). You're getting Spanish audio + a Spanish transcription and an English transcription. Click the link below and immerse yourself . . . disfruta la entrevista!

<h1>Interview with DuoLingo (and Captcha) creator Luis Von Ahn, in Spanish con ingles-español subtitulos</h1>
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elgatobandido
Elgatobandido
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I've already picked up some new words translating and it makes reading Spanish (or whatever language you are translating) more familiar the more you translate.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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You will definitely pick up new words doing Immersion but you will pick up new words enjoying a movie or reading a children's picture book. Maybe even a YA novel.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elgatobandido
Elgatobandido
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I'm watching Spanish news and have seen a couple of TV shows.
I find that I pick up more watching news than TV shows, and there were a couple of instances recently when I understood a great deal of what they were saying (especially when they were not talking too fast).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mazdee

Wow, that's interesting! And you say the interviewer became fluent in 3 months? I had to turn on the subtitles because I was missing too much. Thanks, and to all the others who have answered my questions about the translation exercises.

3 years ago