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  5. "Hvor er fjenden?"

"Hvor er fjenden?"

Translation:Where is the enemy?

February 3, 2015

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac_Luna_

What parents ask when they're attempting to play your game.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnhelg

I wonder why 'enemy' is among the first set of words in 'people' part. Are you really so hateful, Danish people? I doubt it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

The word root is probably the same but the meaning is different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/prumpsyplo

A great conversation starter in local restaurants


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Lauren13_

right behind you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Simon802251

'Where are the enemy?' is perfectly correct English and should be accepted as a correct answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidSchmi952575

Sure? Maybe more enemys.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/water_color

No personal agreement of "to be"? Strange


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

English, especially the British variant, I think, has a preference for so-called collective nouns. If you're using a singular noun that represents a group of people, that noun may use plural grammar:

  • The audience watch in suspense.
  • The staff were busy.
  • The police are all around.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidDonal4

Where are the enemy should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angus895979

Where are the enemy should be correct should it not? We say where are the people as plural is implied


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

If your enemy consists of multiple people, that's a good translation as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CongChen2

tag dig herfra, fjend!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Armonian

Take yourself away from here, enemy?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/speedfreak14

Is the "d" pronounced or not? Unfortunately I can't hear it clear enough


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb
Mod
  • 54

The "d" in "fjende" is silent. Ds following certain letters tend to be (but aren't always) silent. Some examples of these letter combinations with a silent D are "nd", "ld" and "rd"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andy585

Oh boy, I am getting flashbacks from icelandic. Is there a complete pronounciation guide?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cibula99

Enemy is at the gates


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SantiAnnd

Interesting, in Old English an enemy was also called "fiend"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

"Fiend" is still used in modern English, but usually for a different kind of opponent, an otherwoldly being. I also like the phrase "fiendish smile".

The English "fiend" is cognate with Danish "fjend" and German "Feind".

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