"Você tem fome?"

Translation:Are you hungry?

August 8, 2013

54 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lahure

'Ter' is a strange little word, yet indeed a keyword. It does not only mean 'to have'. It can also mean 'to be', 'to hold' and 'there is / there are'. Here are some examples:

  1. Você tem uma caneta? Do you have a pen? Have you got a pen?

  2. Ela tem sete anos. She is seven. She is seven years old.

  3. A mesa tem um metro de comprimento. The table is one metre (meter) long. The table is one metre (meter) in length.

  4. Eu tenho fome (estou com fome). I'm hungry.

  5. A caixa tem um quilo de chocolates. The box holds (contains) one kilo of chocolates.

  6. Tem água quente? Is there hot water?

  7. Tem aquecimento central e ar condicionado. There's central heating and air conditioning.

  8. O que é que você tem? What's the matter with you?

October 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Neia.Abreu

very good Lahure ! Lol.. Ter é parecido com o uso de "to get", muitos significados, e muito confuso para os estrangeiros.

July 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lahure

Para Neia.Abreu. Você é muito gentil! Boa sorte com seus estudos no futuro.

July 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jenretten

Similar to avoir in french or maybe haber in spanish?

July 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kbalara

With exception of "ter=there be" everything about ter is the same for Spanish tener.

For the use meaning there be we have in Spanish another verb: haber.

September 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lagata8484

This didn't sound like a question. They never sound like questions to me.

August 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/r_i_l_e_y

Yeh I'm not sure the software used to produce the voice is capable yet of producing the intonation needed for changing the sentence from a statement to a question.

August 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JewishPolyglot

really? I thought they at least recorded individual words

November 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rafareisbr

Really, The sound was like affirmative sentences. Sorry the bad english =)

July 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John_Difeo

I've heard a common Portuguese phrase is "Você está com fome." Is this more common than "Você tem fome?"

May 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davu

The short answer is yes and the longer answer is here: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/8208601

May 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joshowosho

I realize that this means "are you hungry?" But, when I time the actual translation (do you have hunger), it marks me wrong.

January 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davu

Although Duolingo often accepts literal translations, this one is just too strange. Even if it is a well formed English question, you could never ask "Do you have hunger?" without raising a few eyebrows.

January 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joshowosho

I agree, I lived in Brazil for awhile, and tourists often said it in many different ways. When using this program though, I wish that it would say "that is the correct literal translation, but in Portuguese..." And not make you lose a heart over it :)

January 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dessamator

It is weird but grammatically correct, or weird and incorrect?

I ask because it often seems that a sentence people are not used to hearing or reading seems strange, yet it is completely accurate. For instance there are many verses in religious texts that are accurate, but anybody saying them in broad daylight may sound completely strange.

To me, although it is odd, and I would probably never use it, the sentence looks correct.

January 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davu

I tried to sum that up by saying it would raise eyebrows. :-) You do hear it in religious rhetoric - "Do you have hunger and thirst for the Lord?". It's fine in "Do you have hunger pangs?".

This is not the place to debate the issue, but many people here are not native speakers of English, and are probably still learning English while trying to learn Portuguese. By accepting archaic or overly literal English translations, Duolingo would be doing those people a disservice, although I understand that it is not easy to get it right all the time.

January 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's because the word "hunger" in English is very strong, stronger than to be "hungry".)

Compare: Have you hunger (and thirst) of justice? Vs Are you hungry with justice?

Hunger: craving for, the aspiration for justice is so strong that the soul what is deprived is starving and dries up)

April 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nihongoneko14

In Spanish it also means the same "Tienes hambre"? Do you have hunger?

December 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whitebox

I guess estar is not a verb that can be used in this case?

August 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/r_i_l_e_y

I think I asked this (or a similar) question before. If memory serves me right "você está com fome" is grammatically correct, but sounds strange to a native speaker (probably in the same way that if someone said "I am with hunger", instead of "I am hungry", it would sound strange).

But "Você está fome" is definitely wrong because this would translate to "You are hunger"

August 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wes_car

Hey Rilley... I know what you meant, and also I'd like to strengthen your comment, in portuguese is more common to say "tá com fome? Vamos comer uns biscoitos?" - Informal and not gramatically correct, but we say that a lot.
translation would be like that (I think) - Hungry? Let's eat some cookies?

Você está com fome? is much more used than voce tem fome?. It makes more sense for us.

September 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whitebox

Thanks dude. How long did it take for you to get to level 20? I'm trying to swallow all of portuguese as fast as I can.

August 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/r_i_l_e_y

Probably 4 months. I always made sure all skills in my tree were full strength before moving forward so I could have finished it a lot sooner and with a lot less points.

August 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rafareisbr

Hi, I am brazilian, I am a beginner speaker, We understand " Você está com fome?" = Are you hungry? it is the same thing . Thanks

July 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zwegemer

i know i seem ridiculous, but i put "you have hunger" instead. why (other than seeming unnatural) is this wrong?

April 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's correct, but unnatural, and not the idiomatic way.
There are 2 ways to say it. With the verb "to be", describing the condition of someone who didn't eat, and with the verb "to have" describing a kind of "quality" that you can possess, the "hunger".

In English: "I'm hungry", and "I have hunger", but the natural way choosen by the English language is the condition, with the verb to be, in Portuguese, French, etc.. they prefered the "quality" way, with the verb "to have", Tener fame, Avoir faim, etc... but the condition way also exist Estar faminto, Être affamé, etc...
The difference between "tener fame", "avoir faim" and "estar faminto", "être affamé", is that when you use the second one, it's a very strong hunger, close of starving. I don't know if in English, when you say "I'm hungry" and "I have hunger" is the same intensity, I gusse "to have hunger" can be stronger than "to be hungry".

April 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/derek.todd

This is confusing me.

Você tem fome? literally translated to English is You have hunger? Because i wrote it as I saw it (you have hunger?) I got it wrong. I knew it didn't sound correct. I typed the answer (Are you hungry) into a translator and the translation came out as Está com fome not Você tem fome? Where does the "are" come from?

August 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gleise

why ñ is you are or are you"?????

August 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davu

I think you may be puzzled by the change of word order. When you write "Você tem fome" you are making a statement and one way (not the most literal way) of writing that statement in English is "You are hungry". When you write "Voce tem fome?" you are asking a question and in English we have to change the word order to "Are you hungry?". That question mark makes all the difference, without it "You are", with it, "Are you".

September 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/r_i_l_e_y

ñ? Do you mean "tem"?

Você = you

tem = have

fome = hunger

Você tem fome? = You have hunger? = Are you hungry?

August 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jazuchan396

Could this also be 'You are hungry." as a statement, if you remove the question mark?

September 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/djeidot

Yes.

October 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1950Dircene

I'm confuse because "hunger"mean need of food,samething the hungry that is an adjective but in porteguese should be:voce esta faminto?

November 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chogas

They don't use that mode of expression when they are hungry.

December 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davu

Isn't it just a matter of degree? You would ask if someone is hungry with "Você tem fome?" or "Você está com fome?", but if you suspect they are famished you would ask "Você está faminto/a?".

December 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chogas

You mean that expression is contingent on the degree of hunger whose is asked??

December 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davu

That's quite a technical way of putting it, but yes I suppose I am. Really all I meant was the expression with "faminto/a" is used sometimes. In fact, the word is an adjective which can mean simply "hungry" but, perhaps because it looks similar to the English word "famished", I have the impression it implies "very hungry".

December 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chogas

Oh I see what you're saying. But the words are not equivalent to each other though one has a resemblance to the other. and furthermore, if the words are same perfectly each other, they don't have same meaning.

December 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/06browningl

As I understand it (my boyfriend is a native speaker, and this is how he explained it) fome is the feeling of hunger. Literally translated, it would say "are you with the feeling of hunger?", which we don't use in english, but it makes sense :)

August 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/powkagese

How can you tell if it is a question?

March 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

If it's not written, you can't, normally with the intonation, but DL is not good at that.

April 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Romulo.Np

In Portugues the answer correct would be:

''Você tem fome?'' = '' Do you have hungry ?''

October 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davu

The literal English version is better written as "Do you have hunger?" but it's not something you'll often hear and "Are you hungry?" is the most natural way to ask that question.

October 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielMai12

Só me deran a alternativa de escrever "have, is, own" coloquei "have" e me corrigiram com "feel" e nem tinha essa opção.

É injusto

August 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

Você está com fome? =

• Do you feel hungry?
• Are you hungry?

August 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucas32F55

Tem "got/have"

October 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clovis10alberto

Se fôssemos traduzir ao pé da letra => "Are you hungry? (Você está faminto?)" / "Do you have hunger? (Você tem fome? ou Você está com fome?). Se não for isso, alguém me corrija por favor.

January 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

"Do you have hunger?" soa muito estanho em inglês.

January 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Durlydurl

I believe my answer: "You hungry?" should be correct, as it is common in other languages, but it is marked as wrong. Any insight as to why? Or is it just something DuoLingo missed as a possible answer?

October 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davu

I'm British and although "You hungry?" is something you'll hear quite often in the UK, it is really just a lazy way to ask "Are you hungry?". Colloquialisms like this are usually rejected.

October 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Durlydurl

Thanks. Although lazy works, I can see how it is a bad habit to condone when learning a language.

October 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/felipe.mah

Do yoy have hungry is better

May 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jandorp

For people who don't speak perfect English, this course can be confusing because it assumes that your first language IS English. To express the MEANING (not the single words) of "Você tem fome?", an English speaker will say "Are you hungry?", and that's why it is given as the correct translation. So if you're learning Portuguese but your English is only so-so, you are learning two languages at the same time! And "Do you have hungry" is nonsense, sorry — it does not exist in English.

September 12, 2014
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