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"Hun tager en universitetsuddannelse."

Translation:She takes a university education.

3 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rkvance5
rkvance5
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Could this be "She's getting..."? I'm still not sure what it means to take an education.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joelmagoun
joelmagoun
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This is just the common way this is said in Danish, and the suggested answer is just translated literally.. if you were just speaking in English you would likely choose different words to describe someone going to university.

"she is getting" would be an acceptable substitution.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hr1982
hr1982
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It should be "getting," I think. At least in the U.S., we take classes, but get educations.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Birdexplorers
BirdexplorersPlus
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Duo accepts "She is getting a university education."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/londoncallling

It accepts university degree, which works better with 'takes'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ivancelic
ivancelic
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She takes a(n) university education?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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I'm not sure what you're asking about. Are you unsure whether to use "a" or "an" for the article?

Whether you use "a" or "an" depends on the pronounciation of the next word, specifically if that word has a vowel for its initial sound or a consonant. So you say

  • an undertaking; an urban area, because these words begin with vowelly sounds ([ʌ] and [ɜ:], respectively, which would be close to a and ø in Danish)
    but
  • a universe; a union, because those are pronounced with a [j] in the beginning.

Conversely you have

  • a house; a huge dog, because these are pronounced with consonants ([h] and [ç])
    but
  • an hour; an honour, because the "h" is silent here.

I think "u" and "h" are the only letters in English where this kind of thing happens, so it's not too difficult to apply. Still annoying enough, though. :´)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roxanneba
roxanneba
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This is misleading. We would never say in the UK that you "take" an education, or a degree for that matter.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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I wrote "she's studying at a university." This is one of the worst duo translations I've seen!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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It has basically the same meaning, but I would suggest to stay as close as possible to a literal translation. "She is studying at a university" would be better captured as "Hun læser på et universitet."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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But no one (in the USA at least) would say "She takes a university education." -- "She's getting a university education", maybe. I've done some professional translations - also from Danish. It's a difficult task, because things are expressed differently in different countries - and even organized differently. In Denmark you get an "uddannelse" in English or Medicine, or whatever. In England, I think, you "read Economics" or whatever. In the USA you go to college or a university and you get your education there, and major in something (as an undergraduate), but I said I was "studying Germanic linguistics" when I went to graduate school.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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I know that predicament about fixed phrases (and the different use of prepositions among languages). I just tried to explain a little. :)
No one would seriously say it like that in English, I agree, but I'm a proponent of keeping the translations rather literal. It teaches you better how the people from other languages are thinking. After all, you're here to learn Danish, not English. :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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In a way I agree with you, because my granddaughter is about to start 'reading' at Oxford, and I live on the USA and I and my daughter studied in Danmark. There's no way to make a decent translation. But I got it wrong here, and since i'm fluent in Danish, I don't like that!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/potatoemouse

Just as an aside, I have only ever heard it referred to as ‘reading’ a subject at Oxford and Cambridge. You would be more likely to hear a British person say they are taking (or doing) a degree in Maths or whatever. I would say for this sentence, she is getting a university education.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElPela86
ElPela86
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She takes AN university education

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilmolleggi
ilmolleggi
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nope it's pronounced "yooneeversuhty" so it takes "a" like "year" or "yacht".

2 years ago