https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vathn

Irish words

Hello everyone :) Would it be useful to learn Irish words before starting the Duolingo tree as a whole? I was struggling with the basics because of the different sentence structure + having to learn the words at the same time. When I learned some basic Irish words and returned to the basics on Duolingo it was much easier for me because I only had to focus on the grammar, and did not have to learn words at the same time. But some people told me that it's better to learn words and grammar at the same time and now I'm wondering what works best with learning a language. It's really discouraging to not being to complete things on Duolingo here because it's a bit much to start and I really don't want to quit on Irish.

February 3, 2015

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ProinsiasOFoghlu

I am doing both memise and duo lingo. About 2 years ago I also tried Buntús Cainte, but gave up on it because I had no one to practice with, I'm enjoying this much better I also had the advantage of some buried in brain school irish.

Tomorrow night I'm going to an irish speaking circle, my vocabulary is small but I'll give it a try.

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeaininMC

Maith thú, a Phroinsias! Go n-éirí an t-ádh leat leis an gciorcal comhrá.

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ProinsiasOFoghlu

Chuaig mé go dtí an gciorcal comhrá aréir. Is maith liom é ach tá sé go deachair.

I knew what people were talking about but could not understand all the words. I will keep this us as its the only way to improve orally.

February 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jillianimal

I did a few irish memrise courses before it came out on duo lingo & I definitely think it helped. Someone made a memrise course on duolingo's Irish so that's probably the best place to start as you won't have to worry about learning completely different/wrong vocabulary. .

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GerdW.

I don't know if one can learn Irish with Duolingo alone. I doubt it, especially not the grammar. I'd recommend getting a traditional textbook. Either "Learning Irish" by Mícheál O'Siadhail or "Teach Yourself Irish", preferably the old edition by Myles Dillon but the new one is good too. There is also a very basic book called "Buntús Cainte" which is quite nice.

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vathn

Thanks!

Grammar has always been an issue for me, in every language I've come across. I've noticed that textbooks don't work for me, I can't "just" learn a language from a book. I really need to use it almost everyday to master it somewhat.

English is not my first language. I speak it well enough to understand things like Duolingo and Memrise, but textbooks are really hard for me to understand. And I have no idea if there are Irish textbooks in Dutch.

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rewjeo
  • 1551

Are you just learning German for the first time, or do you have a pretty good grasp of it? For what it's worth, Irish seems to be unusually popular with Germans, and I think I've heard of at least one German textbook for Irish. There's also the possibility that having something like Buntus would help. It's in English, but it doesn't seem to intimidating from what I've done, and there's a free PDF of an old version available.

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vathn

I'll see if I can try some of these books. Thank you.

February 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GerdW.

Your English seems fine to me and if you can work with Duolingo I think you'll be fine with the new edition of Teach Yourself. There is a preview for first chapter at Amazon if you wanna check it.

February 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KrystleLee1

Thank you for the suggestion! I have just bought the book on Amazon. I have been using an app to teach myself and so far it has gone well, but it doesn't focus enough on grammar..... I'm using every single tool I can because I believe you're right in saying that using duolingo alone will not teach you to become fluent..... Well not with Irish any way, I have no idea what other language courses are like as of yet. Would somebody who knows, mind telling me what Buntus Cainte is?

February 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GerdW.

Buntús Cainte is a very popular and simple Irish course. It's quite old but still good. The only problem is that is offers no grammar and no linguistic explanation but it is a great ressource for practising simple sentences.

February 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KrystleLee1

Thank you :)

February 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rewjeo
  • 1551

I'm also doing Memrise with Duolingo. I use Duolingo as the place where grammar and vocab are introduced, and where I practice them together in sentences, but I use other resources (sometimes just the comments of certain knowledgeable folks here - I always, always check discussions, even if I don't have a question, because who knows what gems could be in there?) to further/reinforce my knowledge of grammar and my vocabulary.

Have you looked up things like how the orthography/basic grammar/etc. work? I did, and I found it helpful because it meant I wasn't quite so lost, which I think is your problem - Irish is just so different from English.

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EavanM

I don't see harm in learning very basic nouns and adjectives. The problem would arise if you're trying to learn verbs, prepositions, and other parts of speech that work very differently in Irish than Dutch or English.

February 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fingolfin1346

Maybe have a go learning vocab and then using Duolingo to test it. I'd say try Memrise and Anki and see if you find them helpful. Everyone learns languages differently so it's a case of finding what works for you.

If you're looking for some grammar pointers to go along with learning vocabulary, Nualeargais has some good (free) resources: http://www.nualeargais.ie/

Good luck and well done for giving Irish a go. The more people learning it the better, dar liomsa.

February 4, 2015

[deactivated user]

    My six year old's school conference was yesterday and his teacher asked me if Irish is being spoken in the home at all (we live in Ireland). I told her that we don't (my Irish husband hates the language, so is hard-pressed to speak what he remembers of it), but that I'm trying to learn it so that I can help my son and speak it with him.

    She was very encouraging to hear this and suggested that I buy "Gaeilge Gan Stró - Level 1", to use alongside the Duolingo and Memrise Duolingo courses that I'm using.

    I found it for sale on amazon.co.uk, but am going to see if I can source it somewhere here for a bit less (if anyone here in IRL knows where I can buy it locally, I'd be grateful to hear from you!)

    The book includes 4 CDs with native speakers, so that the student can develop an ear for what spoken, conversational Irish sounds like. I don't know much more about it beyond that, but my son's teacher highly recommended it.

    February 5, 2015
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