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"De wolken voorspellen onweer."

Translation:The clouds foreshadow a thunderstorm.

3 years ago

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Tina_in_Bristol
Tina_in_Bristol
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Must it be translated as a thunderstorm, or could you just say "a storm"? (I tried this, but was marked wrong.) In English, it is quite common to look at thunderclouds and say: "There's going to be a storm", without having to say "thunderstorm" in full. Equally, you can say: "It looks like thunder", without having to use the word "storm". Particularly in Summer, a storm would normally be taken to mean a thunderstorm. In Winter, a storm could mean gales.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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It's a bit different in Dutch, onweer involves thunder and lightning, storm involves heavy wind, not used for a thunderstorm normally, bui or regenbui is shower and onweersbui is a relatively short onweer.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcuslangford

You can say "thundershower" although you will hardly ever hear it outside a weather forecast.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Birdexplorers
BirdexplorersPlus
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Agree. The terms "thundershowers" "lightning storms" "electrical storms" are commonly used variants in meteorological circles, and I have heard all of these variants fairly often in the vernacular.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcuslangford

thank goodness i thought i was going mad.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tina_in_Bristol
Tina_in_Bristol
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I've never heard that, even in a weather forecast. "Thundery showers", yes. If the forecast talked about "thundershowers", I'd feel irritated that they're making up words. I don't know where you're based Marcus, so I don't know if it's another U.S. v. British English thing. Would it be fine in a U.S. forecast?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcuslangford

UK, but i admit i haven't heard it in a long time and i was thinking, "Why haven't i heard it since i was young" when i wrote the sentence above.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tina_in_Bristol
Tina_in_Bristol
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Well, I'm not young (sad to say), but can't recall ever hearing that one, even as a child. Unless it was an idiosyncrasy of one particular forecaster, in one particular region? If we grow up with something, it's easy to assume it's common everywhere, even if the reality is it's unique to one person. One of my pet hates with forecasts is: "spits-and-spots of rain". I know what is meant, of course, but is this phrase ever used outside forecasts? I might say: "There's rain in the air", or: "I think I felt a spot of rain", but I'd never describe the weather as: "spits-and-spots of rain."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brijsven
Brijsven
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Het onweer - the thunderstorm

De storm - the storm

De windkracht - the wind-force


  • achterstallige huur. - "hanging gale"

  • Het bleef stormachtig. - "The weather remained stormy."

  • Wachten tot de storm voorbij is. - "Wait out the storm."

  • Een vliegende storm. - "A violent storm/gale."

  • De barometer staat op storm. - "The barometer indicates stormy weather."

  • De storm ging liggen. - "The storm/gale calmed down/died down/subsided."

  • Windkracht 0/12 - "Calm/hurricane force (winds)."

  • Windkracht 7 - (Wind) force 7

  • Harde wind - (Wind) force 7-10

  • Stormachtige wind - (Wind) force 8


Many of these examples were pulled from Van Dale -- primarily the latter examples concerning windkracht.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Liefhebber
Liefhebber
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waarom moet ik 'onweer' als 'thunderstormS' vertalen?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raahiba
Raahiba
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The Dutch word onweer is uncountable, but the English word thunderstorm isn't, so you need to translate it as either a thunderstorm or thunderstorms.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mezzopiana
mezzopiana
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Shouldn't 'thunder' also be accepted correct as a translation for onweer?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raahiba
Raahiba
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With the support of my trusty Van Dale I'll suggest that 'thunder' would be incomplete - 'onweer' refers to a storm with both thunder (donder) and lightning (bliksem).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vortarulo
Vortarulo
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I wish English had a word like "unweather", just like German and Dutch. =)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joelson00

Actually, the clouds cannot predict anything. We make the prediction based upon our observation of the clouds. For this reason the translation 'foreshadow' is better than 'predict'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelsieb
Kelsieb
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I used "portend" which is correct, but it was judged wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tina_in_Bristol
Tina_in_Bristol
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Probably too late now, but just report it. "Portend" is a fairly uncommon word, but I think it's justified in what is quite an odd sentence anyway. I think, in this context, we might use: "foreshadow", "portend", or even: "threaten". The original Dutch doesn't really carry the connotation of threat, but a thunderstorm is rarely considered a good thing, so I think, in English, "threaten" would be perfectly fine (for weather that isn't ;) )

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susanne1986
Susanne1986
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Waarom is 'the clouds predict thunderstorm' fout?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tina_in_Bristol
Tina_in_Bristol
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Because, with the singular, there has to be an article in English. You can "predict A thunderstorm", or "predict thunderstorms" (plural), but not: "predict thunderstorm".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susanne1986
Susanne1986
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Thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/avapirev

I type "the clouds predict thunderstorm". It gives error by saying it should be "thuderstorms" - plural. ???

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tina_in_Bristol
Tina_in_Bristol
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See my answer to Susanne, above. In English, it's NOT an uncountable noun, like Dutch "onweer". So you can have: "thunderstorms", or: "a thunderstorm", but not just: "thunderstorm".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Micki_83
Micki_83
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Is onweer both singular and plural? If I'm not mistaken it was translated as 'thunderstorms' in one sentence and here as 'a thunderstorm'. How do I know which one duo wants?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brijsven
Brijsven
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Singular

Het onweer

Plural

De onweren

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emak02
emak02
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Ik heb nog nooit gehoord dat iemand zei 'de onweren'. Dus ik denk dat dat niet gebruikelijk is.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/louis.vang
louis.vang
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When there are thunderstorms in different places, you can say 'onweren'.

Het aantal onweren is sterk gestegen door de opwarming van de aarde.

Onweren zijn onvermijdelijk bij deze temperaturen.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emak02
emak02
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But then you don't use 'de onweren' only 'onweren'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
Mod
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The plural of het onweer = de onweren (www.vandale.nl).

While the plural may not be used often it is not wrong, e.g.:

The reason why the plural is not used a lot is more than likely the presence of the verb onweren. Also since onweer is often accompanied by rain one would generally use onweersbuien.

So in short:

  • De onweren is the plural of het onweer.
  • De onweren is rarely used, instead one would generally use de onweersbuien (probably to avoid confusion with the verb and since it is often accompanied by rain).
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/louis.vang
louis.vang
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De onweren volgen elkaar sneller op. De kracht van de onweren in Europa werd sterk onderschat.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raahiba
Raahiba
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According to Van Dale it is a countable noun, but I can't recall hearing anyone use the plural onweren (I'm not native Dutch). In English I'd say this sentence could be either, with a leaning towards 'thunderstorms' as it's more general.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarlTipton1

I think preceed might be a but more common foreshadow in English. Foreshadow is quite archaic sounding

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tina_in_Bristol
Tina_in_Bristol
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Firstly, I suppose you mean "precede"? But even if so, it doesn't mean the same. Precede is simply to go before something, but doesn't have the element of prediction. "Foreshadow" may be a bit old-fashioned, and even quite rare these days, but still captures the meaning better than "precede".

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royston18240

Foreshadow??? What kind of word is that?? Are there any English scholars on the translation team?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joelson00

Foreshadow is a very good English word, even though it might not be in everyone's active vocabulary. Google finds it over two million times.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tina_in_Bristol
Tina_in_Bristol
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Completely agree! Use of this word suggests a high command of English, so yes, there probably are some English Scholars on the translation team! Although it's a relatively uncommon word, I don't think there are many that precisely capture "voorspellen". It has to be "predict", "foretell", "foreshadow", or something of that sort.

9 months ago