https://www.duolingo.com/brunolencin

What's the difference between "me neither" and "me either"?

I have that doubt, if you can help me, i'll be thankful :)

February 4, 2015

11 Comentários


https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
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Em geral, pode-se dizer que:

  • Me either = eu também
  • Me neither = nem eu (no sentido de "eu também não").
February 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Lahure
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Eu concordo com Danmoller aqui, sem dúvida! A forma 'either' implica a positiva, e 'neither' implica a negativa no meu idioma. Alguns exemplos para ilustrar as diferenças entre as duas palavras.

  1. Nem eu nem a minha esposa nem meus filhos gostamos de peixe - Neither I nor my wife nor my children like fish
  2. Either of them - Qualquer dos dois
  3. I have not seen either one or the other - Eu não vi nem um nem o outro.
  4. He neither studies nor works - Ele nem estuda nem trabalha.
February 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/RalfGuth

I am impressed. You talk portuguese very well. Good job!

February 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/brunolencin

thanks! it's a very simple explanation but very useful too

February 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/littlecass

Thanks!

February 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/.R.B.
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There's no difference, you can say "me neither" or "me either" in everyday language. Keep in mind that for formal usage you need to say "Neither do I".

I don't think Obama is going to win

(Informal) Me neither/either or (Formal) I don't either or Neither do I

Bear in mind that you are not disagreeing here, on the contrary, you're agreeing with a negative statement...if you do want to disagree, you say the opposite "I think he's going to win" or "I think Vermin Supreme will win!"

Just for the record, the other way around would be:

I think Obama is going to win the election

If you think the same, if you think Obama is going to win, you can say "I think so too" 'so' here means Obama wining. You can also say, "So do I" or "me too" or "I do too" or "I agree". Any of these would be fine. Remember, you can't say "I too". To disagree you say,"I don't", "I don't think so", or, very simple, "I disagree"

PS: you do not have a doubt, you have a question. To know why....http://goo.gl/nUcpfv

February 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Sir-Bender

Vermin Supreme kkkkkkk "When I'm President Everyone Gets A Free Pony!"

February 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Lahure
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Hi Tom - could I possibly suggest that the colloquial use of 'dúvida' in Portuguese might imply 'question' in that language? It seems to me that most of the queries which I reply to here refer to 'dúvida' and not 'questão' or 'pergunta' or question. Most likely my response here will be corrected by native Portuguese speakers though.

February 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/.R.B.
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Yes. In English, the word doubt has to do with uncertainty, indecision, or disbelief. In Portuguese the word dúvida has to do with uncertainty, indecision, disbelief AND with not understanding something, which is usually the reason why Portuguese speakers tend to say "I have a doubt" instead of "I have a question"!

Eu tenho uma dúvida or Eu tenho uma pergunta = I have a question

Eu duvido = I doubt

Se você estiver com dúvidas, sinta-se a vontade para perguntar = If you have any questions, feel free to ask

February 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/brunolencin

thanks guy! for the another tip too, it will be useful

February 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Manu-moura

Thank you ,Tom. Your explanation it was excellent.

February 7, 2015
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