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"Tengo que volver al hogar."

Translation:I have to return home.

5 years ago

74 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

So Duo uses hogar for home. I understand that a + el = al. I understand that the 'a' is needed as it is movement towards the object. Hogar is the object noun and it therefore needs an article and here it is 'the' (al doesn't get translated because it isn't needed in English). This is a review for me and I hope it may help others.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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But it is interesting that Casa is often translated as home because when you use it without an article it does mean your own house. Hogar does mean home, but always requires the article. So tengo que volver a la casa means I have to return to the house (may or may not be yours) but both Tengo que volver al hogar and tengo que volver a casa essentially mean I have to return home.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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good explanation!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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It's only unneeded because the English word "home" is also an adverb, which is something i find cool.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

A verb too! ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kelly.wolf2

And an adjective!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

I hear "Tengo que volver a lugar" every time :'(

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertGenta
RobertGenta
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me too!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

I had that problem too but try this. After you have been marked wrong try this. Hit the sound button and force your self to look at the screen where you wrote, "Tengo que volver a lugar." And that is what you will hear. Now hit the sound button again, but force yourself to look at the correct answer in red where it says, "Tengo que volver al hogar." And it is very likely that is what you will hear or at least you will begin to hear that "h" sound. Two things will increase the effect. 1.) If you are looking at the speakers lips. 2.) If the context of the conversation would lead you to expect "hogar" such as "I have to return home I left my keys there." There is a name for this and it is called the McGurk effect. What we see and hear is strongly affected by what we expect.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blglenn1

What a great tip! Thanks!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Well the McGurk effect may work well, and replaying the sound while watching the words may help quite a bit But dont expect to start hearing h in Spanish (or Italian, French or Portuguese) because it is always silent. Because the h is silent, the final l in al blends into the word hogar. So the only sonic difference between those two sentences is the difference between that o or u. That makes this quite subtle and this is probably a sentence that would be misunderstood by native speakers out of context. Of course the grammatically correct other sentence would have al lugar as well, which also subtly and very slightly changes the pronunciation. But context and taking advantage of what you understand about how Spanish is put together help, especially as the latter increases over time.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/B5Jasmine
B5Jasmine
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come back should be allowed too

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KatrinaMac4

Who uses hogar for home?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

Certainly not any of my Spanish friends in this context! They would always use "a casa".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Do you know why it is "a casa" but "al hogar"? According to DL both are correct, but hogar uses a definite article and casa does not.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John__Doe
John__Doe
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casa = home, la casa = house

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaiah718543

Because "a casa" is an idiom.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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This was an old question, which I now know the answer to, so I'll elaborate as there are a few misconceptions in the discussions. "A casa" is not an idiom. Nor is it simply "casa"="home" while "la casa"="house." In this sentence "casa" is actually an adverb. Just as in English it is being used as an adverb of place, adding information to the verb "return." As such it requires no noun article. The reason "Tengo que volver al hogar" requires the "el" is because it is actually saying "I have to return to home" where "home" is a noun. "Tengo que volver a casa" says "I have to return home" where "home" is an adverb.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KathyNS4

Mine, too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

The Spanish language home magazine titled "El Hogar"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AviAdventure
AviAdventure
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Why can't I say, "I have to go home"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

Go = ir

Return/go back = volver

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spikypsyche
spikypsyche
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See, I have the same problem, and while I understand the ir/volver(/venir/llegar) difference, I had been under the impression that "go home" would generally be translated with volver as the "back" is implicit in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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That's a fair point. If we were talking about returning home in everyday conversation we would nearly always just say "I have to go home" because, as you say, the returning is implicit (because it is your home and somewhere you have naturally been before). It is probably only after a long absence or distance travelled that we might say "I have to return home." So I guess it comes down to whether the same is true in Spanish, which a native speaker would have to answer.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susan_Skelly
Susan_Skelly
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Without context, both answers should be accepted as correct.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/90DayFluent

You wouldn't return to the home, you would either return to the house or return home

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheAwesomeClair

'I must return to the home' is strictly translating. If you translate more loosly, it's just 'I must return home'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anthonyhill780

Why is i have to return to home wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cohalan

"I have to return to my home " is hardly incorrect !!??

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

"My" = "mi" - they did not use the word "mi" in this example

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cohalan

You are literally correct, but translation from one language to another is not a literal process. PS I think that the translation programme (software) should be revisited to include a larger database of "correct" answers. I have noted the understandable frustration of other users of the system since I started to read the correspondence e.g. I was also marked incorrect for "lay the table" rather than "set the table" (poner). Just as Spanish, as spoken and written, in Spain is a little different to Spanish in Latin America - so is the English in England and Ireland different to English in North America

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

True, but in Duo they don't allow word omissions/changes/additions.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonathanbost
jonathanbost
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I said "I have to return to home." Why is this not accepted?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dsoodmand
dsoodmand
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Why doesn't this sentence need "me" as in "Me tengo que volver al hogar" when (in my mind) similar sentences in this lesson require the reflexive?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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Because "volver" already means what we need it to mean. "ir" doesn't, but "irse" is the right word for this type of thing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dsoodmand
dsoodmand
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I see, thank you! I suppose now it's a matter of learning which verbs are reflexive so I can use the pronouns correctly.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KatrinaMac4

None of the verbs are reflexive, but I can see where you would get that idea.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trinh.le.9

I translated the sentence as "I have to come back home" and it was marked wrong. Can someone help me explain?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaiah718543

In my opinion, "come back" implies somebody else is there waiting for you or that you are still there and maybe taking about coming back in the future. If they were talking to you they'd likely say "I wish you would come back" or "come back soon" but saying you have to "return" is something more universal that you could use whether you're currently there or not and whether or not somebody is there for you to return to. One of those language nuances. But think about it - it sounds a little strange if somebody were to say "I miss home - I have to come back there" because they would say "I have to go back..."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

I guess they haven't added it to their database of acceptable answers. Did you report it?

http://www.spanishdict.com/translation

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KatrinaMac4

That is the meaning but not the direct translation. That's all I can think of

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/r3ck0rd
r3ck0rd
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I have not learned the word "el hogar"...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adrianbyrd123

Would a more literal translation be i must return to the house ???

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

No, I think the most literal translation is "I have to return home"

Tener que = have to. Deber = must (Duo uses these interchangeably)

Hogar = home. Casa = house

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaiah718543

I thought deber = should and "must" is more along the lines of "tener que" (have to) or "necesitar" (need/need to)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susan_Skelly
Susan_Skelly
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Why can't you translate this as "I have to go home"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pollypocketpike

i said Hearth instead of home, hearth is also correct, look it up... im sad again!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kevinmkilroy

"Hearth" is now accepted, FYI. In fact, it was the suggested correct response for me, which threw me a bit.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ACW88

Isn't case home?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/megann__

why al?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/louiejackjr

Why can i not say "I have to return TO home?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahLushk1

I put: I have to return to the house. But it was marked wrong....why?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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"Hogar" holds the same sentiment in Spanish as "home" holds in English. That is to say it is more than just a house. Think of sayings like "make this house a home" or the strategic reason building companies might say "show-home" instead of "show-house." To say your sentence you would need to use "casa" with the definite article retained: Tengo que volver a la casa.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahLushk1

OK! Thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arwen288990

I typed " I have to go home." it was right. :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eddie809124

I put "I have to return to the house" and it was marked wrong, replacing "house" with "hearth". What?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Hogar means home or hearth. Those concepts have been traditionally mixed since cavemen first gathered their families around a fire. The hearth is where you gather for warmth and light and social interaction and traditionally also cooked food.

Tengo que volver a la casa is I have to return to the house. That is basically word for word. I have to return home (that is to where you make your home) is a little more complex. In Spanish when you use Casa without an article, it is generally translated as home, because it does mean YOUR house. So tengo que volver a casa (not a la casa) is generally translated as I have to go home. The house is often used when home could be used, but if you are setting out from another house to which you have to return you wouldn't say home. Tengo que volver al hogar would be translated as I have to return home if you were outside your home. But, assuming you have a fireplace, if you said it on your home, it would be translated as hearth. This is one of the downsides to accepting many translations: it can cause strange corrections and suggestions.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SelmaPatty
SelmaPatty
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Hearth? WTH?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Hogar means home or hearth. Those concepts are closely linked in a sort of emotional historic way. I have often said that the problem with including all possible translations is that an unusual one may come up as a suggested correct answer.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elyoungnc

Hearth is not ocrrect

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Hearth is actually a correct translation of hogar, although it certainly is not the most probable translation of this sentence.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Hogar

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReeceRJD

Està la niña aún en tu casa?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hoziab

Hearth?!?! Who says hearth? I have been using house for hogar

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blglenn1

Has anyone else experienced the struggle of hearing the distinct and separate words? I understand that with repitition and increased comprehension will come the understanding of context. However, are there any tips from native Spanish speakers for listening and separating the spoken words? For example: I learned that words ending in letters :NORSEL are masculine, which helps apply Lo.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Rules about the gender of nouns based on their last letter are always problematic. Even the o for masculine and a for feminine rule has many, many exceptions. Then I see your acronym begins with an n. Well all nouns ending in ción and sión are feminine, and there are quite a few of them, so that destroys that rule from the get go. The only real solution to gender issues is to learn the article with the noun and remember about words with a stressed initial à sound like agua and águila which use el in the singular but are still femmine. This will also help when it comes to doubly gendered nouns that change meaning depending on the gender.

To me, the secret to understanding spoken Spanish is to become very familiar with the way the sentences are out together. Spanish is one of the fastest spoken languages, so it does take time. When I first was listening I never heard little important words like he, has and há in the present perfect construction. But I learned that the past participle has a distintive sound, so I began recognizing where I should have heard it. The biggest problem for me was always recognizing when the sentence had a named subject which was placed after the verb since, if the subject were a subject pronoun it might well be omitted. This makes it possible to take the subject as a direct object of the wrong subject. Once you find the subject and the verb, the rest becomes easier. But play a lot between the fast and slow buttons. It helps. And always, always make sure you are repeating the sentences outloud, whether or not you use the pronunciation feature on Duo. Making your own mouth mimic the flow from sound to sound will help you hear as well.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geliee1298

Why is "I have to return back home" not considered?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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That is actually somewhat redundant in English. Return means to go back or to come back. The back after return is not needed and there is nothing in the Spanish to suggest it should be there. In non Germanic language like Spanish which doesn't have phrasal verbs like come back and go back it would seem especially strange.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mess1Fan10

It made me put "I must return to the home"

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErlendKamr
ErlendKamr
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Hearth is home? What

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/antonmo

I forgot what hogar was. It rhymed with lugar, could it be some place? then I wrote it and my phone showed me the home icon. oh of course. home. E.T. wants to go home...

2 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheTexan1984

I have to go home?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

I think that to go home would use ir rather than volver. Not miles apart in meaning but they are different verbs ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PierreDeflaux

Ihavetocomebackhomeiscorrectimahundredpercentsureofthis

4 years ago