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https://www.duolingo.com/ValerianaCoyote

La Llorona inquiry

I realize that the song La Llorona has many different versions, featuring multiple verses & multiple artists. I am at least somewhat familiar with the legend: As I have gathered (in brief summary), The Weeping Woman- angered by her husband’s attention towards his progeny that no longer extends towards her- has thrown her children into the river but is immediately repentant, and thusly found dead on the banks the next day. And so her ghost wails afterwards. But, in several of the versions, it seems that the lyrics address Llorona in a romantic fashion? Does anyone know why this would be? And furthermore, in the version with which I am the most familiar, the last verse states: “Si ya te he dado la vida, Llorona/Que mas quieres?” If I have already given you life? How have they given her life? While perhaps a departure from a purely language-based thread, I am curious and thought to post to this forum. Any insight into these questions or thoughts/comments on La Llorona in general is of interest & appreciated (as I am not exactly an expert in Mexican folklore!)! Thanks!

3 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/RitaCunas
RitaCunas
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There's some debate about whether or not the song and the legend originate from the same source. Even if they do, there are a few versions of the story. One has the woman loving a man who does not love her back, and in her desperation she kills her children and herself. That one seems more in line with the song lyrics. "Aunque la vida me cueste, no dejare de quererte." That line seems very much to refer to unrequited love.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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Excellent question!!

My guess (but it is only a guess): perhaps it is her dead children saying that they have already given their life. She's crying, but what more do they have to give?

If you like this story (and song), and if you're interested in Mexican culture, you will enjoy the following short. A friend of mine introduced me to it a couple of years ago when we were talking about el Día de los Muertos. http://youtu.be/6Jaox1nnMc0

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharmingTiger
CharmingTiger
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WOW!

This is one of the best short films I have ever seen!

Muchísimas gracias, Maestro de explicaciones ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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Gracias por el enlace!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ValerianaCoyote

Gracias Lrtward. La peliculita es hermosa. Vcel10, lo hiciste?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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no todavía . . . Yo estoy en mi trabajo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ValerianaCoyote

nono, i was wondering if you made the film in fact! i thought perhaps you were the friend Lrt had mentioned who had made it, and that you were expressing thanks passing on the link. i suppose not! :) & that you were just enjoying the little movie as well! i don't know why that's what first came to my mind.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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hacer = to do, make . . . . Sorry, my reading comprenhension failed me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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La Llorona has been interpreted in many ways as a cartoon, horror film and many songs. Me gusta la versión de Lila Downs, muy jazzy.

There's a long wikipedia page about the song. It may be one of those songs/legends that have many interpretations like "Cielito Lindo"

3 years ago

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