"Avrei dato un occhio per vedere lo spettacolo."

Translation:I would have given an eye to see the show.

August 8, 2013

26 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ackworth

It's a bit extreme, isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrevKAllred

It's worth it though. The show was seriously amazing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duncan_whyte

Too bad he couldn't see it, having lost his eye


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnrush

Self-defeating. Because it would then be harder to see the show.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dino705106

That is why in Canada we only give an arm and a leg.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoyceA

I said "I would have given anything to see the show." The owl wasn't having any of it -- he wanted "an eye" or "an arm" or nothing at all. I guess I should be grateful he wasn't insisting on a "right arm." Meh. I heard the show wasn't that great anyway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dlmoore28944

I would have given an arm and a leg!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/higashinishi

You would have need to go to the gate of truth


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dino705106

Duo thinks that is a bit extreme. He will settle for just an arm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RayAtkinson

I would give my right arm to be ambidextrous.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wiplala

I would have given my left ear. (since it is not functioning anymore anyway) :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HenrikUth

Why can't I 'watch' the show?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sedona2007

vedere => to see
guardare => to watch
The owl is very picky about these.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keeper.here

why is 'spectacle' not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElspethNina

presumably this is an actual Italian idiom - which would probably translate to "my right arm"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sofia222677

It's NOT an Italian idiom, but just a made-up phrase by Duolingo. I'm Italian and also checked on dictionaries just to be sure.

Now, "dare un occhio a qualcuno/qualcosa" is an actual expression meaning "to check on someone", "to have a look at something".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Donata930481

I thought 'da un occhio' would translate as 'give my eyeteeth' but Duo wouldn't accept it. I've never heard anyone in England say they would 'give an eye'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sofia222677

It's not an Italian idiom either.

An idiom involving an eye is "costare un occhio della testa" (to cost an arm and a leg), but it's used to say that something is very expensive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anemona11

i think a common expression would be: I would have given my right hand to see the show.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/warikl

Why is 'see the spectacle' wrong? DL said 'see the play'. But I hardly see that as a direct translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/john585666

I would give my right hand to play the piano like Benjamin Grosvenor.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IntegrationAsh

Or Paul Wittgenstein?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/john585666

That is dark humour but I like it, it is funny.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/john585666

Oh well, with one eye you can still see the show, but I shouldn't make a habit of it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gooley

Thanks for a good chuckle .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clairemenzies

I thought this was equivalent to the English idiom of giving an arm & a leg, but this wasn’t accepted

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