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"You had cut the cheese."

Translation:Ustedes habían cortado el queso.

5 years ago

55 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Sir_Carl
Sir_Carl
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This sentence proves that Duolingo has a sense of humor.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beatlefreak1

There certainly is a lot of "cutting the cheese" around here!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AliceHerol

I got this one after "We had heard that."

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OldSpiceGuy
OldSpiceGuy
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To "cut the cheese" is an American English idiom for "pass gas". Does this follow through to the Spanish?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeyDC65

It does not. Probably the closest Spanish equivalents are «Echarse un pedo» or «Tirarse un pedo». So for the "passing gas" meaning of this sentence, you could say «Te habías tirado un pedo».

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

Now this is useful Spanish!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CrazyCat28

This is the reason i took Spanish lol

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonBastian
JonBastian
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I like how the concept in Spanish is to throw or shot a fart.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dansmisterdans

At
http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=tirarse%20un%20pedo
one of the definitions for "tirarse un pedo" was "trump"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t.winkler
t.winkler
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I wonder if there are any idioms in different latin countries which do not use the word fart explicitly. Always nice to know them before you use them unintended.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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The euphemisms that I know of in Spanish are unusual enough combinations of words that you are unlikely to drop an unintentionally rude phrase into conversation, and instead it is phrases with rude words that become casual slang for something that you can say politely.

Here is a rundown of all the poot terms I could find. Like I said, it is hard to imagine dropping these into conversation without meaning to.

Flatulencia is the most polite term. Mal aire is a little more rude and probably the most likely to be said accidentally.

Pederse is the slang verb that will be understood almost anywhere, as will tirarse un pedo, and pedo is the noun.

In the Rio Plata area some say tirarse un cuete

In Puerto Rico a loud and smelly one is a foyon, otherwise it is un peo

Someone who farts a lot is a supitero in Peru.

You should know that pedo in slang can also mean "problem", and it can mean "drunk". And if you are interested, it is Mexico that holds the crown for the most creative and varied usages of pedo as well as the most astonishingly varied slang terms anywhere. The list needs to be seen to be believed.

Important Edit: I had forgotten entirely the one place where it is easy to make a mistake and say the wrong thing.

  • Gasioso = Funny, bubbly and humorous
  • Gaseoso = I have gas

Be careful.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nomadcanuck

i like how tirarse contains the word arse, makes it easy to remember

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lesprit_de_l...

*Gracioso (funny), not gacioso. Which has nothing to do with bubbly. And 'gaseoso' means 'gaseous', not 'I have gas'.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrendanCla10

On the flip side, in Mexico (and maybe elsewhere, not sure), "que pedo", or 'what farts' is a way of saying 'what's up?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eGhost57
eGhost57
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pfft

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danisaidman
danisaidman
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To cut.... is "cortar" el queso..... in other cases we have the example as divided..... and the answer that duolingo gives is "partido"......that is wrong as well....partido is to brake...like roto....you can use repartido...that is to share.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

Cortado - had cut is correct

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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My dictionary says PARTIR is to leave. Seems like a weird verb in this sentence,

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lewhen
Lewhen
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"Partir" can mean: "to break", "to leave" and "to divide", and informally at least here in Mexico it can also mean "to blow/hit/punch"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Gracias, senor.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lewhen
Lewhen
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De nada :).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amakatner

I just don't understand why when you tap 'cut' in the sentence, it doesn't give you 'partido' or 'partir' -- I was completely lost on this one...

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heather.ow1
heather.ow1Plus
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Phew

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeffyV
JeffyV
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He who smelt it dealt it!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marioluigi84

No! I dis not cut the cheese! You did,Duo! Wait, birds can fart?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/volkei
volkeiPlus
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Uufff...stinky<sub>~</sub>~

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dingo8baby

And we could all smell it

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lumosmockingjay

Duo accepted "cortado" for me, can that be used interchangeably with "partido?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/icepalace
icepalace
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I was way off here. In present tense "You have to cut the cheese" is "Tienes que cortar/partir el queso," Is there a way to use tener? Such as "Tuviste que cortido/partido el queso" ? Or are any past tenses of "to have/must" going to use haber?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeyDC65

Close. The past tense of "You had to cut the cheese" would be «Tuviste/Tenías que partir el queso» depending on if you need to use preterite or imperfect.

I bolded the "to" in the sentence because there is a distinct difference between the original sentence presented and the one we're translating here. "You had cut the cheese" means you cut it prior to some other action. "You had to cut the cheese" means it was an action you were required to do at some point in the past. The imperfect would suggest it was something you had to do on an ongoing basis whereas the preterite would suggest it was something you had to do once.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DVeeD

After the third sentence about cheese I finally realized what duolingo was talking about :P

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jovanpayne
jovanpayne
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'Habíais partido el queso' is accepted. Nice to know conventional Spanish is accepted even though it is not taught.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MishalaRay
MishalaRay
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Im having a problem with words like this "cut" is past tense so i used "cortó". When is it acceptable to use this version of the word?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RaviFernan
RaviFernan
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"cortó" would be the translation of "cut" as in "He cut the cheese" (past tense). (Tú conjugation: cortaste.) Here we're using the past perfect tense ("You had cut the cheese"), which requires a different conjugation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keldration

They get my mind on farting and it ruins my concentration! I wonder why they don't change this. It's too funny for me--really.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/H2wk3ye

I agree. Duolingo has a sense of humor.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/janwoni

OMG I DID IT: O

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErlendKamr
ErlendKamr
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I would buy a t-shirt that says that

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheArtsyWolf

More DL jokes...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GoranGoranovic

DuoLingo gustan a partir de queso

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SWilliamsJ
SWilliamsJ
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Can someone explain why is "Tù había cortado el queso" incorrect? I'm on the app and can't access the notes.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LazCon
LazCon
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I believe the tú form requires the 's' ... Tú habías.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lesprit_de_l...

.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhyllisHar11

I used cortar for cut, why was it marked wrong?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeauGillespie

Yo hubiese dicho cortar en vez de partir

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marilyn116916

When I had the cotrect answer it continues to say it is in correct

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luchita347407

I like this one as much as "You're a dead man!"

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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I wonder if they would acccept "Tú habías pasado el queso"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/unicyclegrant

Way to throw a pedo...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NaeshaMoree

I have never heard "partido" as "party" but Duolingo just used it as that a few questions ago. I knew it wasn't the other two options so I got it correct. Is this true or a mistake?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J_oseBravo

"partido" it's not usual, "cortado" is better.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/david795616

Vosotros habíais...¿siempre 'ustedes'?...En español de España sólo se usa en determinadas ocasiones formales...Y cada vez menos..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Josluiv

Has vs Habías?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anna235705

What happened to the verb cortar? Partido means match

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/uUIN5oDT

This proves that duolingo teaches me words and frases i will never use.

1 year ago