"Ladmigkøbefrokosttildig."

Translation:Let me buy you lunch.

3 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ZL321
ZL321
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Imperative, eh?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-HKBK-
-HKBK-
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I'm a bit confused aboyt the V2 situation here. Could someone explain why this sentence does not have V2 order?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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This sentence is in imperative, so it drops the subject.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edalgas
edalgas
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I translated it as "Let me buy lunch for you." Not imperative, and polite.

The traslation given, "Let me buy you lunch", I would translate as "Lad mig købe dig frokost."

Am I right, or wrong?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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You're right. But to be fair, both versions should be accepted since they're fairly equivalent.
Also, every of these sentences is grammatically imperative. Note how you lose the subject.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edalgas
edalgas
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Thanks for confirming my thoughts RyagonIV! And yes, I have seen several example here of just that, as a translation is not always literal.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mingan8
Mingan8
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Shouldn't there be an article (at least in the English version)? This sounds very strange.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZL321
ZL321
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No, it's very common English usage.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mingan8
Mingan8
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Google Ngram search agrees with you . But it still sounds strange. Where did the article go?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZL321
ZL321
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Eh, it's just English for you, really.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicholasCh5
NicholasCh5
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Do you mean lack of preposition? If so, it's because in English we can swap the order of the objects. We can put direct object then indirect (which requires a preposition in between) Eg. I am writing a letter TO her Or we can put indirect object then direct (no preposition required) Eg. I am writing her a letter

You don't need to say I am writing to her a letter. .. for me, that would sound strange and unnecessary

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mingan8
Mingan8
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No, no. I expected the sentence to be Let me buy you a lunch. As mentioned in my previous comment, according to Ngram search, it's used both ways but the one without the article is much more common.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Asche42
Asche42
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Yes buy lunch is much more common and sounds natural, like make food, buy (some) clothes. It seems to me that those are considered partitives in English (like butter). Meaning, you will most likely buy (some) butter than buy a butter (which would mean one block of butter). Those are idioms that are different from language to language, you have to "bruteforce" the most common cases.

3 years ago
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