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"The Netherlands is proud of its team."

Translation:Nederland is trots op zijn ploeg.

3 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/kaybekwa

why haar?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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This is one of the rare cases where you can see if de woorden are masculine or feminine. Some other examples:

  • de vereniging en haar leden
  • de regering en haar ministers
  • het kabinet en zijn ministers
  • de stad en haar inwoners
  • Groningen en zijn inwoners

Because it's so rare for the distinction between masculine and feminine nouns to be noticeable, native speakers (myself included, had to look up the genders above) will make mistakes in this as well. For this reason I try to avoid these kind of sentences. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/empathephant
empathephant
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Are countries in general going to be female? They are in English, along with ships and cars.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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I'm not sure about countries, but schip is neuter, so it's het schip en zijn bemanning (the ship and its crew), auto is masculine, so it also uses zijn (FYI I had to look that up). On the other hand, for ships and cars proprer nouns are often used de Titanic en zijn/haar schoorstenen (the Titanic and its chimneys) and de Toyota en zijn/haar paardekrachten (the Toyota and its horsepower*), to be honest I'm not too sure about these. Personally I try to avoid these kind of sentences. :)

If you want to learn more, have a look at these links (in Dutch):

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
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(Sorry for a late reply)

Names of countries and cities are neuter. Therefore, only 'zijn' is correct. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilmolleggi
ilmolleggi
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Yeah but isn't it het land?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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I think writingeek is referring to English, which can be completely different from Dutch with regards to this. I'm only talking about Dutch in my posts.

In Dutch it's indeed het land en zijn inwoners, so I guess for most (all?) countries zijn will be used. Keep in mind that using synonyms can sometimes change the gender, but not change the meaning at all (e.g. my kabinet/regering example above).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilmolleggi
ilmolleggi
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Oh I see! Thank you :)

Still I was wondering, in compund nound it is usually the last item which decides the gender, so how come Nederland is considered feminine here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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My first thought: because it's wrong. Van Dale also mentions it's neuter. Thanks for paying attention, let me check with the team, I wouldn't want to claim to be an expert here. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mkk030572
mkk030572
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According to the given solution both, "zijn" and "haar", are correct, but that implies, that the gender of "Netherland" is masculine as well as feminine. Of course the grammatical gender of a noun should be one of these two but not both...

2 years ago