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  5. "De har en dotter och en son."

"De har en dotter och en son."

Translation:They have a daughter and a son.

February 6, 2015

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MonsieurCal

the Swedish 'dotter' is so much nicer than the wierd 'daughter'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hrafnunga

Agreed. All of the Scandinavian languages have a nicer word for it (datter, dotter, dóttir). All of the west Germanic languages include some kind of gh/ch/kh (yiddish), and they all pronounce it except English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarksAaron

Technically, it's the Scandinavian languages and English that lost the gh/ch/kh sound, not the other languages gaining it. Persian has a great cognate - [dox'tær] is "girl/daughter"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hrafnunga

That's what I meant, but I was speaking from an English background so in comparison they are extra letters/sounds.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ungewitig_Wiht

But knowing German and its relationship with English did finally explain to me why we have this weird spelling daughter when we say dauter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/finkrer

Well, Icelandic does not include these, but the h sound is still there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

English has it in the spelling but has lost it in the pronunciation. Norse entirely lost it (hence it not being in the spelling of any Scandinavian language), but Icelandic has re-evolved it (dóttir is pronounced *douhtir).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greece666

Adding an image to such phrases could be fun + help the learning process.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabinaHatc

It sounds like she says "Dom har en..." Not "De har..." Can anyone else hear this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

De/dem is always pronounced /dom/.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PoszLaszlo

Cold you tell me, what's the different between 'de' and 'det'? Tack!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hrafnunga

de is "they", unless it is used as a definite article immediately before an adjective for a plural noun, in which case it is "the". E.g. de gröna bilarna = the green cars. det is either third person singular neuter "it" or the definite article immediately before the adjective for a singular neuter (et) noun. Furthermore, den is either third person common gender (en) or the definite article for singular common nouns with an adjective.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PoszLaszlo

Tank you! It was a typo, I would like to ask, what's the different between de and dem!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hrafnunga

Dem is the accusative/object form of de and means "them".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hornedhorse9

My gf from uppsala says de. As "de" whats up with that ??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Since I don't know her, I have no idea as to her reasons. Some Swedes might say it like that in the mistaken belief that it's more correct du to mimicking written language. Unless she's a Swedish-speaking Finlander, in which case it's natural to say it as "de".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Antti22

Yep, that's how we pronounce it in Finland


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BWolfBurak

So they and them are readen same; as dom. It is not a problem in spoken language??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Not really. Since they're typically never both grammatical in the same context, it's virtually impossible to confuse them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelO-J

Except in old-fashioned Swedish and Finland Swedish where de is pronounced like English dee and dem rhymes with them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paularizing

In German, "Dotter" is used to describe the yellow thing in the egg ("yolk" in English)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Interesting. It's en gula in Swedish, literally 'a yellow' :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paularizing

a synonym to "Dotter" is "Eigelb", the translation would be "eggyellow". This is closer to the Swedish word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Btw the full Swedish word is äggula, which is even more like Eigelb, but if it's clear from context what is meant, you can say just gula instead.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teslorien

I know this seems odd, but when do I pronounce "och" differently? Sometimes only the "o" is slightly pronounced but other times the entire word itself is pronounced. Can anybody enlighten me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

You can normally hear the k-sound only when och is stressed:

Jag har både hund o katt.

-Har du katt eller hund?
-Både och.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trygvasson

"Och en" Is this pronounced "O-ck_en". Otherwise "och" is just "o".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

Since "och" is normally not stressed in this sentence, it's pronounced "o" (or "å").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Baba7249

I also heard a very distinct "k" sound in this recording


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rags99

The difference is mainly colloquial, really. Speaking fast you just say "o"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/matthew583808

How would i know dom is de in audio? Especially fast


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

What do you mean? The word de is always pronounced dom in standard Swedish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelO-J

Standard Sweden Swedish. It's still usually pronounced the old-fashioned way in Standard Finland-Swedish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yes, sure. I usually make the distinction but not always.

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