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  5. "Andiamo ad Amsterdam."

"Andiamo ad Amsterdam."

Translation:We are going to Amsterdam.

August 9, 2013

58 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/infinitum17

uhh, why Amsterdam? I'd like to start learning what the Italians call their own cities, seems like that would be much more useful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LlamaNation01

Florence = Firenze, Naples = Napoli, Milan = Milano, Sicily = Sicilia, Rome = Roma, Genoa = Genova Just a few :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lorendani

REGIONS OF ITALY:
Aosta Valley=Valle d'Aosta
Piedmont=Piemonte
Lombardy=Lombardia
South Tyrol=Alto Adige Tuscany=Toscana
Latium=Lazio
Apulia=Puglia
Sicily=Sicilia
Sardinia=Sardegna

OTHER ITALIAN CITIES: Venice=Venezia
Turin=Torino
Mantua= Mantova
Padua=Padova
Bozen=Bolzano
Leghorn=Livorno
Syracuse=Siracusa

ITALIAN PHYSICAL ELEMENTS (mountains, seas, rivers, valleys...):
Alpes=Alpi
Apennines= Appennini
Mont Blanc=Monte Bianco
Mt. Vesuvius= Vesuvio
Mt. Etna=Etna
Tiber=Tevere
Po Valley= Pianura Padana
Amalfi Coast=Costiera Amalfitana
Adriatic Sea= Mar Adriatico
Mediterranean Sea=Mar Mediterraneo
Thyrrenian Sea=Mar Tirreno
Ionian Sea= Mar Ionio (you can find also the spelling Jonio, but the sound of semivocalic i is the same)

OTHER CITIES OF THE WORLD:

Europa

Isole Britanniche
London=Londra Edinburgh=Edimburgo
Dublin=Dublino

Francia+Penisola Iberica
Paris=Parigi
Marseille=Marsiglia
Lyon=Lione
Toulouse=Tolosa
Nice=Nizza
Menton=Mentone
Toulon=Tolone
Barcelona=Barcellona
Seville=Siviglia
Cadiz=Cadice
Coruña=La Coruña
Lisbon=Lisbona

Germania
Berlin=Berlino
Hamburg=Amburgo
Munich=Monaco di Baviera
Stuttgart=Stoccarda
Nurenberg=Norimberga
Bremen=Brema
Leipzig=Lipsia
Dresden=Dresda
Frankfurt am Mein=Francoforte sul Meno (the part "sul Meno" is as optional as it is in English)
Cologne=Colonia
Lübeck=Lubecca
Augsburg=Augusta
Trier=Treviri
Magdeburg=Magdeburgo
Aachen=Aquisgrana
Mainz=Magonza
Regensburg=Ratisbona
Ulm=Ulma
Marburg=Marburgo
Freiburg=Friburgo
Passau=Passavia (the first a is stressed)
Konstantz=Costanza

Austria e Svizzera (Switzerland)
Wien=Vienna
Salzburg=Salisburgo
Villach=Villaco
Geneva=Ginevra
Lausanne=Losanna
Bern=Berna
Zurich=Zurigo
Luzern=Lucerna
Basel=Basilea
Sankt Gall=San Gallo
Schaffhausen=Sciaffusa

Benelux
The Hague=L'Aia
Antwerp=Anversa
Gent=Gand
Lieges=Liegi
Luxembourg=Lussemburgo
Bruxelles=Bruxelles (Brussells is less used)
the Flenders=le Fiandre
Wallonia=Vallonia

Scandinavia
Stockholm=Stoccolma

Russia
Moscow=Mosca
Saint Petersburg=San Pietroburgo

Ex-Iugoslavia, Albania, Bulgaria, Romania e Ungheria
Lublijana=Lubiana
Koper=Capodistria (literally head of Istria)
Postojna=Postumia
Maribor=Marburgo (yes, same name as the German city)
Zagreb=Zagabria
Zadar=Zara
Split=Spalato
Sibenik=Sebenico
Dubrovnik=Ragusa (yes, there is another Sicilian city with the same name)
Rijeka=Fiume
Pula=Pola
Belgrade=Belgrado
Sarajevo=Sarajevo
Bucharest=Bucarest
Durres=Durazzo
Szeged=Seghedino

Grecia
Athens=Atene
Thessaloniki=Salonicco
Patra=Patrasso
Corfu=Corfù
Rhodes=Rodi
Zakynthos=Zacinto (or Zante)
Ithaca=Itaca
Lesbos=Lesbo
Euboea=Eubea

I included the islands too as they are quite central in Greece's political geography despite them being a physical feature and are well well known among Europe.

Ex-Cecoslovacchia (Former Czecoslovakia) e Polonia (Poland):
Prague=Praga
Bratislava=Bratislava
Brno=Brno
Warsaw=Varsavia
Gdansk/Danzig=Danzica
Wroclaw/Breslau=Breslavia (the first a is stressed)
Krakow=Cracovia (the o is stressed)
Stettin=Stettino
Lublin=Lublino

Ucraina, Bielorussia e Paesi baltici (Baltic countries)
Kyev=Kiev
L'viv=Leopoli (stress on the first o)
Sevastopol=Sebastopoli (same as Lviv)
Odesa=Odessa

Asia

Medio Oriente (Middle East)
Damascus=Damasco
Jerusalem=Gerusalemme (stress on the first e)
Tel Aviv=Tel Aviv
Jaffa=Giaffa
Bethlehem=Betlemme
Riyadh=Riad
Mecca=La Mecca
Medina=Medina
Jeddah=Gedda
Baghdad=Bagdad/Baghdad

Asia Centrale e Afghanistan:
City names are not translated except for
Samarkand=Samarcanda

Asia meridionale (Southern Asia)
New Delhi=Nuova Delhi
Kolkata=Calcutta
Kathmandu=Katmandu (the last vowel is stressed)
Dakha=Dacca

Sud-Est Asiatico, Indonesia e Filippine (Philippines)
Basically every city bears the same name it has in English, except for Jakarta=Giacarta

Cina, Penisola Coreana e Giappone
Beijing=Pechino
Tokyo=Tokyo, but sometimes you can find also Tokio (same pronounciation though)
Tianjin=Tientsin
Nanjing=Nanchino
Guangzhou=Canton
Seoul=Seul
Pyongyang=Pyongyang (yes, believe it or not we didn't change it and I think it contains weird and difficult sounds for Italians)

Oceania

Australia, Nuova Zelanda e resto dell'Oceania
Every city bears exactly the same name it has in English.

Le Americhe

Stati Uniti d'America (United States of America, USA is used as well) e Canada:
Exactly the same name. States, provinces and territories as well. Some physical elements don't: Rocky Mountains=Montagne Rocciose,
St. Lawrence=San Lorenzo.

Messico e America Centrale (con i Caraibi)
Mexico City=Città del Messico
Guatemala City=Città del Guatemala
Havana=L'Avana
Puerto Rico=Porto Rico (I know it's a US territory, but it still is in the Carribbean)

America meridionale
São Paulo=San Paolo
Santiago de Chile= Santiago del Cile ("del Cile" is often dropped for shortness)

Africa
I will not divide the cities of this continent by area simply because the majority of name-changing cities are located in North Africa (Nord Africa o Africa Settentrionale):
Tangiers=Tangeri
Oran=Orano
Algiers=Algeri
Tunis=Tunisi
Carthage=Cartagine
Bizerte=Biserta
Suse=Susa
Tripoli=Tripoli
Benghazi=Bengasi
Alexandria=Alessandria d'Egitto ("d'Egitto" is kept because there is another city in Piedmont which bears the same name, even if it's far far smaller and less relevant (Alessandrini non me ne vogliate))
Cairo=Il Cairo
Memphis=Menfi (only the Egyptian city is translated, non the American one)
Aswan=Assuan
Port Said=Porto Said
Sharm-el-Sheikh doesn't change despite its spelling.

The only city south of the Sahara which changes its name is Cape Town, which becomes Città del Capo.

Ok, this list ends here. Don't absolutely learn it by heart, you'd forget these hundred and more (didn't count tbh) after a week. Memorize the Italian ones, the biggest European cities and a bunch of names from your area. I typed it just to satisfy your curiosity. Few of you will ever use Città del Guatemala, Samarcanda or Orano in a conversation in Italian (the majority of my fellow Italians don't even know their existence). Regarding the names I suggested to learn, keep practising and reading and these names will slowly get fixed in your brain, trust me. This is how I did with English. Also, given your pre-existing knowledge of English, the little differences (a letter or two changing) will never ever bother you. Take it easy guys!

P.S.: for the ones getting puzzled by the quantity and weirdness of translated names of German cities, I feel you. Never understood why our ancestors had so much fun with so much German cities, historical and economical reasons probably. Anyways, I love the way they sound. Too strange, ain't they?

Stay safe!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JillianPeraccini

You are awesome!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Madinamahf1

Grazie per l'aiuto.I loved to know new things. My city is called Dacca in Italian language


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lorendani

Never been to Bangladesh, but I'm sure it is a great country. Best wishes from Bologna!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/verna120098

Yes, you in the Italian peninsula had the word Germania, Tacitus or someone wrote the book. Where in sam hill did you get Tedesco for the language? Pondering.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Redcoat12

Teodesci was an old term for Germanic people, I think. I have the vague notion that was the name some German tribes used for themselves but I'm too lazy to check rn.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lorendani

It was a Latin adaption of the name of Proto Germanic in this language, theodisk, coming from theod, the people. It was opposed to the high classes who knew Latin. The German deutsch (and tysk and other similar Germanic words) come from the Old High German diutisc. Meaning both diutisc and theodisk language of the people, it is one of those rare occasions in which we can say that Italian and Germanic languages share something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClarkV2

"Andiamo ad Manila." Is that correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lorendani

No. Manila begins with a consonant, so you don't need the -d. In fact, this -d is added to make pronunciation easier. Theoretically, you should add the -d only when the following vowel is the same (ad ascoltare but not ad iniziare.
Practically, instead, native speakers add this -d whenever the following word starts with a vowel. Here are some examples of common use.
Vado ad Amsterdam, Vado ad Edimburgo, Vado ad Otranto: all vowels.
With consonants: Vado a Roma, Vado a Manila.
Vado a Berlino.

The euphonic d (d eufonica in Italian) appears with the linker e (and) as well. See:
Verrò con Mario ed Edoardo.
I'll come with Mario and Edoardo.
Same grammatical rules and same violations of them in the daily use.

You may also encounter od (or+euphonic d), but it's really rare and nobody uses it orally, so nevermind.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Umene

Thank you. Currently in italy and loving how I can communicate with the little I know and actually be understood. :) beautiful feeling


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kai_strings

Hey, do any of the local Italians speak a little English? Ive been wanting to go there (even though im a kid and wont be able to afford it anytime soon) and was curious if you got a handful of English speakers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linden.tree

I think it depends where you go. People who work in the tourism industry (like hotels, restaurants) are likely to know English, but even in big cities not everyone will (I had to go to a luggage shop in central Rome where the saleswoman spoke no English). I've been to Venice a few times and loads of people in shops there speak some English.

But mostly I've found Italians to be very polite and friendly, and like to converse. They seem to like it if you know at least a few words of their language. So just be polite and respectful and you'll get on just fine, even if there is a language barrier!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lorendani

We have quite an accent, people do not know it like in Northern Europe but you always get to communicate. Anyway, in touristic places such as Rome, Florence and Venice (the three cities everybody thinks Italy is only made of unluckily) and in other big cities (I suggest you to visit them and not to follow the stereotypical American dream from stupid rom coms set in Italy in a countryside house which seems to be completely abandoned in the charming hills of Tuscany where, weirdly, nobody lives but an incredibly handsome young Mediterranean man who should reoresent the average Italian farmer) you should have no difficulties at all. P.S.: don't mind the brackets, just I'm not a normal, mentally sane person


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Italiammo

I know! It's so awesome!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/theo3ling

You are right Kenny! I am from Amsterdam, and I can asure you it is not the center of the universe


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lauritz14

its the center of something else


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LoicCoenen

Ask a parisian and paris will be the center of the universe


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/veronica416036

Also ask Belgradian/Serbia :-p


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LlamaNation01

Lol, I got marked down for spelling Amsterdam wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArthurKirk13

Wow i hate when that happens ill accidentally misspell somethjng and then auto correct will correct me and then i will get it wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/verna120098

Amster amster shush shush shush. We mustn't say that naughty word! (Camp song of childhood)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zeynep-cakircali

Why is it not "we go to amsterdam" but "we are going to amsterdam"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KwanpoChen

I would like to know as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drooboo

my thought is for clarity, seeing how there is a difference between the present simple we go and continuous we are going.

We use the present simple tense when we want to talk about fixed habits or routines – things that don’t change.

We use the present continuous to talk about actions which are happening at the present moment, but will soon finish.

read here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theo639847

I think that Let's go (to Amsterdam) is also a good translation of Andiamo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cadenciorum402

When would you use ad instead of all'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mukkapazza

a/ad = ad is used instead of a when the following word starts with a vowel, specifically an a-. You can try pronouncing some of these combination when you come across them to figure out whether you want to use one or the other. You'll note that your choice depends entirely on whether or not you stumble over certain letters.

a/a + article = the article isn't used in front of an unmodified city (kind of like the family member rule!) but you will find it in front of the names of some countries, rivers, mountains... it gets a bit complicated ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teveril

It makes sense as a conjugated verb to me (andiamo=we go), but growing up my grandparents would always say "andiamo!" to mean "let's go!" I put "let's go to Amsterdam," and it was marked correct. I'm just curious about how the word means both things? In English, "lets go" (suggestion or command) is very different from "we go" (statement).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lorendani

It's all about the intonation and the stress. It happens with questions too actually, in English you change the whole sentence while in Italian we recycle the normal form and just modify our voice. You can't imagine the effort when I had to learn it and keep in mind that hateful "to do" verb. It is still tricky to me sometimes ugh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thomasleft

Isn't "andiamo" "let's go"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArazBenn

Yes. it also can be used as "let's go"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gene10111

I wrote "let's go to the Amsterdam". They say it is wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaiusSolitaire

I think it's because of a redundant "the".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim900856

Why not "we go to amsterdam"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatalinaIo

No, andiamo a Roma, use ad only if the word starts with a vowel. Andiamo ad Ancona :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArazBenn

Worng. It's, Andiamo a Roma.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/verna120098

well, the Romans did.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/S_Birjandi

I got marked down for typing lets instead of let's


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theo639847

Like people from amsterdam never would visit their own town, Amsterdam is for Italians more interesting than towns they already know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoseRazia

Wow! It would be fin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aculady

I listened to this several times and couldn't understand "Amsterdam'. I wrote 'adsedum'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/myriamf7

andiamo also means "let's go" so how will i know when it means let's go OR we are going?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lorendani

Context is the key


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KariTJ

Andiamo per Amsterdam, is it wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martin212200

It's wrong cuz per=for So: Andiamo per Amsterdam=We are going for Amsterdam.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DietmarH.A

pronunciation of "ad" before Amsterdam is not understandable as ad. Not the first time that speakers don't pronounce well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heather879054

My answer is correct and it won't accept it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AudreyLem0n

Hi, why is it 'ad' and not 'a' Amsterdam? Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lorendani

Basically because it sounds better and it is easier to say the d instead of just stopping the flow. It is the euphonic "a". It applies to the linkers "e" (and) and "o" (or) too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneWalsh13

Why do I sometimes get told I have a typing error but other times a simple thing that is obviously a typing error is marked wrong - I put an extra E in Amsterdam?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carol638842

Why ad instead of all'Amsterdam?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/allgoodjuju

thanks for the help

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