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"Quiero que seas mi maestro."

Translation:I want you to be my teacher.

5 years ago

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/arturohiero

Why would you be using the familiar form with someone who is (to be) one's teacher. Should be formal "sea".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Well, it could be your brother or your uncle. If I tell my sister: I want you to be my English teacher, I would not start calling her "usted" just because she is going to teach me something.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatnarineF

Sounds like something you'd say to someone intimate to me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackFaller

sea could be 1st person, in which case yo sea would imply something intimate indeed

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/likethree

Viktor, quiero que seas mi entrenador.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeroyDing
LeeroyDing
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Why not "I want you to be my master"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SbertoliLanguage

I agree, that should be accepted as a valid interpretation. "Profesor" is just as frequently used as "maestro", or more, and "maestro" also means "master".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Except "master" in this sentence is pretty kinky. Think of the movie "50 Shades of Grey." I suggest that the translation (master) would be a mistake, unless you have a "Grey" context.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

Unless you want to be someone's Sith apprentice, and then the sentence makes perfect sense in a "Star Wars" context. The familiar verb can be explained simply by watching the not-all-there look Anakin Skywalker's face in Revenge of the Sith when he pledges himself to Sidious.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

The look ON his face.

¡Lo siento!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeroyDing
LeeroyDing
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There are more than a few sentences in Duolingo that only make sense under certain context though...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Many English speakers don't understand the subjunctive. Also, this DL translation is in the indicative mood, not the subjunctive, whereas the Spanish is subjunctive. -- therefore, one might say that it is mis-translated.

The English subjunctive would be: "I want that you be my teacher." (the subjunctive uses the "root word" of the infinitive. Examples of "root words" are "to BE", "to RUN" (I want that you run..." "to BEGIN" (I want that you begin..." [this is for present tense subjunctive. Also, an exception is "were" (}if I were here..."] ["Were" is the subjunctive of "are"]

Here is a copy from this website:https://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/grammar_subjunctive.html

"3. Finally, the subjunctive can also appear in restrictive clauses after phrases like I wish that, I hope that, I desire that, or I suggest that, when the speaker wishes to emphasize the tentative, contingent, suppositional, or unreal nature of that wish, hope, or suggestion.

Subjunctive: "I suggest that John arrive on Tuesdays this month."

<pre> The day for the weekly arrival is a mere suggestion, a hypothetical idea that John might or might not follow. The statement does not necessarily mean he will arrive at that time each week. Thus it is subjunctive, not indicative. </pre>

Indicative: "I believe that the train arrives on Tuesdays during this month."

<pre> The indicative states a fact the speaker believes is true. The train indeed arrives on Tuesdays each week of this month. </pre>

Subjunctive: "She wishes that Americans in the South were more formal today."

<pre> The subjunctive indicates that, in fact, Americans are not formal today. The wish states a desire for an unreal state that does not reflect the current situation. </pre>

Indicative: "She thinks that Americans in the South are more formal than most Americans today." "

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iyphd
iyphd
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Thanks for the great explanation. For some reason Duo says I'm wrong whenever I translate "Quiero que..." to "I want that...", and says the correct translation is either "I wish that..." or "I want..." It's really frustrating.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galletadecolores
galletadecolores
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Why not use the future form seràs.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wikadi

Because the future form of subjunctive does not exist, you have to use the present form of subjunctive to espress also about the future.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galletadecolores
galletadecolores
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So is there past subjunctive, too?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wikadi

Yes, the form is -ra, like hablara, comera and subira without accent.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galletadecolores
galletadecolores
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Alright! More verb conjugations to learn :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

i thought "be/to be" was an imperative and that the affirmative imperative was "se" and the negative imperative was "no seas" so not sure why this sentence is not "quiero que se..."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

What's actually weird here is the way that English constructs sentences like this.

Consider: "I want you to run." The "object" of want, here, is a complete phrase, with its own subject and verb. It's comparable to: I wish that you would run. Expressions with "would" or "should" are a common way in English to express ideas similar to Spanish's subjunctive. You can also have simpler inflected forms inside an "object" clause of this type. I see that he runs. I watch you run.

The real mystery, despite how natural it seems to us as native speakers, is this: Why did English "want" develop this form where the verb in the secondary clause converts back to its infinitive form, even though it has a local subject. Why isn't it, "I want that[1] you would[2] run." Where [1] could be some other joining word besides "that", or nothing, and [2] could be some other modifier like "should", or nothing.

Spanish's subjunctive is, if you survey a bunch of languages, much more natural / normative / logical. English's way of expressing this idea is freaking weird.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wikadi

In this sentence you have to use 'seas', because when the sentence states one's 'hope', and the subjects of dependent clause and independent clause are not same, the verb of dependent clause should be written in subjunctive. It's because the dependent clause's content is not a real situation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

ok thanks. pretty complicated but......it is what it is.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolyT
HolyT
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The imperative mood is never used in a subordinate clause in English or Spanish. It just may confuse you that the forms are similar in both Spanish and English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/undinenstaub
undinenstaub
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I understand that it can be "i would like you to be my teacher" or "i want you to be...", but it is not english to say "i want that you be..." why is DL correcting my "i want that you are..." in that way then? I think you don't need subj.in english, so my sentence should be counted as well, shouldn't it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidStyIes
DavidStyIesPlus
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"I want that you be..." is unusual English, but perfectly correct. "I want that you are...", on the other hand, is both unusual and incorrect.

Due to modern usage, it's become acceptable to be quite lax with the use of the subjunctive in English (ie, the indicative will pass for it in most contexts), but this isn't one of them, not the way you're trying to do it anyway.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

I agree. "I want that you be" is perfectly correctly English subjunctive.

'I want that you are..." is NOT good English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casiquire

I had read elsewhere that the imperative is very informal and is usually considered a bit too direct and rude. Does that apply to this sentence too? The reading I did suggested turning things into questions instead of using imperative.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmat10
jmat10
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This sentence makes me think of how a young child might say this to a teacher, and it makes me wonder if a young spanish speaking child would get this wrong and say, "Quiero que tú ser mi maestro." And then he would have to be corrected by the teacher to use the correct verb tense. I'm just wondering if it happens a lot.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidStyIes
DavidStyIesPlus
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I think it'd be unusual for a Spanish-speaking child to make a typically English-language mistake.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Victoria28872

I am confused by the conjugate listing which shows an r "seras" I don't see seas anywhere on the conjugated list of future tense... should it not be Quiero que seras mi maestro?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonathayDongle

Why isn't 'I want you to be my teacher' translate to 'yo quiero que tu ser mi maestro' or something like that? What is seas?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/norma488180

I said"I want you to be my teacher" and it was counted wrong with the Duo answer of "I want for you to be my teacher." Help! PLEASE.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/norma488180

2nd time through Duo accepted my answer!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yael8376

Why not" I want that you will be my teacher"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dusty286131

Dont understand why que is in there

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaSpiroXhardo
LindaSpiroXhardo
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It will be my pleasure!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mangaiyark3

"I want YOU to be my teacher". Could anyone tell me ,which word denotes you in the sentence.__ Quiero que seas mi maestro

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Victoria906169

The "seas" denotes "you," but I am also confused about this sentence construction, as per my question below.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Victoria906169

Why is the object pronoun not used here, i.e., why isn't it "Te quiero que seas mi maestro?"

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DenisLever

Should be "sé" if this is the verb' "ser"

6 months ago