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"You can be a teacher."

Translation:Tú puedes ser un maestro.

5 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Fabian227203

"Estar" is uses to indicate a temporary attribute like an emotion, location and condition, whereas the more permanent "ser" is used to indicate character, identity and description (like a job)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jocelyn-H
Jocelyn-H
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Why didn't it work when I said "maestra instead of maestro"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DiaLaSh

Why ser not estar

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jgarner0

ser is used for jobs/occupations. i don't know why-possibly because jobs are thought of as more permanent?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jnowley
jnowley
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Why do i have to use "tu"? Why not just puedes ser una maestra?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I would like to know what the rule is here. Is 'be' in this context always the infinitive 'ser'?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/run4fun33

The literal translation of poder is "to be able to", so it translates to you are able to be a teacher. The "to be" is why ser is in the infinitive.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/--shaun--

A way you might find easier to remember is that when you have 2 or 3 consecutive verbs, the 2nd and 3rd verbs are always in their infinitive form. e.g. I want to see the swimming pool (Quiero ver la piscina) - here the 2nd verb is 'ver' so it is in its infinitive form. e.g. Do you want to go see the movie? (¿Quieres ir a ver la película?) - here the 2nd and 3rd verbs ('ir' and 'ver') are in their infinitive forms.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bsimmo14
bsimmo14
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If in english you would say "to" before the verb then you most likely use the infinitive. I want TO SEE the dog/ quiero VER el perro. Ver=to see

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluthbanana87

Has there been any indications of a shift to using 'estar' over 'ser' when talking about people's jobs? Nowadays, people, especially younger people, are less likely to have careers and more like to hold positions that last for a couple years before moving on. If the situation is right (or wrong, depending on your point of view), you might even see frequent changes in the field or industry, too.

I wonder if that's enough to cause a huge linguistic shift.

1 year ago