"As suas palavras são boas."

Translation:Your words are good.

5 years ago

54 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
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Interesting:

Suas is not only for "você", but for the third person as well ("ele, ela").

So this sentence can also mean, when talking about another person, "his/her words are good"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmapurunga
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I am a native speaker so I can assure you that you are right. When you try to make yourself clear which person you are using you must say "tuas palavras" for the second person "você/tu" or "as palavras dele/dela/deles/delas" for the third person masculine singular (ele) / feminine singular (ela) / masculine plural (eles) / feminine plural (elas).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sarah94x3

Such a good explanation

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NatalyaJoly

It's similar in French

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/r_i_l_e_y

"their words" also

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sambadojazz

I tried "their words". Wrong answer, according to duolingo. I think it was correct.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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Quoting from J. Whitlam's Modern Brazilian Portuguese Grammar:

In the written language "seu(s), sua(s)" is regularly used to mean: his, her, its, or theirs, usually without the definite article before it. It is only used in this meaning when there is no possible ambiguity to whom it refers. In speech (and in the spoken media) , seu(s), sua(s) is always understood to mean your. "

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
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I would be careful of "only" and "always", but those are good advices.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
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Não conheço o livro =\

Mas é present perfect mesmo :p

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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It's a direct quote from Whitlam's highly-regarded "gramática" - he's the author of several English-Portuguese dictionaries.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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report it

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElenaIoan

google translate sais is correct

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mesmorino
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It's wrong. "Seu(s)/Sua(s)" = His, Her or Your.

In the sentence above the "Sua" is plural because "palavras" is plural, it's not to indicate more than one person's words.

"Their" = "deles/delas", so "Their words are good" = "As palavras deles (or delas) sao boas"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eey91
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This also happens in Spanish btw.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reno300

wouldn't 'his words are good' be 'seus palavras são boas' instead of 'suas'?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
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Nope. The pronoun declines acording to the noun they point to. In this case "as palavras".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BayranArrieta
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Can I said only - suas palavras são boas-?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmapurunga
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Yes you can

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmapurunga
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Yes, it is better to use "as"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BayranArrieta
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But, it is informal?, is better to use -as-?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Somatic

why does 'as' need to qualify 'suas'. Can one write just start the sentence with 'suas' ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/r_i_l_e_y

yes

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gautamamehta

Can someone explain the difference? When do you use the article in addition to the possessive?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmapurunga
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There is no difference. People speak with or without the article

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregIhnen

Doesn't the meaning change slightly with the pronoun? Without the pronoun isn't the sentiment more "your words", and with the pronoun isn't the meaning a bit more "those words of yours"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mesmorino
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Do you mean "as"? Because that's an article, not a pronoun. In any case, "Those words of yours" and "your words" are completely synonymous.

I think the meaning does change slightly, but not in the way you think: It helps to determine if you mean "your words" or "his/her" words.

I haven't figured out which is which (whether "as suas" tends to indicate "your" or "his/her"), but I'm not too concerned about it- Native speakers speak with or without the article, and presumably use context to derive meaning

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alfabladet

My first thought was giving credit to the slow sound but the last word was indestinguashible. I finally guessed boas but then got wrong anyways for a single typo in suos/suas =(

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrunAnimas
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That does NOT sound like "boas"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mesmorino
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The Duo robot mispronounces a lot of words, and even worse merges/mushes/contracts a lot of the prepositions and articles. And this is even before getting to homophones like "Há" and "a". To this day I still cannot hear the difference between "Há uma diferenca" and "a uma diferenca".

I just go by context and cross my fingers :p (and use the slow speaker if I think it doesn't sound right)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SerenataAruanda

Could this also be translated to english as "you speak well"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Coayuco
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To say that someone's word are good is to say that they have a positive impact, e.g., they help people feel better, they inspire them to action, etc. Speaking well refers to presentation, e.g.,eloquence, presentation, delivery, etc. Many people speak well and their words are meaningless.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mesmorino
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I would say yes, but that could be written as "voce fala boa". "Your words are good" could be something you say to a writer, like an author or a journalist, as an assessment of, well, their words. Maybe a speechwriter as well, or a public speaker

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmapurunga
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The translation for "you speak well" is "você fala bem" but mesmorino is right in the other aspects.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexandraparisi

Why can't someone say "Voce palavras sao boas"? I know this is a really stupid question, sorry.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mesmorino
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Voce = You

Seu/Sua = Your, singlular

Seus/Suas = Your, plural.

So, "Your book" = Seu livro

And "Your books" = Seus livros

Similarly, "Your words" = Suas palavras

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexandraparisi

Thanks for the help. So why is something like "I love you" "Eu te amo", and not "Eu voce amo", or something similar? It confuses me a bit.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mesmorino
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I think it's a specific phrase, like " a si mesmo".

I'm not a native Portuguese speaker, so if I was to translate "I love you", I would write " Eu amo voce" but that's either awkward, or just plain wrong lol (I haven't figured out which). So, now I say "Eu te amo"

But hey I'm learning here too :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paddyobrien
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If you're saying that to someone you're probably on informal terms by that stage!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Coayuco
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If Portuguese works the same as Spanish in this case (verb conjugation generally does) this is a form that does not exist in English. The following examples are in Spanish because I'm not sufficiently fluent in Portuguese, but I hope it helps

You use "te" when the action of the verb is directed to the person being addressed. Yo te amo = I love you. Tú te amas = You love yourself. Él/ella te ama = He/She loves you. Nosotros te amamos = We love you. Ellos/Ellas te aman = They love you.

If the action is directed towards the speaker, you would use "me". Yo me amo = I love myself, Tú me amas = You love me. And so forth.

If the action is directed to a third person, you would use "Le" or "La. Yo le/la amo = I love him/her. And so forth.

If you are speaking of a third person directing some action to him/her/themselves you use "se". Él/Ella se ama = He/She loves him/herself.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chrstnzt

"Suas palavras". Why use suas instead of seus? Is it because 'palavras' is a feminine word?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mesmorino
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Yes. "seus livros", "suas palavras"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BearlyCat
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I've not seen anything (in Duo) that explains why we need to use "as" in front of "suas" sometimes. Can someone explain that to me?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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It's correct Portuguese, but many Brazilians don't use it in daily speech.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
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In fact its absolutely optional, both in formal and informal texts.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rose.fala

Why is there a definite article in front of the possesive adjective?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mesmorino
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It's a quirk of Portuguese (and some other romance languages). Native Portuguese speakers omit it in formal and informal written and spoken speech, but Duo tends to include it most of the time.

It won't mark you wrong for including it, but it may mark you wrong for leaving it out.

And it's not just in front of adjectives, the definite article can be found in front of nouns too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peterjoel58

It is a sentence that I have never uttered in English. Is it meant to mean "you speak well"? Or "I like what you are saying"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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Maybe "What you have said sounds good".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peterjoel58

I would more likely say "that sounds good".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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"That sounds good" seems more informal imo. It'd be something like "Parece bom/legal" in Portuguese... =)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peterjoel58

I think that is the crux of the problem - what is the right level of formality? "Your words are good" sounds like something Mr Spock from Star Trek would say. Even "What you have said sounds good" sounds stilted to me. Maybe "that sounds good" is too informal. But, there are even more informal idiomatic expressions - "I hear you", "word", etc.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mesmorino
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You're trying to ascribe meaning to it, when there really isn't (at least not without context). It's just a sentence that's grammatically correct, it's not a way to say "you speak well", or "I like what you're saying".

As for using it, well it's something you might say to someone as an assessment of their words- such as an author, a speechwriter, or other people who regularly use words.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2dghi6
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Difference between bom and boa?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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Bom = masculine

Boa = feminine

1 year ago
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