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"The boy is weak."

Translation:El niño está débil.

5 years ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

Both "El niño es débil" and "El niño está débil" are correct translations, but it should be noted that the two sentences have different meanings. The first, using ser, suggests a personal characteristic, while the second, using estar, suggests a temporary condition.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa.a.col

Thanks. 20-plus lessons later and I still get confused :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/covinm
covinm
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You are not alone my friend.. I do too!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

Just to clarify.

My understanding is that, in order for "es débil" to be correct, you would have to be referring to someone with a weak character, such as someone who is unable to stand up for himself.

If someone is weak because of an illness, that would be "está debil".

That would seem to agree with this link here:
https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/ser-vs-estar

Which would you use If someone is not able lift heavy objects?
In my mind one could make an argument for it being both a character trait and a condition?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itay_bi
itay_bi
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Thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sharonm6680

Thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AntimaChat1

Thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KatherineMaas
KatherineMaas
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I totally get this distinction. On my first try, however, when I wrote El niño es débil, it was marked wrong. This should be fixed.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bashetunmaj

"debil" means stupid in russian and some other languages

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cocio_16
Cocio_16
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"débile" in french, for exemple, had originally the same meaning has the spanish "débil". Then, it began to be used for "débile mental" ("mentally weak"), which is an other way to say "mentally retarded". It was not an insult, just a way to describe a condition.

Time have passed. Now every french speaking person understand "débile" as "stupid". And that's an insult.

That's probably the same for russian, polish, czech and others. I'm so sure of it that I have not took the time to check for it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tpnSteveRo
tpnSteveRo
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In czech it means stupid too. I think this applies for most of slavic languages :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/radek_1985

Yes, in Polish too. But the recording is wrong here. The stress should fall in the first syllable, not the second.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ToniVeinticinco

There are many instances where the computerized voices mispronounce words. When they mispronounce words with accent marks, it's painfully obvious.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChaseLouie1

Cool

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eugenio-Ruisenor

To Mr Shostakovich: This meaning probably entered Russian via French. But the original protoeuropean meaning was "anti-big", "de-strong" - de-bolshoy as in proto-Slavic ból'šij

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JJ_Eldumo

In Serbia, we would use it to point to something a little bit stronger - it is similar to "idiot". Quite negative conotation

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jarppis44

Whaat? In our language (Finnish) debil would mean slightly retarded!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chromechisel

"El niño es(tá) flojo" should also work

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carole_Hubbard

Yes. You should report it, thanks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sharonm6680

Why esta and not es?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carole_Hubbard

See comment by Fluent2B above for explanation (1st comment listed).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nina40670

Why does it sound like débil has the accent over the second syllable (dé BIL), when it clearly has an accent mark over the first? Or is it just a weird recording?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ToniVeinticinco

It's a fairly common duo thing.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RSvanKeure
RSvanKeure
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I wonder why DL uses "niño" all the time instead of "muchacho"? When I learned Spanish in grade school, they taught us that "muchacho" is 'boy', and "niño" is 'little boy' or even 'baby'. Just curious.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ByronShirah

Fun related, colloquial words: "el alfeñique" (weakling) and "el renacuajo" (shrimp [small boy]).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glexey
glexey
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Why is 'el niño está flaco' incorrect?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Because flaco is skinny, and being skinny doesn't mean you're weak.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Could he be confused with flojo?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alibax
alibax
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Why were "femino" and "femininas" options for 'weak?' Wtf duo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tinkerbell927108

I thought the accent over the e in él was "he" and without it was "the". So, why was it considered wrong here?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mammad99
mammad99
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A previous sentence "Ella es una mujer débil = she is a weak woman" also uses the same spelling for débil in a feminine form. As an adjective shouldn't it be different?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Onyx.Rose
Onyx.Rose
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"Débil" is similar to the English word "debilitated," meaning "weakened" or "infirmed."

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boris145074

Its funny beacause in my native language (slovak) debil is a medical condicion but it is commonly used as an insult, pretty much like retard in english :D

11 months ago