"Élestabamuyelevado."

Translation:He was very elevated.

5 years ago

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jjpo151
jjpo151
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yeah! in spanish we don't say elevado for high by drugs, we say drogado

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dnnyprry

(Mexican slang)

andar pacheco: to be high

"Él andaba bien pacheco."

He was very high.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vandermonde

We'd probably say "high" for both, but you can clarify physical location as "high up." It's pretty rare to say "elevated" as an adjective like this outside of a few phrases.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TerryMacki1

DL just accepted "He was very high.", which in American English would always mean "He was stoned." unless there was some contrary context. And if it was meant in some other way, it would probably be said some other way.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/the-octagon

That doesn't mean that both definitions translate. High has many meanings in English, but this one only applies to elevation in Spanish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jairapetyan
jairapetyan
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I don't understand why people voted this down. Another user made a similar observation below and it has upvotes. Anyway, Terry's got a good point. Without more context, what comes to mind was that he must have been under the influence of drugs, and that is said differently in Spanish.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shemp
shemp
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Just a question for a native speaker, please explain what context this sentence would be used in. A physical state or a mental state?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JaviTR

A physical state, like being on the top of a mountain or so ;)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raftus
Raftus
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Yeah, except you'd never say that. It's a strangely computery phrase.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheSnark
TheSnark
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Agreed. It is not a naturally spoken sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

In areas like the midwest the sentence likely never gets said but in the chuck full of mountains states it does get said.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/c0mp0stela

He was very elevated by a elevator.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dberthold

The online Spanish Dictionary, which I keep open to check on translations like this, gives both physical and personal meanings of elevado: He was tall, he was noble, he was sophisticated, in that order. Without context, you can't tell how to translate this, a common issue in DL.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santiago448939

We almost never use this sentence... We say something like "Estamos muy alto"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/c0mp0stela

Jesus Christ was elevated to heaven?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boss-of-Pigs
Boss-of-Pigs
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He was very high is a perfectly sensible sentence outside of drug use. "Hey, Bob was climbing a ladder yesterday and he fell" How high was he? "he was very high"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/38298apo392

Very elevated as in someone's mood was very elevated? In English we joke about being elevated after altering our consciousness so I'm wondering if it can be used like that here as well.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/the-octagon

No. Altitude.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeniseIvan

Why is this imperfect? This is preterite in my mind. ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rockseed
Rockseed
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As I understand it, the use of Imperfect implies that the state of being elevated happened over an indefinite period of time. See https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/preterite-vs-imperfect-in-spanish. One of the uses it gives for the imperfect is for mental or physical states. If the sentence tacked on one of the preterite signal phrases listed it could be translated as preterite, but lacking that, imperfect is assumed.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oinophilos
Oinophilos
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It's not a matter of high rank or elevated status, then?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/the-octagon

On a mountain.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mstahr11

When would you use "Él fue muy elevado" rather than this?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/irene121212

He was very high.....Wow.....marked correct

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marguandre
marguandre
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I translated el as it as in el gato thinking the thing was up high. Is that totally wrong? it was marked wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/the-octagon

Si. Èl y el son distintos.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marguandre
marguandre
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I understand that the article el in el gato is not the same as El, but is it possible to use the pronoun El for a thing or only for a human?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/the-octagon

The difference is the accent. Èl/èl vs El/el. Yes, Èl can refer to a cat if used as a pronoun. "My cat is lazy. He sleeps all day." "Mi gato es perezoso. Él duerme todo el día."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marguandre
marguandre
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That's what I thought. I wasn't able to add the accent with my computer, but understand the difference. If the sentence "El duerme todo el dia" is correct then "El estaba muy elevado", can be translated at "It was very high." I should not have been marked wrong. Thank you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/the-octagon

No, they are not interchangeable. "He" is not the same as "it" or "the".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marguandre
marguandre
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I'll accept. El can be used for animals or objects but only if we bestow on them human characteristics.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarissaRai

Could elevated also refer to mood? As in manic? Or is it only physical elevation as when climbing a mountain?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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This Spanish sentence does not make sense

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BryceSpringfield
BryceSpringfield
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Could someone explain why this is imperfect instead of preterite?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rockseed
Rockseed
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As I understand it, the use of Imperfect implies that the state of being elevated happened over an indefinite period of time. See https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/preterite-vs-imperfect-in-spanish. One of the uses it gives for the imperfect is for mental or physical states. If it tacked on one of the preterite signal phrases listed it could be translated as preterite, but lacking that, imperfect is assumed.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankFox0

Because, of course.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pierre44369

wtf does that mean?

2 years ago
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