"Dezeleraarheeftvierklassen."

Translation:This teacher has four classes.

3 years ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/pollyliao
pollyliao
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Is there any difference between "les" and "klas"? Bedankt ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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"klas" in this sense is the group of students that the teacher is teaching "les" is what the students are being taught, e.g. Engelse les.

So to put it in a sentence: De klas heeft Engelse les.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wei-Da

Excuse me, I learned that klas can mean both grade and class. So how am I suppose to ask "which grade does that teacher teach"? Is it: "Welke klas leert dat leraar?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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Yes, klas can also mean grade. Your sentence I would translate as: Aan welke klas geeft die leraar les?.

  • To teach (by a teacher) would generally be translated as lesgeven
  • De words use die, so die leraar. Het words use dat, e.g. dat huis
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pollyliao
pollyliao
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Dank u wel! :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ernie18814

Hold the phone - two sentences back "klas" was translated to grade, now "klassen" is translated to classes instead of grades :S. Classes doesn't translate to grades in my head, because you can have four classes of the same grade. Very confusing

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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It's not about if the English words are interchangeable, it's about what the Dutch sentence can mean.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ernie18814

Mapping of the english word to the dutch word is kind of important in learning a language :). I do not understand how if a sentence in dutch says "klas" whether the speaker's intention was class or grade? In Afrikaans we have "klas" and "graad", so the distinction is easy

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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And in Dutch you could use klas to both refer to a class and a grade. Which one is appropriate depends on context.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bassi0902
bassi0902
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Can "leraar" be translated also with "lecturer" ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rekty
Rekty
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No, a teacher isn't always a lecturer.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnneAmanda

Would someone explain the difference between a teacher and a lecturer? We don't have that distinction in American education, though I have often read about it in British books. I can't imagine a teacher who doesn't lecture or a lecturer who doesn't teach.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnneAmanda

Unfortunately, that doesn't actually explain the difference within the British and/or Dutch school system. To me, as an American, "teacher" and "lecturer" are synonymous. A teacher lectures (among other things). A lecturer is teaching.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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Sure but not every teacher is a lecturer. E.g. a primary school teacher is not a lecturer. Also in the US.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Siobhan009
Siobhan009
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Hi, a teacher is the general word we use for a person teaching in a school (primary or secondary, ie for children from 4/5 years old to 10/11, and then 11 to 15/16) and we normally use the word lecturer for a person who teaches higher level studies. So a child would have a teacher but a young adult (16-18) at Sixth Form College doing A levels for example, would have a lecturer, and a University student would also have a lecturer. And (in the interests of completeness) a professor is usually the head of a university department, who will often teach too, ie give lectures. We also distinguish between "school" which is only for children, "college" which is usually a Sixth Form College or technical college (for young adults and/or adults) and university, which is where people do degrees. It's quite different to American usage, so I hope this is helpful. (I'm from England.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnneAmanda

Siobhan009, thank you! That is the sort of explanation I was hoping for. It makes loads of British books make much more sense to me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spanishlea27779

Does this does this lesson plan not have any places where I can speak and it listens to me?

1 week ago
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