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  5. "The strike may force us to s…

"The strike may force us to stay at home."

Translation:Strejken kan tvinga oss att stanna hemma.

February 8, 2015

45 Comments


[deactivated user]

    why shouldn't får be accepted here in the place of kan?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blehg

    Because får means either "is allowed to" (as in "You may do so") or "will have to" (as in "This will have to do"), and neither of those work in this context. In this phrase "may" indicates possibility and not permission, so we translate with kan.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gerda575830

    Far jag lana..... This is also a possibility so.....


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    That's covered by the "is allowed to" sense.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dan.ger

    How about "Strejken kanske tvinger oss ...."?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

    If so, it's tvingar.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dan.ger

    Det har du rätt i. Tack. :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SheilaMorris

    It still gets marked wrong...says it should be "kan" instead of "kanske"....


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

    Strejken kanske tvingar oss att stanna hemma is an accepted answer. I don't know what happened in your case or whether the sentence has been changed in the meantime, but report it if you don't get it accepted again. (via the Report a problem button)

    With kan, it would be: Strejken kan tvinga oss att stanna hemma so the verb tvingar changes too.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ConorDevine

    How about "strejken ska kanske tvinga oss..."?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

    Not good. When you say ska, there's always the sense that someone wants something to happen, or someone controls the action to get a certain outcome. So you could say that sentence, but then it would mean more like Maybe the strike is meant to make us … in English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PLLumsdaine

    What about Strejken kommer kanske att tvinga oss… ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

    That works. (in meaning it's closer to 'Maybe the strike will …' but then it's a bit difficult to say that in English if you want to have the strike first in the sentence).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jarrettph

    Perhaps this is an anglified habit but why doesn't kunde work?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ConorDevine

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but i think it's because 'kunde' is the past tense of the verb 'kunna', so you should use the present tense 'kan' instead...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jarrettph

    Perhaps. In English I would say could which I have always translated as kunde. I know you shouldn't translate word for word but I was just curious about this.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ConorDevine

    I know what you mean, and when I first moved to Sweden I used 'kunde' as 'could' in every tense (like in English) but my friends have since taught me to use 'kunde' for things that could have happened in the past, and 'kan' for things that could (or can) happen in the future.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jarrettph

    That actually makes sense when you put it that way. I guess yet another case where English is the odd one out. :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

    Isn't could more "skulle kunna"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

    I agree with you, I always translate this English could as skulle kunna. I think it's the closest option.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jarrettph

    That sounds like would be able to, but maybe. Could, would, and should are words I have struggled to translate a lot lol.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

    I have the opposite problem :).

    I am thinking of "I could have danced all night", which I would(?) translate to "Jag skulle kunna ha dansat hela natten".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VikingPunkology

    So, why is the response "Strejken maj tvinga oss att stanna hemma" incorrect here?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

    maj = May (the month)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VikingPunkology

    facepalm That makes complete sense, and I now see why it came up. Tack!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rockysfairat

    Why do we have to put ATT here, if KAN is the modal verb? I thought that modal verbs do not require ATT :/


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jarrettph

    Tvinga does not need att because of the modal verb, however stanna doesn't have a modal verb so it does require one. The modal verb doesn't affect every verb in the sentence!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClarkJensen21

    Is there a way to view the answers that are acceptable?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    Afraid not, but here's a list:

    • Strejken kan komma att tvinga oss att stanna hemma.
    • Strejken kan komma att tvinga oss att hålla oss hemma.
    • Strejken skulle kunna tvinga oss att stanna hemma.
    • Strejken skulle kunna tvinga oss att hålla oss hemma.
    • Strejken kan tvinga oss att stanna hemma.
    • Strejken kan tvinga oss att hålla oss hemma.
    • Strejken kommer kanske att tvinga oss att stanna hemma.
    • Strejken kommer kanske att tvinga oss att hålla oss hemma.
    • Strejken kanske tvingar oss att stanna hemma.
    • Strejken kanske tvingar oss att hålla oss hemma.
    • Strejken kan tvinga oss att stanna hemma.

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClarkJensen21

    Wow, Thanks for your efforts to answer. It is helpful to see the list.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey424760

    If kan is the actual solution why is it not included in the hints for the term "may"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/romogo1

    what about "må tvinga oss"? why not allowed?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    in the meaning of "may" is all but archaic in Swedish, save for in certain phrases. I would recommend not using it at all outside of such phrases.

    It also doesn't have this meaning of "may", since it expresses subjunctive mood.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronDandr

    I think that the use of "may" in this sentence is a little strange, I would have used "could", it seems more good, but I'm not a native English speaker, just the translation between English and Swedish seems (to me) slightly different


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    "could" is indeed accepted when translating into English. But if we put that as the default, it'll be used automatically for the reverse translation option, in which case it'd be better as skulle kunna.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SheilaMorris

    Nothing strange about it to a native English speaker. "May", "might", or "could" work fine in this sentence....although "may" wouldn't be my first choice here.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chrisbilljohn

    Hints only give får; kan is missing.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    Hints are set coursewide, so they don't necessarily apply to each individual sentence.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CTfalcoUSA

    Could this also mean a military strike?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    No, that's a räd, cognate with "raid". For instance, an airstrike is a flygräd. That's also a good example of the importance of long and short vowels in Swedish - if you use a short one instead, you get flygrädd, which means scared of flying.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagpieMaggie

    Why is it strejken since strejk is an ett word?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    It's actually an en-word. :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagpieMaggie

    Oh thanks! I think I wrote ett strejk in another question & it was correct that's why I understood it is an ett word. Thanks for the clarification. I will comment on that other phrase when I encounter it while revising.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesMorga430495

    English language would never use "may" in this sentence. In school language arts we were always told that "may" only had the sense of "Am I allowed to?" no sense of can in the work at all. As a matter in school if the teacher was asked by a student, "Can go to the bathroom?" The teacher would look at us and say, "I don't know, can you?" We would have to say, "May go to the bathroom?" So your use of may in this translation for Swedish "kan," is 100% not as used in English period. You have chosen this translation to simply make fools of the people on Duolingo trying to actually learn a language.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

    "may" has several meanings. One is related to permission - another expresses possibility. You may want to look it up in a dictionary, since it may be explained better there. I suggest e.g. https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/may

    As for the exact phrase "the strike may force", I found matches in highly regarded publications such as The Guardian and the New York Times. That may or may not be proof, but it's certainly good indication at the very least.

    Further, the course has been constructed entirely by volunteers, working for free to help teach their language. The way you phrase your post is frankly insulting.

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