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  5. "Lui non dovrebbe scrivere su…

"Lui non dovrebbe scrivere sui libri della biblioteca."

Translation:He should not write on library books.

August 11, 2013

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mariaelena256

how about: He must not write????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dnovinc

Then what would be the translation for: "He wouldn't have to write on library books" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peter2108

I think you would say lui non ha bisogno di scrivere (He has no need to write on the library books)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alipaulam

And how would 'lui non deve scrivere. etc' translate? I would say (direi) exactly the same. But it seems from a quick Google that the conditional is what people use for 'should not'. So why is that? In English, I suppose 'should not' is somewhat weaker than 'must not', so perhaps the italian conditional of dovere gives a similar nuance?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leonardicus

In Italin the conditional is used for polite requests. The use of potere, volere and dovere would change from can/want/must in the indicative to could/would/should in conditional. Conditional softens the verb meaning, I guess.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alipaulam

Ok, so the one option we haven't covered is, he must not write in library books. Lui deve non scrivere sui libri della biblitheca, perhaps?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leonardicus

Close, but non precedes the auxilliary verb: Lui non deve scrivere sui libri della biblioteca.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alipaulam

But dnovinc suggested above that 'lui non deve scrivere...etc' means 'he doesn't have to... etc', which is something quite different - it means, 'yes he can, but he doesn't have to', eg 'I am on holiday, so I don't have to go to school tomorrow' (I am released from my obligation to go to school). I mean here, he MUST not, he is obliged NOT to 'I have a highly infectious disease, so I must not go to school tomorrow' (I have an obligation NOT to go to school). Is there no way to convey these two different concepts differently in Italian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peter2108

PaulFromItaly, the moderator of the WordReference Italian forum, tells me that non devo can mean I must not or I do not have to depending on context. I am surprised by this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alipaulam

Well, there you go. I feared as much. Duo need to considerably expand the range of answers accepted, then.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobBlaney

The first time I came across this, I didn't link "libri della biblioteca" as library books, but thought it may be an author writing about a library. So I tried: He would not have to write his books about the library.

If this was the case, how would it appear in Italian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thesoph33

"To write about sth"is "scrivere su", so "he writes books about the library" would be "scrive dei libri sulla biblioteca"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Donny465006

I understood that he was writing on some books while he was being in library, instead of the books being library books. Is there a way to distinguish between the two meanings? I. E. Would the sentence order be different or some other structure instead of "dalla" used??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SebastianP8996

Where did 'dobrebbe' come from??

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