"He is a manager."

Translation:Han er direktør.

3 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mhairister

Why would 'han er en direktør' be incorrect?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RidderJakob

Grammatically, it would be correct, but it is much more common to leave out the article.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mhairister

That makes sense. Thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ali515832

Nouns denoting nationality, profession, religion or political beliefs:

•do not use an article in Danish

•do use the indefinite article in English

Example: Hun er læge. = She is a doctor.

But the indefinite article must be added in Danish if the noun is qualified by an adjective or relative clause.

Example: Hun er en dygtig læge. = She is a skilled doctor.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JulioSnche500786

The correct translation to Danish must be "Han er en direktør"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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It's not common to say it like that.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camillapik

det er simpelthen ikke okay

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FemiFatmaK2

What is a real meaning about "direktør" manager or director?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"Manager" comes pretty close, but it's not limited to this term. A direktør is pretty literal - someone who gives directions. The DDO gives the following definition: (title of) a person who leads or has a daily responsibilty for (a department of) a company, an institution, a ministry, or similar, and who is directly accountable to the leadership or the board of directors, if available. (I'm not entirely happy with this translation, but I hope you get the gist.)

So, it can be a manager or the head of an institution, or a (non-film) director or any kind of person who's somehwere in the centre of a work hierarchy.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aidan163756

why when the English statement "He is a manager." uses the word "manager", is "Han er en manager" not an accepted danish translation?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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They actually mean (slightly) different things bewteen Danish and English. A Danish manager is someone who governs the financial and marketing aspect of artists, sportsmen, and sports teams. I'm not sure if English uses the term "manager" for those. I think so, though.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aidan163756

The English "manager" also includes the danish definition, but is a more inclusive word. I would argue translating from English, either "manager" or "direktør" since the origin includes both.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Okay, that sounds reasonable. Manager should be accepted, then. (I wouldn't hold my breath for it getting accepted, though. The course is pretty old.)

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rich524475

Ali515832 THANK YOU. That is the clearest statement yet on why the article "a" is sometimes required på dansk but is often ignored for Nationality, religion, political affiliation/beliefs, and profession. Rich

2 months ago
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