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https://www.duolingo.com/yo_soycapo

Arabic in Spanish

yo_soycapo
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Just an interesting article about Arabic roots in the Spanish language. I found it interesting, anyway. Not something I had realized before.

http://spanish.about.com/cs/historyofspanish/a/arabicwords.htm

3 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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<h1>Ajedrez شطرنج</h1>

When I first encountered that word, I knew that was not a Spanish word.

Anyone fan of salsa music, or latin music in general are very familiar with this word borrowed from Arabic.

<h1>سكر</h1>

The arabic root of the word ojala is very telling because it sounds like insha'Allah "if god is willing." I've heard and read this word used often, I wonder if many Spanish speakers are aware of the word's Islamic roots.

  • Ojalá (del árabe لو شاء الله , law sha'a Allah; «si Dios quisiera»)1 es un adverbio utilizado para expresar un deseo de realización posible o hipotética. (es.wikipedia.org)

  • ¡ojalá! - interj. Expresa fuerte deseo de que suceda algo: (wordreference.com)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrookeLorren
BrookeLorren
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Great article. I was just thinking about how that must be the case the other day, when I was reading about Tariq bin Zayad conquering the Visigoths to my kids. I thought about the way Spanish sounds, and how it does have some similarities in how it sounds to Arabic. I guess that confirms it :-).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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Ok, I'm seriously intrigued. Are you reading a children's book about Tariq bin Zayad, an adult book or from some material online?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Renga1
Renga1
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Thanks. That helps alot remembering difficult words!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/G0108

"Alemania" (Germany) is a word that derives from Turkish and Arabic it seems.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AureliaUK
AureliaUK
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I think it more likely that it derives from Alemanni, the name of the tribe that once ruled over the south of what is now Germany.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alemanni

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yo_soycapo
yo_soycapo
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It does seem like that, no? By the way, does anybody know why the name of the country (Germany) is so different in certain languages? Ex: Germany (English), Alemania (Spanish), Deutschland (German). Those three names of the same country dont seem to have anything in common at all.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ygpdxwlr
ygpdxwlr
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image

  • Blue: Proto-Germanic *Þeudiskaz
  • Dark Green: Latin Germania or Greek Γερμανία
  • Yellow: the name of the Alamanni tribe
  • Red: the name of the Saxon tribe
  • Purple: From the Protoslavic němьcь
  • Light Green: Unclear origin

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_of_Germany

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/G0108

I have no idea. In Portuguese we say "Alemanha", in Dutch it's "Duitsland" in Romanian it's "Germania", in Norweigan it's "Tyskland". It's really different. I'm pretty sure "Germany" derives from Latin.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dopiy
dopiy
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In Turkish we say "Almanya". I think this differentiation comes from the nation's type of relation with Germans.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yo_soycapo
yo_soycapo
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Here is a link to the question posted in the German discussion forums: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/6940643

3 years ago