"Ele tem um emprego no município."

Translation:He has a job in the municipality.

August 12, 2013

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saniac

Could someone clarify the meaning of "municipio" here? Can it refer to the city administration, ie the local government body, or does it only refer to the area?

August 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

Any city/town is a "município", big or small.

In U.S.A - California é um estado. Palo Alto é um município.

In Brazil - Bahia é um estado, Salvador é um município.

(Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo are not very good examples, because the states and their capitals have the same name)

So, o município de São Paulo é a capital do estado de São Paulo.

October 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asgador

Pernambuco é um estado. Recife é um município de Pernambuco.

November 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

How could I ever miss that??? (Was I drunk?)

November 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itswarmerinmiami

No. I don't recall learning that word in my Portuguese classes. But i might have ignored it since i rarely use it in English.

October 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DREDWARD

DUDE,you really make me laugh sometimes.......:)

August 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Município is most of the time used to refer to (small) towns not the city adminisration.

August 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ludwigzhou

what word do you use for the city administration?

September 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

I'm not sure if I know exactly what "city administration" is, but we have "prefeitura". (Which is the town/city hall)

Prefeitura is the building/entity that manages all the city. It's where the mayor should be found.

"Município" is the name of the entire area within its borders under the management of the "prefeitura".

Sometimes "cidade" has the same meaning. And sometimes "cidade" refers only to the urban area.

June 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frnandoh

Municipio = County, city, often used when talking about public services City Administration = prefeitura Capital city = capital

February 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pfeil

Município, as in English, is an urban administrative division having corporate status and powers of self-government or jurisdiction, the prefeito (mayor) being its representative. It can be MUCH larger than its main city, as it usually encompasses a wider rural area and all the urban areas inside it. Each município is usually divided into many distritos, each one of them having its own rural and urban area. The urban areas are the cities, towns, villages...
Now & then distritos emancipate, becoming a new, independent município, having its own prefeito and câmara dos vereadores (city council).
Note: do not mistake distrito for bairro (neighborhood).

June 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mummele

I'd say both.

March 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/antlane

Município = city - houses, churches, streets etc + countryside - farms, roads, woods, land that is outside the city).

June 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PabloStanfield

In some parts of N America it could mean "He's got a job in the township."

February 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulconsul

Well, employment should work just as well as a job, and town should be just as good as municipality.

November 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spinatmaultasche

and "work" should also count ....

March 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mummele

Piece of advice: The words work - trabalho and job - emprego have different connotations. Having a work does not necessarily mean you have a job and that applies also to Portuguese. "Ele trabalha na escola", "Ele tem um emprego na escola" and "Ele e' empregado na escola" "He works at school", "He has a job at school" and "He is employed at school" All these sentences are simmilar but not the same. did you get my point? ^^

March 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimLNA

Is there any difference between the nouns emprego e trabalho in this case? Could we say ele tem um trabalho/emprego interchangeably?

June 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/antlane

I can have trabalho without emprego and - in this case ( a job in a city) - I can have 'emprego' (job) without trabalho (work). It is interchangeable if I have a job and I really work.

June 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hoprint

municipality is not really used in Britain. We would be more likely to say 'he has a job with the council'

May 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatMcCat

Is the council the area or the level of government? I would see municipality as the area over which the municipal government has jurisdiction. Does council work the same way? I'm Canadian, so "council" can be the body of people elected to represent areas within a city of town, e.g. the mayor and the councillors.) Just checking.

August 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TajMartin

We use 'council' in Australia too. I'm going to struggle to remember to write 'municipality' when I redo this lesson.

August 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZiggyGong

Accepted 8/26/18: He has a job in the city.

August 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hoprint

In Britain the term council is used both for the elected members and the administration - who work in the council house or town hall depending on where you are

August 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarksAaron

Why is "he has a business in the municipality" not acceptable? I.e. he owns/runs a business.

January 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PabloStanfield

Emprego means "works for"/emplyed by, not the owner.

February 25, 2016
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