"Var är toaletten?"

Translation:Where is the bathroom?

February 11, 2015

59 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MissMuse

Most important Swedish sentence to learn before visiting. :)

February 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/HoroTanuki

Duo

August 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

We call that one en bidé, if anyone wonders.

August 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/hornedhorse9

Same in english i think

January 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/g.uh

I've seen this a lot and I never knew, what's the function of that. I have already heard that it is just for women but maybe not. I don't know

August 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Salomee_e

Well I'd say it's mainly used by women but anyway a nice way to get clean after using the restroom.

April 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JDLENL

Why are we just learning this now, at almost level 10? >_>

April 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Rumour_man

I've heard native Swedes use the phrase 'toa' as an abbreviated slang form for toilet. Is that fairly common?

October 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

Yes, very common.

October 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Rumour_man

Thanks :)

October 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ZorbaTHut

So: "Toalett" vs "badrum". What's the difference?

February 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Lundgren8

Toalett normally just has a toilet and a sink whereas a badrum is bigger and normally the name of the room in your own house, it can include a shower etc.

February 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MissMuse

I remember a friend of mine from NZ laughed at me when we were at a bar and I told her as I got up I was going to use the bathroom, not the toilet/WC/restroom, so calling everything with a toilet in it a bathroom might just be something North Americans do. :)

February 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DuncanHill0

I think it's American - certainly British people would never use the bathroom in a pub (unless you were staying the night and wanted a bath).

June 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/IanCaliban

In England, we like to call a spade a spade.

If it contains a toilet, it's a toilet (or a more graphic term if we don't care about the company we're in).

If it contains a bath, it's a bathroom (even if it also contains a toilet).

It makes no sense that Americans call a room with no bath a bathroom, particularly when they're not even interested in having a bath. Or if not a bathroom, then the equally absurd restroom.

I mean, when was the last time anyone sat down on the toilet for a rest?

Or perhaps they call it the restroom, because that's where, after eating, one leaves the rest behind.

Equally strange is that Canadians call it the washroom. Who goes in there to wash? After doing the important work, certainly, but to name the room after the subordinate activity seems strange.

I suspect that historical prudishness is at the root of this euphemistic terminology.

December 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/KiwiDressager

I agree... While some people in NZ have caught on to the Americanisation of language and use the phrase "bathroom" (due to excessive American television on our channels!) many of us consider it rather American or crass/inelegant to say bathroom rather than toilet. Certainly it would be unusual for a kiwi to say "restroom".

Conversely when I slipped up and said "toilet" when I first moved to the US it was considered quaint! (I think they called me "cute" or something similar!) Having been here a while now I have definitely picked up some expressions and will surely be teased by my friends and family for using them when I go home!

February 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DomiKko

To be fair there are Brits who call toilets in, for example, pubs, restaurants etc. "Bathrooms" but they're usually upper middle class and don't want to be caught using a word such as "toilet" in public.

February 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/KiwiDressager

I just wanted to point out that the word toilet is also kinda prudish and euphemistic in itself. From French toilette - originally meaning cloth/wrapper, came to mean to dress oneself and thereafter to wash and prepare oneself. Hence, it developed into the word for a washroom and then on to the word for a room with a toilet etc etc. Language is odd sometimes!

February 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/kiteo

Sometimes I use the lolworthy old euphemism “I’m off to powder my nose” as a joke but then of course people often joke back “which powder?”

August 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/HnL.
  • 377

Actually, another way is to say 'excuse me, where are the ladies/gents?' or 'I'm just going to the ladies/gents'. You'd say these things in the UK, in public places like a cafe/pub/restaurant. Not in someone's home. I think it comes from a time when things were very polite. It's still a nice polite way to ask, if you're in a public place. The full version is 'ladies toilets' and 'gentlemans toilets' but the word toilet is dropped and you just say Ladies or Gents.

August 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/K.Odam

Actually, in English public buildings (like schools, restaurants, and so on) the term "cloakroom" is (or was) used.

March 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/kiteo

Yeah, Australians use toilet unless in super polite-prudish company and even then you could probably get away with it. Bathroom sounds euphemistic. (My bathroom certainly doesn’t have a toilet.) I’ll throw a cheerful “where’s yer bog?” when being super informal lol.

Oh now I remember being really confused as a young uni student working retail at the student union and Americans would ask me where the bathroom was and I’d get SO confused and try to ask for specifics of their need to help them (bathrooms seemed a domestic not public thing), which seemed to make them unhappy. I figured it out after a bit :)

August 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Austin211825

Yes it is

February 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/KittyPineapple

I am a new zealander and I call anything with a toilet the bathroom.

May 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Vladvarg

It's like "une toilette" and "une salle de bain" in french.

March 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/AlecHirsch1

Would you maybe call a downstairs bathroom with just a sink and a toilet in it toaletten while you'd call the bigger bathroom that you take a bath/shower in badrummet? Or would you call all the bathrooms in your house badrummet?

September 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Lundgren8

Yeah, I’d call the bigger one badrum and the one with just a sink and a toilet en toalett.

September 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/makmegs

I'm confused, why don't you use ligger?

April 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

You can say it but it doesn't sound very natural in most contexts. ligger is used either for things that are in a horizontal position, which I hope the bathroom isn't, and for things being located somewhere, but in most cases the toilet would be expected to be so close that you wouldn't think of it as 'located' somewhere, just 'being' somewhere.

June 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Aussie_Bogan

Please change this to accept "toilet". It is in usage for english speakers outside of the Trumpzone. I'll accept that "dunny" doesn't cut it but you have to accept toilets. Excuse me now I have to go.....the dunny.

March 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/KiwiDressager

It does accept toilet. In fact from memory that is the preferred answer. You must have made a different error.

March 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/kiteo

For me the word bank threw up “bathroom” as default which amused me.

Also, definitely using “Trumpzone” from now on.

August 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/NatalieBoa3

Yes, as an Aussie, I don't use "dunny, but "bathroom" does sound very euphemistic here, especially when it is common to have separate rooms for the loo (without even a sink), and the bath/shower/sink; the latter of which I would call the bathroom, and not the former.

April 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/NeilMitche6

Awful, genteel usage. The acceptability of toilet as a translation seems to vary with each exercise!

March 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/ElGaleto

The next sentence says "toaletterna är där borta"... So, could we also say "Var är toaletterna?" ? What's the difference?

March 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

toaletten is singular and toaletterna is plural. You're more likely to ask in singular if you're in someone's home, and more likely to ask in plural if you expect there to be many toilets, like at a big restaurant, festival or something like that.

March 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ElGaleto

Thanks, that makes sense! In French, we only use the plural, that's why I was asking.

March 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

I didn't know that, thanks for telling me!

March 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Iawesome2--GD

It accepts: "Where is the toilet????????!!?!?.!?.!?.!?.!.!!!!.!?.." also, right?

December 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

Yes because it doesn't count punctuation

January 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Vladvarg

Non, on peut aussi dire "je vais à la toilette". We also use the singular.

March 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ElGaleto

If you live in Belgium or Canada, maybe... Certainly not in France.

Here's a link if you're still skeptical ;-) http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2254853&langid=6

March 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Vladvarg

Ok then. I live in Belgium and I didn't know that. Thanks for telling me, I appreciate ;)

March 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ElGaleto

Yes, most people in France would say "verouiller" or "fermer à clé" (that's the one I personally use...), but some actually use "barrer". It's a regional thing, you will hear it in the Poitou. Here are other weird phrases from Poitou: http://www.topito.com/top-expressions-poitevines

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Vladvarg

Yes same in Belgium : "verouiller" and most of the time "fermer à clé".

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MonsieurCal

In Canada we say weird things. "Barrez la porte!"for instance, you say something like "verrouillez"?, no?

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MonsieurCal

Always "barrer" in Canada; I was not even aware of what "verouillez" meant until I say it on a EU airplane door.

October 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/jmguilloux

"Where are the restrooms?" should be another correct answer

July 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

No, but Where is the restroom? is. No need to pluralize it in English, you'd have used the plural in Swedish already then.

February 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/EldGyri1

Last sentence in the whole lesson:D

April 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Munkel1

Like in german, 'Toilette' can also be used for bathroom (with toilet) .

July 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/boris861451

Var är muggen?

September 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MerryBeninato

why am i marked incorrect when I had it exactly right?

October 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

There's a bug that does that sometimes. It's been reported to Duo but it seems to be hard to fix.

October 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/berkeson

how polite is this sentence? would it be inappropriate if i used this in front of some people i've just met?

March 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Callia.h

Would it be strange or incorrect to say "var är badrummet" if in a public place and not referring to a bathroom in a home?

June 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Trilby16

These toilet phrases are viktig to know!

January 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Sven-Ska

"Where are the toilets?" is wrong?!

February 2, 2019
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